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2.5.2 Punctuation

Some of the sentences we have looked at are harder to understand than they might be because they are not very well punctuated. Punctuation marks are the ‘stops’ in a sentence that divide it up into parts. They make it easier to follow the meaning of the words. For instance, it is easier to read this sentence of Philip's if we put a comma after ‘wealthy’:

With society becoming more wealthy, it was possible for t
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1 Your worries and concerns with charts, graphs and tables

Do you sometimes feel that you do not fully understand the way that numbers are presented in course materials, newspaper articles and other published material?

What do you consider are your main worries and concerns about your ability to understand and interpret graphs, charts and tables?

Spend a few minutes writing these down before you read on.

One student has said:

I am never quite sure that I
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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • reflect on existing skills and mathematical history, set up strategies to cope with mathematics and assess which areas need improving

  • understand the following mathematical concepts, through instruction, worked examples and practice activities: reflecting on mathematics; reading articles for mathematical information; making sense of data; interpreting graphs and charts

  • draw on a technical glossary, p
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2.5 Other aspects of writing

Now we will look at the way Philip and Hansa wrote and presented their essays. Did you find them both easy to read? As regards Philip's, my answer is, ‘yes and no’. It is sometimes easy because he has a fluent way with words. But it is often difficult because he does not use enough punctuation to help us make sense of his words, and because of certain mistakes he makes. I found Hansa's essay easier to read. Her writing is more technically correct and more assured than Philip's. But
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1.2.1 What evidence are we reading?

Although we live in a society where a huge amount of information is available in the form of numbers, some of us still feel a mental fog descend when we are asked to deal with them. This is because numerical information is information in a very condensed and abstract form. A number on its own means very little. You have to learn to read it. Numeracy (the ability to work with numbers) is a skill that we can learn. It is a very useful skill, because it allows us to understand very quickly the <
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Keep on learning

Study another free course

There are more than 800 courses on OpenLearn for you to
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1.1 Preparation for study

One of the main purposes of this course is to help you develop two kinds of skills:

  • the general skills of being a student

  • some skills which are particularly associated with the way social scientists work.

Both are of fundamental importance to your success in studying other courses. This course is about the very basic study skills of reading and taking notes. These are basic in the sense that they are the foundation for al
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3.1 The beginning of the research process

What distinguishes psychological research from common sense is that psychologists approach information and knowledge in a systematic and consciously articulated way. They use rules and procedures about how to build and apply theories, how to design studies to test hypotheses, how to collect data and use them as evidence, and how to evaluate all forms of knowledge. (See Figure 1, ‘The cycle of enquiry’ in Author(s): The Open University

2.3.2 Inner experiences

A second kind of data is people's inner experiences, including their feelings, beliefs and motives. These cannot be directly seen from the outside; they remain private unless freely spoken about or expressed in some other way. Examples of these inner experiences include feelings, thoughts, images, representations, dreams, fantasies, beliefs and motivations or reasons. These are only accessible to others via verbal or written reports or as inferred from behaviours such as non-verbal communicat
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Formats

Later in 2013, OpenLearn free courses will be available to be downloaded or taken away in several formats:

  • print format
  • course content XML
  • course content RSS
  • OU XML package
  • IMS Content Package
  • IMS Common Cartridge
  • plain zip
  • Moodle back-up.

At the asset level, the major formats you will find are:

  • text in XML or PDF
  • animations in Flash
  • i
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Content

If we look specifically at OpenLearn free courses, the content comprises both the course (structured self-study resources) as well as the individual assets that make up a course.

The assets of a course are the materials such as text, images, animations, audio clips, etc., which are likely to be in different digital formats. In some cases a course will consist of just one asset, but most contain a variety.

As the number of OpenLearn free courses grows, so does the variety available
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3 Finding and evaluating OERs

When seeking content for adaptation and re-use in open educational contexts there are several tools available to support discovery. Many of these tools are the result of experimental prototyping and short-term funded projects, however, and therefore carry with them a certain amount of risk. Not all are sustained beyond the life of the funding, but these initiatives have sought to use a variety of search technologies to support the discovery of generic and domain-specific OERs. As we move forw
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Round 2: Acronyms

Define the acronyms

Question 1

What do the followi
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6 One hundred possibilities

The more teachers are convinced that intellectual and expressive activities have both multiplying and unifying possibilities, the more creativity favours friendly exchanges with imagination and fantasy.

Creativity requires that the school of knowing finds connections with the school of expressing, opening the doors to the hundred languages of children.

(Loris Malaguzzi, 1990)

In each of t
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4.1 Geography as a medium of education

Geography is what geographers do.

(Anon)

Aren't we all geographers now?

(Buttimer, 2004)

Define history. Now define geography

(Gritzner, 2004)

Charles Gritzner supplies us with one of t
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2.1 The significance of geography as a subject

It has been argued that geography ‘has been hijacked by environmentalists’. Following the publication of his original article, ‘Constructing a value map’ (see under the link below), Alex Standish (a former geography teacher) appeared on the Radio 4 Today programme to discuss this topic. Listen to the interview again and read the transcript again by clicking on the link below.

Read Alex Standish's 'Constructing a value map' by clicking 'view document' below.


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1.1 Chasms and great divides: can we imagine a world without geography?

Many school systems around the world do not have geography with the status of a separate subject. Schools in England and Wales are different. Here, geography is a national curriculum subject (5–14 years) and the former Minister for Schools (Stephen Twigg) has asserted the subject's importance in several speeches in 2004. For example, he says:

‘The unique contribution of geography is preparing young people to en
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References

Davies, S. White Man Sleeps, performed by Siobhan Davies Dance Company.
Rist, R. (1991) ‘Dance Science’, The Dancing Times, December 1991, p. 243.

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4 Performance skills

Performance skills are those aspects that set dancing apart from mechanical movement. Often, our attention is drawn to the dancer who is using a range of performance skills effectively, because they stand out from the rest.

Performance skills are aspects such as:

  • focus;

  • projection;

  • musicality;

  • timing;

  • emphasis;

  • expression.

All of these aspects are connected
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Motive: Upper Intermediate German
This course extends language skills and cultural knowledge. By working with authentic material from German-speaking countries, you will learn how to communicate in a wide range of situations: expressing opinions; reporting other people’s comments; explaining processes and trends; electronic communications; structured notes and texts. Cultural themes explored include changing demographic and social patterns; jobs and the role of work; German media and arts; issues of faith and personal beliefs;
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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

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