The student pathfinder
By creating pathfinders, students not only learn to manage time and produce a higher quality research project, but they also develop 21st century learning skills.
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Density of Rocks - Some Applications
In this activity students study some applications of knowing the density of rocks. One set of applications involves the stress, strength, and factor of safety for a rock roof resting on one or more columns in an underground room. A second set of applications involves the normal and shear stresses, cohesion force, and inclination angle for a slab of rock resting on an inclined surface. Students recreate spreadsheets shown in a Powerpoint module with formulas that answer various pieces of an overa
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Whatzzzup-Stream?
In this set of exercises, students will study rivers and waterways around them by using the Internet, maps, and their knowledge of local landscapes. The students will use an EPA Web site to investigate what is upstream and downstream of them. They will also look at graphs of flow in familiar river locations on a live U.S. Geological Survey Web site. Using small rocks and a washbasin, students will build a model that leads to extending their understanding of streams in different geographic locati
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John Higgins on William Blake
On Thursday 22 October the Gordon Institute for Performing and Creative Arts (GIPCA) Great Texts Big Questions lecturer is John Higgins a highly respected Professor of English Language and Literature at the University of Cape Town (UCT) who will discuss a lyric by William Blake "Never seek to tell thy love love that never told can be." Higgins will show how readings of a single poem can also serve to exemplify some of the main intellectual and analytic currents of the past forty years including
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Rocks Unit
Picking up, examining and collecting rocks can be the first steps in moving children toward an appreciation of geology and the “bones” of the Earth. Children can find a wide variety of rocks in many places, from the school yard to parks and driveways at home. Even very young children enjoy picking up rocks, lining them up, choosing “favorite” ones, pouring water over them to make them shiny and even painting them as gifts for adults. By letting children handle and observe rocks you give
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Tom Wujec: Build a Tower, Build a Team
Tom Wujec from Autodesk presents some surprisingly deep research into the "marshmallow problem" -- a simple team-building exercise that involves dry spaghetti, one yard of tape and a marshmallow. Who can build the tallest tower with these ingredients? And why does a surprising group always beat the average?
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Provisional acquisition as 'true acquisition', Kant's argument against colonialism
Fourth presentation from the Kant and Colonialism conference held in University of Oxford in October 2010. In association with the Oxford University Department of Politics and International Relations, The Centre for The Study of Social Justice (CSSJ), The London School of economics and Political Science and Nuffield College.
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3.3 ‘Intentionality’

Is the work of art a free-standing artefact to be interpreted entirely on its own terms, extracted from its historical context, as Bal does it? Or can the artist and the artwork be brought back together again without committing the intentional fallacy?

Joseph Margolis makes several important points about the relationship of an artwork to its maker which has significant implications for the limits and possibilities of interpretation of works of art. Margolis puts it thus:

Author(s): The Open University

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Copyright © 2016 The Open University

25 Jan 2011: The Veritas Forum: Robots, Autism, & God
Rosalind Picard, Professor of Media Arts and Sciences at MIT, will speak at Rice's 2011 Veritas Forum. She will present her work on affective computing, an interdisciplinary field that explores new sensors and systems that recognize and respond respectfully to human emotions. Dr. Picard will also discuss how her work and her faith mutually inform each other, how they shape her understanding of humanity, and how they inspire her to use her technical expertise to help those with autism.
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3.1 The role of observation

It was clear to Canadian psychologist Albert Bandura (1924– ) that not only is children's behaviour shaped by its consequences, but also that children learn by watching the behaviour of people around them. In contrast to behaviourism, Bandura's social learning theory emphasised the importance of children imitating the behaviours, emotions and attitudes of those they saw around them:

Learning would be exceedingly
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Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

P4 Klartext 20110302
Klartext handlar i dag om att Sverige har fått en guldmedalj i skidåkning och om att oroligheterna i landet Libyen fortsätter.
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Absolute Beginner #22 - Spending Money While Speaking Spanish
Learn Spanish with SpanishPod101.com! You’re looking for a good place to enjoy a late lunch, so you’re perusing the Spanish menus at nearby restaurants. The first one seems to have high prices, and there’s a bouncer collecting a cover charge. You’d rather spend your money on food, so you keep looking for the lowest possible [...]
Author(s): SpanishPod101.com

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"Flipping the Classroom": An interview with Chris Tisdell
In this video Chris Tisdell, Senior Lecturer, School of Mathematics and Statistics shares how he engages and motivates large mathematics classes at UNSW by creating and sharing YouTube videos, an eBook and broadcasting live interactive classes. Chris believes that using the available technology to facilitate a 'flipped classroom' model has had a very positive impact on student learning.
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Unit Circle Coordinates
This video explains how the unit circle has a radius of one and is centered at the origin of the coordinate plane. It is a concept that frequently occurs in many of the math subjects, especially those where Trigonometry is used. Questions asking about unit circle coordinates often give an unknown coordinate and require us to use the properties of a unit circle to calculate these coordinates. (2:34)
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TECNOLOGÍA AUDIOVISUAL
La asignatura se inscribe en el plan de estudios integrada en la materia de Tecnología de la Comunicación con el objetivo de abordar los fundamentos teóricos y prácticos que subyacen en las tecnologías productivas de carácter profesional implantadas en el sector comunicativo y la industria audiovisual. Para ello, se analizan en profundidad los sistemas tecnológicos audiovisuales contemporáneos y se realiza un acercamiento práctico a las rutinas operativas comunes al funcionamiento de lo
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1.02. First Implications of the Concept
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Essential Science for Teachers: Earth and Space Science: Session 7. Our Nearest Neighbor: The Moon
Why is the Moon, our nearest neighbor in the solar system, so different from the Earth? In this session, participants explore the complex connections between the Earth and Moon, the origin of the Moon, and the roles played by gravity and collisions in the Earth–Moon system.,Students and scientists explore the question: How did people explore the moon?
Author(s): Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics

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