355 GG Subject Object
Why "I love you" is the easiest way ever to remember the difference between subject and object.
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Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Olmsted County, Minnesota, 1976-2008.
By: WentzMR Dr. W. Ray Kim, Associate Professor of Medicine and Hepatologist at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN, discusses his article appearing in the January 2012 issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings, reporting on a 2-fold increase in the incidence of liver cancer during the past 3 decades, primarily in conjunction with the rate of hepatitis C infection. Available at: http://www.mayoclinicproceedings.org/article/S0025-6196(11)00004-8/fulltext
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9.1 Introduction

Psychophysics is the oldest field of the science of psychology. It stems from attempts in the nineteenth century to measure and quantify sensation. It attempts to quantify the relationship between a stimulus and the sensation it evokes, usually for the purpose of understanding the process of perception. Historically, psychophysics has centred around three general approaches. The first involves measuring the smallest value of some stimulus that a listener can detect – a measure of sensitivit
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11.1 The relationship between frequency and pitch

Although the perception of sound involves the interaction of frequency and intensity, many aspects of frequency reception can be analysed separately.

For normal or typical hearing, the limits of hearing for frequency fall between 20 and 20 000 Hz. Below 20 Hz only a feeling of vibration is perceived; above 20 000 Hz, only a ‘tickling’ is experienced.

As well as loudness, the other most obvious characteristic of a sound is its pitch. Pitch is a subjective dimension of he
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Rupinder Brar on Relativity, Einstein, and How to Stay Young
Rupinder Brar lectures on the topic of Einstein's special relativity theory and it's explanation of time dilation and simultaneity. The lecture is entitled Relativity, Einstein, the Speed of Light and How to Stay Young.
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Exploring the relationship between Science and Religion
Prof. Tom McLeish : Course
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Valley Forge, 1777 (The American Revolution)
When the Continental Army made camp at Valley Forge during the American Revolution, times were tough. The winter was bitter cold, and there was disease and hunger. (01:30)

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4 From DNA to RNA: transcription

In the process of transcription, the information in a gene, i.e. the DNA base sequence, is copied, or transcribed, to form an RNA molecule. RNA is therefore an intermediary in the flow of information from DNA to protein. Before we consider the details of transcription, we will first look at the structure of RNA.

The name ribonucleic acid suggests that RNA is chemically related to DNA. Like DNA, RNA is a chain of nucleotides.

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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • understand some of the ways in which genetic knowledge could affect medical practice, in particular in relation to predictive medicine

  • understand how populations are screened for conditions such as phenylketonuria and whether screening could be used for carriers of recessive genetic disorders such as cystic fibrosis

  • understand how gene chips may be used to screen for large numbers of genes at once,
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#253: Sedimental journey: Probing climate's buried past to predict our future

Paleoclimatologist Prof Jonathan Overpeck describes how research into uncovering the earth’s climate history generates important insights about our climate future. Presented by Dr Shane Huntington.