Integrated Agricultural Business Management with Industrial Placement Award BSc

   
   
  

Fact file - 2019 entry

Qualification
BSc Hons integrated Agricultural Business Management with Industrial Placement Award
UCAS code
D40B
Duration
4 years full-time/year 3 out (available part-time)
A level offer
ABB-BBB
Required subjects
at least two science-based subjects at A level (business studies,economics, geography, maths and psychology also accepted). Citizenship studies, critical thinking, general studies and leisure studies are not accepted. We may also consider ABC depending on predicted grades in specific subjects. 
IB score
32-30 including 5 in two science subjects at Higher Level
Course location
Sutton Bonington Campus 
Course places
35-40 across agricultural sciences
School/department
 

Overview

Equip yourself with the business knowledge, latest agricultural science and technology developments to become future managers and leaders in agriculture and related industries. The course includes a paid placement year in industry. 
Read full overview

 

  • Ranked 1st for our agriculture courses in The Complete University Guide 2019, Agriculture and Forestry. 
  • Integrate business management and agricultural science to gain the skills needed to excel in leadership within the agricultural industry. 
  • Benefit from an industry placement year to gain valuable insights and further your skill set to offer to potential employers.
  • Apply business and science to real‑life farms, give presentations to businesses, participate in policy workshops and test out your own innovative business ideas.
  • Be taught by agricultural business specialists within the School of Biosciences, so your learning is always within the context of the agricultural industry.
 

agri business man
Benefit from a range of teaching approaches including applications of business and science on the University Farm, presentations and interactions with a range of businesses and organisations, field trips and policy workshops.

 

University Farm and Dairy Centre

Sutton Bonington Campus is home to the University Farm and Dairy Centre - we have a 450 hectare mixed farm, with arable crops, 200 dairy cows (robotically milked), a sheep flock, environmental stewardship land and new and established woodland.

The farm is commercially run, with facilities for research and teaching, including a Farm Demonstration Centre; farm staff contribute to the teaching on our degree programmes. 

The University of Nottingham is also taking the national lead for dairy research as the Centre of Innovation Excellence in Livestock. This has led to considerable investment and expansion in our dairy centre to deliver world leading research in livestock health and production to deliver improved food security and farming sustainability.

 

Yearly overviews

Year one

The first year explores the fundamental basis of agri-food markets, the influence of finance and commerce on agriculture and introduces systems approaches to farm business management. You will develop your understanding of the biological processes essential to understanding plants and animals, and examine food production and global food security issues. We also introduce you to the research and employability skills needed for your studies and the world of work.  

Year two

In the second year, you will study aspects of agri-business enterprise and innovation, agricultural and food marketing, practical policy making, agricultural economics, and human and technological resource management. You will develop your professional and research skills through a structured applied module. You can choose options which focus on applied animal or crop production, or learn about wider societal or business issues.  

Year in industry (year three)

This four-year programme includes a paid placement year in industry where you will put your academic skills into practice in the real world. This experience will provide valuable insights into industry and you will develop a further set of skills to offer potential employers. 

Year four

In the final year, in addition to your research project, taught modules  develop a deeper level of understanding of farm and rural business management, management consultancy, agri-business strategy and decision making, and allow you to test your own business ideas in a supportive and novel ‘innovation incubator’ environment. Optional choices allow you to extend previous study areas or examine topics beyond the core programme.

Recent final research projects include: the impact of animal disease on market prices, business and practical considerations of reduced tillage practices, drivers of farm diversification projects, and projecting enterprise and farm business profitability.

 

Study abroad

There are a variety of study abroad opportunities from a semester to a whole year. Depending on your subject you can;

  • apply to spend a semester at one of our international partner universities including Australia, New Zealand, Canada and the US.
  • study abroad for an additional year at one of our highly ranked Erasmus+ partner universities in France, Austria or Spain. 
  • Consider applying for International Agricultural Science which includes a year abroad 
  • or take part in a summer school, we have a range of options in subjects such as business, entrepreneurship and languages available

Find out more

 

Additional year in Computer Science

Boost your degree even further by studying computer science for ayear between years two and three of your degree, extending your degree to a four year programme.

A year spent in the University's School of Computer Science will give you training in software development and computing skills relevant to your final year research project and benefit you in your future career.

You can decide to transfer into this programme from your BSc course when you start your degree (subject to progression criteria).

 
 

Entry requirements

A levels: ABB-BBB, including two science-based subjects at A level (business studies, economics, geography, maths and psychology also accepted), and an additional A level or equivalent. Citizenship studies, critical thinking, general studies and leisure studies not accepted. We may also consider ABC depending on predicted grades in specific subjects. GSCE Mathematics and English with 4 (C) or above.

English language requirements 

IELTS 6.0 (no less than 5.5 in any element)

For details of other English language tests and qualifications we accept, please see our entry requirements page.

 

If you require additional support to take your language skills to the required level, you may be able to attend a presessional course at the Centre for English Language Education, which is accredited by the British Council for the teaching of English in the UK.

Students who successfully complete the presessional course to the required level can progress onto their chosen degree course without retaking IELTS or equivalent.

Alternative qualifications 

For details please see alternative qualifications page

Foundation year - a foundation year is available for this course.

Science Foundation Certificate

International students only

International students (non-EU) who do not have the required qualifications or grades to go directly onto an undergraduate degree course, may be interested in the Science Foundation Certificate delivered through The University of Nottingham International College. You are guaranteed a place on selected undergraduate courses if all progression requirements are met. 

Science with Foundation Year

Home, EU and international students

If you have achieved high grades in your A levels (or equivalent qualifications) but do not meet the current subject entry requirements for direct entry to your chosen undergraduate course, you may be interested in our one year science foundation programme. Applicants must also demonstrate good grades in previous relevant science subjects to apply. You are guaranteed a place on selected undergraduate courses if all progression requirements are met.  


Flexible admissions policy

In recognition of our applicants’ varied experience and educational pathways, the University of Nottingham employs a flexible admissions policy. We may make some applicants an offer lower than advertised, depending on their personal and educational circumstances. Please see the University’s admissions policies and procedures for more information.


Notes for applicants 

Our modular courses are flexible and offer the opportunity to combine your main studies with modules in other subject areas (please note that all modules are subject to change).

 
 

Modules

The following is a sample of the typical modules that we offer as at the date of publication but is not intended to be construed and/or relied upon as a definitive list of the modules that will be available in any given year. Due to the passage of time between commencement of the course and subsequent years of the course, modules may change due to developments in the curriculum and the module information in this prospectus is provided for indicative purposes only.

Typical year one modules

Core

Agricultural Business in the Global Economy

Today’s agricultural businesses operate in the global economy. In this module, you’ll explore both the influence of the global economy on agricultural businesses and the impact of agriculture on the global economy. You’ll look at the key issues affecting agricultural businesses today, including national and global economic drivers, supply and demand trends, the impact of financial drivers (exchange rates, interest rates and monetary flows) and the importance of trade agreements in agriculture. Importantly, you’ll also explore how consumer concerns have affected agricultural businesses globally (think free trade and traceability) and how agricultural businesses can affect the environment (think pollution and deforestation, but also amenity). You’ll have a mix of lectures, computer-aided learning sessions, field trips to local agricultural businesses and lectures from invited guest speakers.

 

Contemporary Agricultural Systems

Modern agriculture is a dynamic, fast-paced and high-tech industry. In this module, you’ll explore practical agricultural systems used by commercial UK farms. Designed for students with a farm or non-farming background, you’ll get to understand the fundamental concepts of agricultural systems within the context of contemporary markets, policy and research. Exact topics covered in the module will vary according to the issues affecting the agricultural industry in any one year, but examples include: dairy production, arable production, soils, agri-environmental interactions, labour and machinery management and farm business systems. You’ll have lectures from academics currently researching these fields and will visit the University Farm and external farms to see what you’ve learnt in practice.

 
The Biosciences and Global Food Security 

How can you use science to help improve global food security? This module introduces you to the issues of global food security and the complexity existing in different parts of our food generation system. Looking across the food supply chain, you’ll cover the evolution of crops, crop and animal production, and the food industry. Importantly, you’ll also look at sustainable nutrition because food security isn’t just about supply – it’s important that people are getting the right kind of food. You’ll learn about these issues through a mix of lectures and practical laboratory sessions. You’ll also develop professional skills to work safely in laboratory situations.

 
Integrated Agri-Food Markets and Marketing

Why should farmers or other food producers think about marketing? In this module, you’ll learn about the importance of applying market information and marketing management approaches to agricultural and food businesses. You’ll look at the key trends in food and non-food markets. Fundamental concepts of these markets and marketing techniques will also be introduced to help you develop an understanding of the agri-food supply chain, food retailing and sourcing, and regulations impacting on agri-food markets. You’ll have a mix of lectures, computer-aided learning sessions, field trips to local businesses and lectures from invited guest speakers.

 
Animal Biology
Animals – both pets and livestock – play a big part in our lives. In this module, you’ll be introduced to animal ecology and evolution and examine the basis of animal interactions with humans. You’ll then look at domestication and how animal production systems have been developed. Using practical laboratory sessions and lectures, you’ll learn more about animal biology and explore the way in which animal product quality can be manipulated. 
 
The Ecology of Natural and Managed Ecosystems

Pollinator species are hugely important for natural systems and for managed systems like agriculture, but there is concern that numbers are declining. What physical, chemical or biotic factors are limiting these species’ distribution? What other species are they in competition with? How diverse or stable is the ecological community overall? This module introduces you to the principles of ecology and looks at how organisms have evolved to interact with their environment. You’ll also cover population (such as competition and predation) and community ecology (such as the diversity and stability of communities, patterns of species richness). You’ll explore the various definitions of biodiversity and look at the loss of species and habitats, particularly in semi-natural and managed habitats such as woodland, hedgerows, meadows, and agricultural land. You’ll have lectures from current researchers in the field and the opportunity to apply your learning in the laboratory and through field visits.

 
Grassland Management

There’s more to grass than meets the eye. Grasslands are used for forage in agricultural systems but are also important as habitat for wild animals, birds and beneficial insects. In this module you’ll learn about the latest developments in grassland management, both UK and globally, and the policy issues associated with these developments. You’ll examine the morphology and physiology of forage grass species to understand the mechanisms of grass growth, production and utilisation and how these are influenced by management practices. In addition to lectures, you’ll have farm visits and computer-based tutorials so you can develop your understanding of grassland management, identify grass plants and use the latest subject-specific software to calculate a pasture budget.

 
Biosciences Tutorials and Foundation Science

The tutorials component of this module is intended to enhance your transition into university and guide you through the academic expectations of your degrees. This part of the module is spread throughout the year and includes three generic sessions on ‘study skills and plagiarism’, ‘study opportunities’ and ‘career and personal development’, and a series of small group tutorials with your academic tutor to develop generic skills such as finding crucial information, oral presentation, data handling and presentation of results, preparation for examinations, and essay writing skills relevant to biosciences.

The Foundation Science content has three elements: chemistry, maths and statistics and physics. The chemistry element will include: elements and periodic table; atomic structure and bonding; intermolecular attractions, chemical equilibrium; acids and bases, oxidation and reduction; rates of reaction; basic organic chemistry, isomerism, and rings. The Maths and Stats element will include: calculations, algebra, functions and relationships, powers, logarithms, descriptive statistics, significance, regression and presenting data. The Physics element will include: units and dimensions; power, energy and heat; light and the electromagnetic spectrum; attenuation/absorption; and radioactivity.

There is also an IT element, which interfaces with generic IT training for undergraduates provided within the University.

 
 

Typical year two modules

Core

Agri-Business Enterprise and Innovation 

Innovation and enterprise are key drivers of agri-business success and growth. You’ll explore a range of topics that influence agri-business success and growth, including knowledge transfer and exchange, intellectual property surrounding new innovations, planning issues for agri-businesses and technologies supporting sustainable intensification projects. Looking at particular contemporary issues, you’ll examine the issues surrounding taxation, green energy, inheritance and business succession. You’ll build on the skills developed in this module further in the final year ‘Innovation Incubator’ module, where you’ll develop your own business idea.

 
Economic Analysis for Agricultural and Environmental Sciences

Economic analysis can help you answer important management questions: how much fertiliser should I apply to my wheat? If demand for beer is going up, how will that affect the price I receive for my barley? Through this module you’ll gain an understanding of economic ideas and principles and be able to apply them to a range of problems of interest to agricultural and environmental scientists and managers. You’ll also examine the arguments for government intervention to correct ‘market failures’ with reference to the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) and look at CAP support mechanisms and their impact on arable and animal production. In addition to lectures and farm visits, you’ll have computer-aided learning sessions to teach you planning techniques that will enable you to use your economic skills to analyse the impact of the market and policy environment on business performance and stability.

 
Applied Agricultural and Food Marketing

Marketing is a lot bigger than just advertising. In this module, you’ll learn about the importance of a marketing-orientated approach to successful rural and food businesses. A hands-on module, you’ll use an agricultural or food business of your choice as a case study and, in small teams, analyse its market and create your own marketing plan. Guest lectures will be invited so you can learn more about how marketing theory is applied in practice and there will be a field visit to a local farm to see their marketing strategy in action.

 
Practical Policy Making

Within the Practical Policy Making module, you’ll develop your understanding of how and why policies relating to agriculture, the environment and food are developed, in addition to gaining a valuable insight into how to influence policy. The module will be delivered via a series of lectures and guest speakers, which may include Defra, the National Farmers Union (NFU), agri-businesses within the input supply chain and food retailers.

 
Professional Skills for Bioscientists
In this module you will develop and consolidate your professional competencies and abilities as a bioscientist. You’ll improve your core professional skills in the scientific method, experimentation, data analysis and measurement techniques that enable you carry out scientifically-sound research in animal, crop or management science. You’ll also cover discipline-specific topics. There will be a mix of lectures, workshops and group activity sessions for you to work on your skills.  
 

Optional

Applied Plant Physiology: from Cell to Crop 

Crops use solar energy, water and nutrients to grow, but how do scientists and managers overcome the limits to this growth? In this module you’ll gain a comprehensive understanding of plant physiology with an applied context – right the way from the molecular level to the field. You’ll cover major crop species in the UK and worldwide and examine the physiological basis of resource capture and utilisation in crop growth and development. You’ll explore limitations to resource capture by crops and how growers overcome these, in relation to integrated crop management. You’ll also learn about the physical aspects of the plant environment incorporating the key processes of photosynthesis, respiration, uptake and transpiration of water, and the uptake of mineral nutrients. You’ll have a mix of lectures and practical laboratory sessions to apply your learning. 

 
Applied Animal Science

A highly applied module, you’ll learn about animal physiology, nutrition and management and use your knowledge to think critically about production systems. Focusing on the nutrition, growth and welfare of farmed animals, you’ll cover a wide range of subjects, including investigating the energy and protein evaluation systems for ruminants and non-ruminants and the differential maturity of individual carcass components. You’ll compare systems of production for all major species of livestock and explore how these different systems integrate with each other and other enterprises on farms. Visits to local livestock farms give you the opportunity to further develop your understanding within a ‘real-life’ context and are a core component of the module.

 
Climate Change Science
Climate change is in the news nearly every day. This module is your opportunity to go beyond the headlines and investigate the science behind climate change and its effects. You’ll look at historical climatic change, the principles of climate forcing, and how aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems are responding to climate change – and what this means for humans. You’ll learn about how climate change is being studied and examine the role of modelling. You’ll also explore the political environment and how the climate change issue is framed by different players, and what the options are for climate stabilisation. You’ll have a mix of lectures as well as computer-based learning to see climate models in action.
 
Principles of Animal Health and Disease
Animal health and diseases can have serious health implications for people and livestock. In this module you’ll learn how diseases affect the body’s physiological and immunological systems. Focusing on companion, farm and exotic animals, you’ll explore the main types of disease and how to assess the health status of an animal. You’ll have a mix of lectures and practical laboratory sessions and gain experience in safe animal handling techniques.
 
Enterprise Management Challenge
This module aims to introduce you to agricultural management decision making in practice through team-based activity integrating science, business and economics. Working in small teams, and supported by teaching staff and industry consultants, you will be responsible for making management (science and business) decisions relating to the production of a crop enterprise or a livestock enterprise, based on University Farm, as for commercial purposes. Your team’s decisions – in the roles of both professional consultant and farm manager will be implemented by technical staff. For this module you will have lectures plus significant ‘field time’, including formal field site visits and informal field observation visits.
 
 

Typical year four modules

Core

Research Project 

The project gives you an opportunity to use your initiative and knowledge to undertake original research under the supervision of an individual member of academic staff. You will design the study, gain familiarity with relevant analysis techniques, undertake data collection, and where appropriate safety procedures relevant to the topic. You’ll undertake appropriate quantitative analysis and prepare a report of approximately 5000 words.

This important part of your degree, gives you the opportunity to participate in the work of one of the country's top agricultural research centres. Our research at Nottingham is funded by the UK and international organisations, including the Department of Food and Rural Affairs (Defra), the UK research councils and agricultural businesses and governments from around the world. This funding enables us to teach the most modern and exciting aspects of agriculture.

If you are interested in reducing greenhouse gas emissions from dairy cows, managing farms under the new agricultural policy environment (how would you ensure that University Farm meets the ‘greening’ requirements?); if you want to be involved in research into the influence of diet on reproductive performance in pigs or cows; if you want to know how seed rate and fertiliser application influences winter wheat production or how climate change will affect crop production in Africa and Asia, Nottingham is the place to be. 

Recent research projects have included: 

  • Methods for achieving differential advantage for the small scale mushroom producer
  • Why do farmers farm?
  • Post-Brexit profitability projections for UK arable farms 2019-20: Using actual farm data and an advanced projection calculator
  • How can urban agriculture help meet the food security needs of a growing urban population by enhancing fruit, vegetable and poultry production?
  • Business investment appraisal: To convert ex/used industrial sites into vertical farms within the UK market
  • Risk management in agriculture
  • Farmers’ markets and supermarkets: food prices vs. the consumer benefits of ‘local’ food
  • The relationship between milk yields, variable costs and the overall profitability of dairy farms  

Rural Business Research Unit (RBRU) and University Farm

Based at Sutton Bonington campus, the RBRU is the lead centre for the government-funded Farm Business Survey, collecting financial and environmental data from over 2000 farms; University Farm is a 450 hectare arable, dairy and sheep farm, also based at Sutton Bonington, with land and people dedicated to student teaching and research work. Both are available for your research project.

 
Rural Business Management
How do you apply management principles to modern rural businesses? This module will develop your knowledge of business management principles and provide you with an opportunity to apply these principles to the type of problems facing rural businesses at the present time. You’ll construct and interpret business accounts, use investment appraisal techniques, learn about labour and machinery management, explore the different forms of business organisation, and consider taxation. Using a ‘real-life’ case study, you’ll also learn and practice teamwork, time management and data analysis skills, which are vital when working in business. You’ll have a mix of lectures and practical classes, as well as guest lectures from invited speakers to give you insights into the management and finance of rural businesses.
 
Management Consultancy

Consultancy is a strong growth area for jobs in agriculture. In this module you’ll be introduced to the practicalities of management consultancy and have the opportunity to integrate your knowledge of management principles to a case study of your choice and based on a real-life commercial farm. You’ll learn how to appraise individual enterprises and whole firms with a view to improving the respective financial and technical performance of the business. With a strong focus on working productively as an individual, you’ll assess problems and opportunities, analyse information and data, and identify and meet objectives in order to aid managerial decision-making. To find out more about how consultancy works in practice, you’ll have guest lectures from invited speakers from industry in addition to your lectures and workshops.

 
Innovation Incubator 

Within the Innovation Incubator module you’ll have the opportunity to develop and test your own business ideas. You’ll learn about the principles of innovation and entrepreneurship, and you’ll be embedded in a supportive tutorial environment where external inspirational practitioners provide feedback on business concepts as they are being developed. A ‘Dragon’s Den’ experience towards the end of the module provides you with vital experience in business-to-business communication.

 
Human and Technological Resource Management
Both human and technological resources are at the heart of many successful agri-businesses. Drawing upon both academic and industrial agri-business expertise, in this module you will examine theories and practices to inspire people, manage change and implement different leadership approaches to achieve business success. You will analyse the role of current and potential technological developments within agri-business contexts and explore the trade-offs and challenges from drawing upon people and/or technology in agri-businesses.
 

Optional

Field Crops Cereals

A highly applied module, you’ll learn how to optimise the management of different cereal crops to meet the requirements of specific environments and end-uses. To do this, you’ll learn about the production strategies for the major grain cereals, with particular emphasis on factors controlling yield and quality. You’ll also examine the structure and function of the Gramineae and the influence of the environment and management practices on crop growth and development. You’ll have a mix of lectures, seminars, in-class exercises and field work to develop and apply your understanding.

 
Agronomy Field Tour

In this popular module, you’ll attend a five day field course to study selected field-grown crop species that have been chosen as models to illustrate major systems of production. You’ll examine the scientific principles that govern the management of field-grown crops through production to final end use, with particular emphasis being given to their physiology and ecology. Through field visits, you’ll observe and critically appraise the efficiency of current commercial production strategies and assess the scope to exploit plant responses to the environment at specific growth stages for optimal control of quality and yield. You’ll learn about the optimisation of quality and yield of crops through the manipulation of leaf, stem and root development, and the impact of post-harvest physiology on handling and storage. The field course is typically primarily based at the Sutton Bonington Campus with day-long trips to industry, farms and research organisations, and one overnight stay in an arable region. 

 
Livestock Production Science
How can production systems be adapted to meet demands for animal products in contrasting global markets? In this module, you’ll use your knowledge of physiology, nutrition, genetics, health, welfare and management to study the production of meat, milk and eggs, and the wellbeing of the animals in these production systems. You’ll undertake a detailed study of the integration of the production, nutrition, product quality, management and health of beef and dairy cattle, sheep, pigs and poultry at UK and global scales. You’ll be able to critically analyse key performance indicators and provide solutions to problems encountered in livestock production enterprises. You’ll have a mix of lectures, group work and farm visits to develop and apply your knowledge. 
 
Current Issues in Crop Science
In this integrative module you’ll consider the future options and possible strategies for maintaining or increasing crop production in the UK and world agriculture. You’ll learn about the latest trends and developments within crop science, and the philosophical, ethical and policy issues associated with them. The topics covered will vary to reflect the most recent issues, but have included: the future of genetically modified crops, impact of crop production on biodiversity and prospects for organic crop production. Using your subject knowledge and research skills, you’ll be in a position to critically analyse the advantages and disadvantages of developments in crop science, both for the module and in your future career.
 
Applied Bioethics 1: Animals, Biotechnology and Society
Animal-human interactions raise some prominent ethical issues. In this module, you’ll examine the ethical dimensions concerning animal agriculture, modern biotechnologies and research in the biosciences, in relation to both humans and non-human species. You’ll learn about the ethical frameworks used to analyse specific dilemmas raised by the human use of animals. Using specific animal and biotechnology case studies, you’ll interpret the main ethical theories and principles and apply them to the case studies to inform professional decision-making. You’ll have a mix of lectures and seminars to explore these concepts.
 
Applied Bioethics 2: Sustainable Food Production, Biotechnology and the Environment
Building on Applied Bioethics 1, you’ll investigate widely accepted ethical principles and apply your insights to contemporary ethical issues in agricultural, food and environmental sciences. You’ll explore the ethical dimensions of prominent issues raised by the agricultural practices (including the use of biotechnology and GM crops) designed to meet the nutritional needs of the global population. You’ll also learn about how ethical theory can inform professional choices and public policies related to food production and environmental management. You’ll have a mix of lectures, tutorials and team-based exercises to develop a sound understanding of ethical principles.
 
 
 
 

Industry placement year - integrated

This degree includes a year's placement between years two and three of your degree, extending your degree to a four year programme. You will apply for a placement during year two of the degree programme.

A year in industry can help you:

  • Gain the opportunity to put your learning into practice, giving you a better understanding of your studies and the chance to solidify your knowledge in an industry setting. 
  • Stand out from the crowd as a graduate: many students secure a graduate job as a direct result of their placement year.
  • Learn about what you enjoy doing, and your strengths and weaknesses, putting you in a strong position when considering your future career.

The school has excellent links with a wide range of businesses and research institutes, examples of relevant companies include KWS Seeds, McDonald's, BASF, ADAS, Velcourt and AB Agri.

The dedicated School Placement Team work with you to help you search for, apply and secure a placement, as well as supporting you prior to, during and after the placement.

Student placement stories

 

Careers


The University of Nottingham is consistently named as one of the most targeted universities by Britain’s leading graduate employers
(Ranked in the top ten in The Graduate Market in 2013-2017, High Fliers Research).


With a thorough understanding of the business management principles and practices required for modern agriculture and agri-businesses, you will be ideally placed to secure an exciting and varied career in agricultural, rural or food related positions.

For example:

  • food supply chain and retail
  • marketing and commodity trading
  • business management consultants
  • accountancy and finance
  • policy analysts and advisors
  • land agency
  • farming/rural business management
  • management trainees for major companies
  • PhDs and research positions in further education or private institutions 

Average starting salary and career progression

In 2016, 93.1% of first-degree graduates in the School of Biosciences, who were available for employment had secured work or further study within six months of graduation. The average starting salary was £21,597, with the highest being £30,000.*

* Known destinations of full-time home undergraduates who were available for work, 2015/16. Salaries are calculated based on the median of those in full-time paid employment within the UK. 

Careers support and advice

Studying for a degree at the University of Nottingham will provide you with the type of skills and experiences that will prove invaluable in any career, whichever direction you decide to take. Throughout your time with us, our Careers and Employability Service can work with you to improve your employability skills even further; assisting with job or course applications, searching for appropriate work experience placements and hosting events to bring you closer to a wide range of prospective employers.

Explore career options

 
 

Fees and funding

Scholarships and bursaries

The University of Nottingham offers a wide range of bursaries and scholarships. These funds can provide you with an additional source of non-repayable financial help. For up to date information regarding tuition fees, visit our fees and finance pages.

Home students*

Over one third of our UK students receive our means-tested core bursary, worth up to £2,000 a year. Full details can be found on our financial support pages.

* A 'home' student is one who meets certain UK residence criteria. These are the same criteria as apply to eligibility for home funding from Student Finance.

International/EU students

Our International Baccalaureate Diploma Excellence Scholarship is available for select students paying overseas fees who achieve 38 points or above in the International Baccalaureate Diploma. We also offer a range of High Achiever Prizes for students from selected countries, schools and colleges to help with the cost of tuition fees. Find out more about scholarships, fees and finance for international students.

The Felix Thornley Cobbold Scholarship

A grant of £3,000 per annum is available to a selected Home student (in Suffolk, Essex, Cambridgeshire or Norfolk) on this course.

Find out more

AgriFood Charities Partnership

The AgriFood Charities Partnership supports study for UK students on agricultural undergraduate degree programmes. 

Find out more

Rochester Bridge TrustBridge Wardens' Spence Agricultural Scholarship

Students living or studying in the following areas at the time of their application is eligible to apply:

  • Medway
  • Kent
  • London Boroughs of Bexley and Bromley
  • Cambridgeshire
  • Lincolnshire
  • West Yorkshire

The scholar will receive a grant of £1,500 per annum in each of three consecutive years. Students opting to complete a one-year industrial placement or computer science module will be eligible for an additional grant of £1,500 in respect of that year. Scholars must pass each year of study at their first attempt and provide a brief report to the Rochester Bridge Trust on their academic and other achievements during the previous academic year. 

Find out more

 
 
 

Key Information Sets (KIS)


KIS is an initiative that the government has introduced to allow you to compare different courses and universities.

Assessment

With the assistance of the dedicated Placement Team, you will spend your third year working on an industrial placement, putting your learning into practice. During the year in industry you will be required to complete an online record of your placement, including training completed and projects in which you are involved. Having finished your placement, you will submit an assessed Year in Industry report. You will also have the opportunity to apply to become a Registered Scientist with the Science Council, the UK’s professional science body, using evidence of the competencies you have gained during your placement. 

How to use the data

Disclaimer
This online prospectus has been drafted in advance of the academic year to which it applies. Every effort has been made to ensure that the information is accurate at the time of publishing, but changes (for example to course content) are likely to occur given the interval between publishing and commencement of the course. It is therefore very important to check this website for any updates before you apply for the course where there has been an interval between you reading this website and applying.

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