The Credit Crisis - Visualization - Part 1

An excellent visualization of the financial crisis and credit crunch.

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Mensenrechten.org
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Overzichtelijke site met heel veel informatie, filmpjes, nuttige links over de mensenrechten. Een greep uit het aanbod:

  • Wat zijn mensenrechten? Hier vind je o.m. een link naar het Mensenrechten Video Kanaal (inspirerende en …

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Are Flowers Smelling You Back?w
Animals utilize their sense of smell to explore their surroundings. But
what about plants? When you smell a flower, is it smelling you back? Is
it trying to figure out if your nose would make a good pollinator?
Chemical ecologist Consuelo De Moraes shows us a parasitic vine that
uses smell to find its preferred host—the tomato.  (02:48)

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Usman Riaz and Preston Reed: A young guitarist meets his hero
Usman Riaz is a 21-year-old whiz at the percussive guitar, a style he learned to play by watching his heroes on YouTube. The TED Fellow plays onstage at TEDGlobal 2012 -- followed by a jawdropping solo from the master of percussive guitar, Preston Reed. And watch these two guitarists take on a very spur-of-the-moment improv.Preston Reed’s hands have an otherworldly coordination. The fingers, nails, thumbs, and palms of both left and right dance, pluck, strum, and slap his guitar, which bur
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2.3 Effects on terrestrial vegetation

SAQ 13

Why do you think nitrogen is becoming increasingly available to terrestrial ecosystems in many parts of the world)

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8.2 Chromosome scaffolds

Most of the chromosomal DNA chains within the interphase nucleus are believed to be held on a scaffold or backbone structure made from various proteins, with loops of between 20 and 200 kb extruding from attachment sites. This chromosome structure is shown schematically in Figure 40. The scaffold, as well as permitting further compaction, serves to bring the DNA together in organised regions. There are many different protein components of these scaffolds, amongst them DNA topoisomerases.


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Nucleosomal DNA packaging into a 30 nm fibre: the role of histone H1

When chromatin is isolated from the nucleus and examined under the electron microscope, it can be seen as a 30 nm fibre. This fibre is formed through the action of the histone H1 on the nucleosomal DNA in the 10 nm fibre. In contrast to the other histone proteins, H1 does not contain the histone fold motif.

Compaction of the 10 nm fibre to give the 30 nm fibre is achieved by interaction of the H1 protein with both the linker DNA and the histone octamers, as shown in Figure 31
Author(s): The Open University

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The histone fold and formation of the nucleosome

We have seen how in the eubacterial chromosome, bending DNA serves to facilitate its compaction. A similar process occurs in eukaryotic cells in that DNA is bent and wrapped around a protein unit. In this case, the core unit is a protein–DNA complex termed a nucleosome. The nucleosome comprises the core histone proteins H2A, H2B, H3 and H4 arranged in a structure known as the core histone octamer, with an associated length of DNA. In order to understand how the nucleosome is a
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Glossary

Click on the link below to open the unit glossary.

Open glossary now...


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9.3 Health

The leader must be informed of any problems of mental or physical health that may affect safety during field-work. This may include, for instance, information on diabetes, asthma or epilepsy; students should also inform the leader if they require extra assistance. All work handling living organisms, soil or water may give some risk of infection, and protection in the form of gloves, masks, etc., may need to be carried. Supervisors should give advice concerning particular health hazards that m
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7.2 Information sources

7.2.1 How do I find the information required to carry out COSHH risk assessments?

The best source of information is the material safety data sheet (MSDS). By law (CHIP3) this should accompany any chemical that is purchased. However, if this is not available, or the chemical is old, then copies can be obtained from the manufacturer's website or information can sometimes be found in t
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5.1 Basic do's and don'ts and lone working

Some basic ‘do's and don'ts’ are:

  • Laboratory coats must be worn at all times.

  • When handling chemicals or sharps (any sharp object that can cause injury, particularly to the hands), observe good laboratory practice by wearing gloves. Latex or nitrile gloves are best, depending on the application.

  • There should be no eating, chewing gum, drinking, smoking or applying cosmetics in any laboratory.

  • No p
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4.2 Why do I need to know about first aid?

It takes only 3 to 4 minutes for a blocked airway to kill someone, but it can take more than 8 minutes for an ambulance to arrive on the scene. A simple procedure like opening an airway can save someone's life while you are waiting for professional help to arrive.

If you are working with harmful substances (chemicals, biological agents and dusts) you must know the first aid treatment if you are exposed. Do not expect a nurse or a doctor to know everything about every harmful substance.
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1 History of health and safety

The discipline of health and safety is relatively modern, only developing in the last century. However, throughout the ages people have voiced their concerns about people being exposed to harmful substances. Hippocrates mentions in the 4th century BC that lead miners and workers tended to suffer from diseases. The phrase ‘mad as a hatter’ was coined because mercury used in the hat industry caused mental illness. In 1775 Pott reported that chimney s
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Learning outcomes

By the end of this unit you should be able to:

  • understand the legal framework of the Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974 and Regulations associated with it;

  • understand the employers’, employees’ and visitors’ duties;

  • evaluate hazards and risks in order to carry out a risk assessment;

  • understand the legal requirement to report any accident or dangerous occurrence;

  • develop risk assessments for scientific laborat
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Introduction

Ths unit is an adapted extract from the course Postgraduate research skills in science (STM895)

This unit is designed to introduce you to the concepts of health and safety within a science laboratory or in the field. There are a number of legal requirements that must be adhered to before carrying out work in a laboratory. One of these is the necessity to carry out risk assessments on the chemical and biological agents that are to be used as part of your practical work activities. As par
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References

Bauer, M. W. and Gaskell, G. (2002) Biotechnology: The Making of a Global Controversy, Cambridge University Press.
Bowring, F. (2003) Science, Seeds and Cyborgs, Verso, London.
Campbell, S. (2004) A genetically modified survey, Spiked 
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Acknowledgements

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission to reproduce material in this unit:

The content acknowledged below is Proprietary and used under licence (not subject to Creative Commons licence). See Terms and Conditions.

Figures

Figure 4 BP (2
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4.1 Introduction

As bacteria secrete such powerful chelators into the environment, iron in other organisms must be kept under very close control. Any free iron within an organism is likely to be chelated by a siderophore, which may lead to bacterial infection within the organism In this Section we shall examine the biochemical systems that handle iron within the human body. The two areas we shall study are iron transport and iron storage.


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3.3 Summary of Section 3

  1. E. coli has a remarkable method of obtaining iron from its environment, which involves the use of very powerful iron chelators, called siderophores.

  2. One siderophore in particular, enterobactin, forms an extremely stable complex with iron(III).

  3. The high stability of this complex is due partly to the rigid, preorganised structure of the ligand, and partly to the iron(III) being the correct size and charge to be chelat
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