5.1.1 Art History

Haggar, R.G. (ed.) (1962) A Dictionary of Art Terms, London, Oldbourne.

Hall, J. (ed.) (1979) Hall's Dictionary of Subjects and Symbols in Art, London, John Murray.


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Introduction

Social scientists collect evidence to support their claims and theories in different ways. Such evidence is crucial to the practice of social science and to the production of social scientific knowledge.

You may be aware of the idea of active reading, which is about reading with the aim of understanding and grasping something: a definition, an argument, a piece of evidence. What that suggests is that active reading is about reading and thinking at the same time. In
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1.1 What makes a map?

Map 1
Map 1 The Millennium Dome in Greenwich, one of 56,000 photographs taken for the Millennium Map – 2000's answer to the Domesday Book (Source: The Guardian,
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1.5 Summary of Section 1

The auditory system is able to process sounds in such a way that, although several may be present simultaneously, it is possible to focus upon the message of interest. However, in experiments on auditory attention, there have been contradictory results concerning the fate of the unattended material:

  • The auditory system processes mixed sounds in such a way that it is possible to focus upon a single wanted message.

  • Unattended material a
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1.3 Psychology has social impact

The relevance of psychology to everyday concerns, and the ease with which it can be popularised and used, mean that psychological knowledge – some of it dubious, some of it accurate – is continually absorbed into culture and often incorporated into the very language we use. Examples of psychological concepts that have entered popular discourse include the notion that we are predisposed, both through evolution and through the functioning of our brains and nervous systems, to behave in cert
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References

Bush T. and Middlewood D. (1997) Managing People in Education, Paul Chapman, London, p. 172.
The Education (School Teacher Appraisal) (England) Regulations 2000
DfES/Ofsted 2005, A New Relationship with Schools: Next Steps.

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1 What is monitoring?

Monitoring means gathering evidence to show what progress has been made towards strategic priorities and targets and the implementation of policies.

Evaluation means making judgements about the results.

DfES 2003, National Training Programme for New Governors, Module 2, p. 4.

Monitoring is a key aspect of governors' remit; it is necessary so that governing bodies can carry out their strat
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1 6. Conclusion

This unit has explored the ways in which moving and still images may motivate and inspire pupils in their understanding of music. You may find it helpful to share your experiences of using images with your peers, perhaps through a short presentation to your department.


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1 3. From experience to interpretation

In almost all films, the visual story is completed first, dialogue and sound effects are then added and music is composed last of all. However, when Disney made the animated film Fantasia in 1940, they reversed the process, producing animations based on pieces of classical music. You may like to look at the Disney archives website, or read some information about the making of Fantasia from the Disney family museum website.

At the time, this was thought of as a way to popularise c
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6.1 ‘Non-citizenship’ to ‘social-citizenship’ and worker rights

We respect our masters, and are willing to work for our support, and that of our parents, but we want time for more rest, a little play, and to learn to read and write. We do not think it right that we should know nothing but work and suffering, from Monday morning to Saturday night, to make others rich. Do, good gentlemen, inquire carefully into our concern.

[Submission from Manchester's Factory Children Committe
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1.5.9 Plagiarism

Referencing is not only useful as a way of sharing information, but also as a means of ensuring that due credit is given to other people’s work. In the electronic information age, it is easy to copy and paste from journal articles and web pages into your own work. But if you do use someone else’s work, you should acknowledge the source by giving a correct reference.

Taking someone's work and not indicating where you took it from is termed plagiarism and is regarded as an infringemen
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1.2.1 Planning your search

Your approach to searching will depend to a great extent on what kind of person you are. In an ideal world, when searching for information for a specific purpose, we would all find what exactly we were looking for at the first attempt, especially if we are in a hurry. However, it’s always a good idea to have some kind of plan when you are searching for information, if only to help you plan your time and make sure you find the information you need. If I was starting to search for material on
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Keep on learning

Study another free course

There are more than 800 courses on OpenLearn for you to c
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5.4 The influence of the Western perspective

With regard to the first set of problems – that the rights discourse is not universal but is deeply informed by a Western perspective – it is striking that many actors and commentators on the international stage now frame their arguments and assertions in terms of the language of rights and justice. Yet we need to ask to what extent this language of rights and justice really underpins shared understandings and values. There is a strong case for saying that if there are shared understandin
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3 Lesson delivery

The way in which we deliver our lessons will have an impact on the students' interest and engagement in the work. If we appear enthused and excited by the subject that we are studying, then at least some of this enthusiasm will inevitably rub off on our class.

The successful teacher will deliver his or her lessons with a sense of:

  • Pace: keeping the class and the learning moving forwards.

  • Clarity: knowing where th
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2 Lesson format

For some of our students, school can feel like a confusing and even frightening place. Those students who come from backgrounds where there is little structure need to be given a feeling of security if they are to work to the best of their ability. Finding ways to give a clear format to our lessons will give the students a ‘hook’ to hang on to when the demands of the academic environment are putting them under pressure.

There are various ways in which we can format our lessons to en
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References

Alexander, R. J., Rose, J. and Woodhead, C. (1992) Curriculum Organisation and Classroom Practice in Primary Schools: a discussion paper, London, Department of Education and Science.
Awdurdod Cymwysterau, Cwricwlwym ac Asesu (ACCAC, or the Qualifications, Curriculum and Assessment Authority for Wales) (2000a) Desirable Outcomes for Children's Learning before Compulsory School Age, Cardiff, ACCAC.
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2.1 Language in everyday life

Language is an ever-present feature of human life. In the developed world in particular, we are surrounded by language. Radio and television provide a soundtrack to the lives of many people. Written language is part of everything from cereal packets and street signs, to relatively new technologies such as email and text messaging. If you were completely alone, far away from any other people or any kind of human contact, how long would it be before words came into your head, perhaps because of
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Learning outcomes

By the end of this unit you should have:

  • examined your own practice in relation to working with other professionals in order to make your underpinning knowledge, values and beliefs explicit;

  • used a variety of ‘tools’ to examine the knowledge, values and beliefs underpinning your practice;

  • identified contradictions between your underpinning knowledge, values and beliefs and your practice;

  • seen where you might want to develop your p
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Learning outcomes

After studying this unit you should be able to:

  • understand narrating in the past

  • describe a place and daily routines in the past

  • revise the presente histórico, preterite and imperfect tenses

  • distinguish between the uses of the preterite and imperfect tenses

  • locate events in the past: time expressions and dates, sequencing an account

  • write descriptive texts.


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