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What Is The Spring Equinox?
Meteorologist Jim Cantore and Winter Weather Expert Tom Niziol explain what the Spring Equinox is. (01:00)
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What Makes a Successful CEO?
Cassandra Frangos, who guided Cisco's leadership transition when John Chambers stepped down as CEO, discusses her new book on the skills and career strategies many C-Suite executives share.
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2.12 Faites le bilan: Sessions 6 – 10

Now that you have finished the last five sessions of this course, you should be able to:


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LSE Festival 2019 | Populism and Religion in the West [Audio]
Speaker(s): Tobias Cremer, Dr Zubaida Haque | In an apparently ever-less-religious West, how has Christian identity, however indirectly, been used as a focal point for populist discontent? Tobias Cremer (@cremer_tobias) is a PhD candidate at the Department of Politics and International Studies (POLIS) at Peterhouse, Cambridge. Funded by the Economic and Social Research Council his doctoral research focuses on the relationship between religion and the new wave of right-wing populism in Western Eu
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Group work PDF
Group work PDF - Profile Picture Dr Julie Price
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Money talks: End of Austerity?

Analysis of Britain's budget with our Britain economics correspondent. What is driving the fall in tech stocks? And, is Harley Davidson struggling to fire on all cylinders?

Helen Joyce hosts. Sound effect: THE_bizniss (cc x 3.0)


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Conclusion

This free course provided an introduction to studying Science. It took you through a series of exercises designed to develop your approach to study and learning at a distance and helped to improve your confidence as an independent learner.


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Introduction

Genes are units of inheritance that contribute to a person’s behaviour and health. In this course you will learn what genes, DNA and chromosomes are and how they combine to make the human genome. You will also learn how the principles of inheritance work, the effect that our genetic make-up has on health, and how genetic material is passed on from generation to generation.

This OpenLearn course provides a sample of Level 1 study in Author(s): The Open University

Acknowledgements

The content acknowledged below is Proprietary (see terms and conditions) and is used under licence.

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission to reproduce material in this course:

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Keep on learning

Study another free course

There are more than 800 courses on OpenLearn for you to
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Conclusion

This free course provided an introduction to studying Science. It took you through a series of exercises designed to develop your approach to study and learning at a distance and helped to improve your confidence as an independent learner.


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1.1.6 Late-onset multifactorial disorders

It is becoming clear that many, if not most, of the common diseases that affect the Western world are multifactorial disorders with some inherited genetic component. Some of the genes that render individuals susceptible to diabetes, coronary heart disease, hypertension and many cancers, including breast cancer, have been identified and can be tested now for the presence of mutations. Multifactorial disorders present a real challenge for genetic medicine. For example, while it may be true that
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1.1.5 Late-onset single-gene disorders

An individual might know that a late-onset disease such as Huntington's disease (HD) is present in their immediate family and that they might have inherited the disease gene(s). The problems of genetic testing for HD revolve around the fact that it is pre-symptomatic.

One dilemma is the long delay between testing positive and developing the clinical symptoms of the disorder in middle age. Is it better not to know and live in hope, or as one victim cried ‘get it over, I'm so tir
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1.1.3 Genetic testing of children

Within clinical genetic services, a difference has grown up between the testing of children and the testing of adults. Sometimes the genetic testing of children is relatively uncontroversial. For example, the genetic test may simply be to confirm a medical diagnosis that has been made on clinical grounds. So a three-year-old with low weight, blocked lungs and poor digestion may be given a genetic test to see whether they have CF or not.

There are other cases where a test is used predict
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1.1.1 Genetic counselling

In the UK and many other countries, genetic testing is provided by the National Health Service (NHS) or its equivalent, only after patients have undergone genetic counselling. This is defined as the provision of information and advice about inherited disorders, and includes helping people to:

  • Understand medical facts;

  • Appreciate the way in which inheritance contributes to the disease in question;

  • Understand the opti
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4.6 Tidal rivers and estuaries

Most of the major cities and harbours in the world are located on estuaries. The estuarine ecosystem is a unique intermediate between the sea, the land and fresh water.

A rather precise definition of an estuary is 'a semi-enclosed coastal body of water, which has a free connection with the open sea, and within which sea water is measurably diluted with fresh water derived from land drainage'. This excludes large bays with little or no freshwater flow, and large brackish seas and inland
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3.5.5 Biological indicators

A great many biological species and individuals occur in normal streams. These often differ markedly in their sensitivity to environmental factors, and likewise the tolerances of various species to different types of pollution vary considerably. The major groups of organisms that have been used as indicators of environmental pollution include bacteria, fungi, protozoa, algae, higher plants, macroinvertebrates and fish. The benthic 'bottom living' macroinvertebrates are particularly suitable a
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2.7 Infiltration

Entry of precipitation through the soil surface and on downwards, by gravity, is known as infiltration. The rate at which this process can take place is governed by the permeability (a measure of the ease with which water can flow through the subsurface layer) and by the existing degree of saturation of the soil. Infiltration can be impeded by outcropping impermeable rocks or by paved areas, and also by the presence of finegrained soils with a low permeability (such as clay). At certain times
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3.4.5 Fretting fatigue

An additional possibility was considered. It was known that there was significant movement of the bridge during passage of traffic, because users had noticed it many times when crossing. The joints would thus have been subjected to rotary motion around the pin in order to accommodate such vibrations. Could these have caused fatigue crack growth at the bearing surfaces?

Contact between a circular and a flat plate creates so-called Hertzian stresses at the contact zone: compressive at the
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An introduction to material culture
This free course, An introduction to material culture, introduces the study of material culture. It asks why we should study things and outlines some basic approaches to studying objects. Dr Rodney Harrison.
First published on Mon, 11 Jan 2016 as Author(s):
Dr Rodney Harrison

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Tell the time
Ask and pay for goods and services
Understand and give directions in a building
Understand what is and is not allowed
Identify and use dates
Use expressions of time