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3.3 Concerns about being a carer

Some of the things people mentioned were:

  • financial difficulties
  • loss of status
  • relationships if someone gives up paid work
  • physical and emotional demands
  • fears for the future
  • having to ‘fight red tape’
  • worry that they might seem to be overreacting.

Through their work, Jonathan and Jane identify other areas for concern. These include:

  • neglect of carers' o
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3.2 Feelings about being a ‘carer’

Carol, who looks after her mother and her aunt, feels the need to distinguish between being ‘a relative’ and ‘a carer’. She feels that health and social care practitioners don't always recognise who the carer is.

Julie, caring for her 11-year-old son who has severe learning and physical disabilities, complains about ‘the disbelief’ about the extent of help she provides.

Les and his wife, whose son has severe mental health problems, noticed that they tended to be ignore
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3.1 Caring relationships

Activity 1

Listen to the two audio clips. While you are listening, make notes on the different kinds of caring relationships being described. For each person, note down:

  • how they f
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Conclusion

This free course provided an introduction to studying Health and Social Care. It took you through a series of exercises designed to develop your approach to study and learning at a distance and helped to improve your confidence as an independent learner.


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References

Brooker, L. (2002) Starting School: Young children learning about cultures, Buckingham and Philadelphia, Open University Press.
Brown, A. L, Ash, D., Rutherford, M., Nakagawa, K., Gordon, A. and Campione, J. C. (1993) ‘Distributed expertise in the classroom’ in Salomon, G. (ed.) Distributed Cognitions: Psychological and educational considerations, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.

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Keep on learning

Study another free course

There are more than 800 courses on OpenLearn for you to
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4.3 Do children need to play?

Although we have considered the purposes of play and the extent to which it is valued in various societies, we have not considered how necessary play is for children's learning, development and well-being. There is reason to think that children who have their play behaviour severely restricted, or who find it difficult to play, can become very unhappy, or worse. In a study of 26 young male murderers, Brown (1998) reported that normal play behaviour was virtually absent throughout the lives of
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3.3 Different types of play

When thinking about play in early years and primary settings, it is sometimes helpful to try to make a distinction between different types of play experience: not in terms of listing role-play, small world play, and so on, but rather in terms of the balance of child and adult input and initiation. Free play is generally understood to be those play experiences that children choose for themselves and that involve minimal adult intervention. The term ‘free play’ is a bit of a misnomer, howev
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Harvesting Oil from the Earth
In this lesson, students investigate sources of fossil fuels, particularly oil. Students will learn how engineers and scientists look for oil by taking core samples from a model of the Earth. Also, students will explore and analyze oil consumption and production in the United States and around the world.
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PE.550 Designing Your Life (MIT)
This course provides an exciting, eye-opening, and thoroughly useful inquiry into what it takes to live an extraordinary life, on your own terms. The instructors address what it takes to succeed, to be proud of your life, and to be happy in it. Participants tackle career satisfaction, money, body, vices, and relationship to themselves. They learn how to confront issues in their lives, how to live life, and how to learn from it. A short version of this course meets during the Independent Activit
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HST.921 Information Technology in the Health Care System of the Future (MIT)
This innovative, trans-faculty subject teaches how information technologies (IT) are reshaping and redefining the health care marketplace through improved economies of scale, greater technical efficiencies in the delivery of care to patients, advanced tools for patient education and self-care, network integrated decision support tools for clinicians, and the emergence of e-commerce in health care. Student tutorials provide an opportunity for interactive discussion. Interdisciplinary project team
Author(s): Bryan Bergeron,Daniel Sands,Steven Locke,Mirena Ba

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Acknowledgements
Have you ever wondered how scientists analyse the environment? This unit introduces you to the techniques used by science students at residential schools. You will learn how to determine where rocks have come from and how they were made. You will also examine the processes involved in determining the ecology of a particular area.
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Learning outcomes
Have you ever wondered how scientists analyse the environment? This unit introduces you to the techniques used by science students at residential schools. You will learn how to determine where rocks have come from and how they were made. You will also examine the processes involved in determining the ecology of a particular area.
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Acknowledgements
Some of Britain’s most dramatic scenery is to be found in the Scottish Highlands. The sight of mighty Ben Nevis, the desolate plateau of the Cairngorms, or the imposing landscapes of Glen Coe can unleash the call of the wild in all of us. Although these landforms were largely carved by glacial activity that ended some 10,000 years ago, the rocks themselves tell of a much older history. The Highlands are merely eroded stumps of a much higher range of ancient mountains. This unit is an account o
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9 Sedimentation at the end of the Caledonian Orgeny and 10 Legacy
Some of Britain’s most dramatic scenery is to be found in the Scottish Highlands. The sight of mighty Ben Nevis, the desolate plateau of the Cairngorms, or the imposing landscapes of Glen Coe can unleash the call of the wild in all of us. Although these landforms were largely carved by glacial activity that ended some 10,000 years ago, the rocks themselves tell of a much older history. The Highlands are merely eroded stumps of a much higher range of ancient mountains. This unit is an account o
Author(s): The Open University

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8 Multiple plate collisions and the end of the Iapetus Ocean
Some of Britain’s most dramatic scenery is to be found in the Scottish Highlands. The sight of mighty Ben Nevis, the desolate plateau of the Cairngorms, or the imposing landscapes of Glen Coe can unleash the call of the wild in all of us. Although these landforms were largely carved by glacial activity that ended some 10,000 years ago, the rocks themselves tell of a much older history. The Highlands are merely eroded stumps of a much higher range of ancient mountains. This unit is an account o
Author(s): The Open University

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7 Sedimentation and tectonics at a mid-Ordovician to Silurian active margin
Some of Britain’s most dramatic scenery is to be found in the Scottish Highlands. The sight of mighty Ben Nevis, the desolate plateau of the Cairngorms, or the imposing landscapes of Glen Coe can unleash the call of the wild in all of us. Although these landforms were largely carved by glacial activity that ended some 10,000 years ago, the rocks themselves tell of a much older history. The Highlands are merely eroded stumps of a much higher range of ancient mountains. This unit is an account o
Author(s): The Open University

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6 Exhumation of the Grampian mountains
Some of Britain’s most dramatic scenery is to be found in the Scottish Highlands. The sight of mighty Ben Nevis, the desolate plateau of the Cairngorms, or the imposing landscapes of Glen Coe can unleash the call of the wild in all of us. Although these landforms were largely carved by glacial activity that ended some 10,000 years ago, the rocks themselves tell of a much older history. The Highlands are merely eroded stumps of a much higher range of ancient mountains. This unit is an account o
Author(s): The Open University

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5 Arc-continent collision: the Grampian phase of the Caledonian Orogeny
Some of Britain’s most dramatic scenery is to be found in the Scottish Highlands. The sight of mighty Ben Nevis, the desolate plateau of the Cairngorms, or the imposing landscapes of Glen Coe can unleash the call of the wild in all of us. Although these landforms were largely carved by glacial activity that ended some 10,000 years ago, the rocks themselves tell of a much older history. The Highlands are merely eroded stumps of a much higher range of ancient mountains. This unit is an account o
Author(s): The Open University

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4 Continental break up and opening of the lapetus Ocean
Some of Britain’s most dramatic scenery is to be found in the Scottish Highlands. The sight of mighty Ben Nevis, the desolate plateau of the Cairngorms, or the imposing landscapes of Glen Coe can unleash the call of the wild in all of us. Although these landforms were largely carved by glacial activity that ended some 10,000 years ago, the rocks themselves tell of a much older history. The Highlands are merely eroded stumps of a much higher range of ancient mountains. This unit is an account o
Author(s): The Open University

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