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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • understand Schubert's place as a composer in early nineteenth-century Vienna

  • understand the place of Schubert in the history of German song and the development of Romanticism

  • follow the words of songs by Schubert while listening to a recording, using parallel German and English texts

  • comment on the relationship between words and music in Schubert's song settings.


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3.4 Health and the working class

However, for a large proportion of the population, altering diet, clothing or behaviour in the pursuit of better health was well nigh impossible. The working classes, who made up the vast majority of the population, survived on tight budgets. In 1913, the typical workers’ wage of £1 per week just covered the essentials of food and rent, and left limited opportunities to follow a healthier lifestyle (Pember Reeves, 1913). The staples of the working-class diet were white bread, margarine and
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POL335 Session 8 Spring 2012
POL335 Session 8 Spring 2012 International Politics with Hamoud Salhi Guest: Ferial Masry
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5.2.2 Avoiding absurdity

One such strategy is to be as true to the literal meaning as is possible but to ensure, so far as the words allow, an interpretation which avoids absurdity. In the case of the rule I have just set out, this would mean an interpretation which ensured that only those customers who had caused breakages were obliged to pay for them.

This approach works well in most cases, but not always. Take, for example, another rule posted up in a shop selling china and glass:

Author(s): The Open University

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Dora the Explorer Sings "Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star"
Very cute rendition of "Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star" featuring Dora the Explorer (01:05).
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1.1.1 Introduction

Many of the smaller branded goods on sale to consumers in Europe and North America – the latest in clothing and footwear or the smart toys and electronic gadgets on offer – are made in factory ‘sweatshops’. Found in the backstreets of modern, Western cities, but more often than not a feature of the poorer parts of the world, factory sweatshops are an integral part of today's global economy. Increasingly, as you can see from Author(s): The Open University

Manifest Destiny
Amateur video with slides and narration. There is a great deal of information and interpretation. Reasons for the feeling of Manifest Destiny as well as some of the results of the feeling are a big part of this video.

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Session 1 — Historiciser la ville néolibérale - Commentaires et Questions (audio)

Commentaires : Thomas Sugrue — University of Pennsylvania


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Music for a Mother and Child
Music for a Mother and Child

00:01:48
© 2000–2016 The Metropolitan Museum of Art. All rights reserved.

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Arthropods by StudyJams
Arthropods make up 75% of invertebrates.  Arthropods have several qualities in common:  jointed legs, bodies divided into sections, and an exoskeleton, or shell.  Some of the arthropods you may know include: lobsters, millipedes, spiders, ants, and butterflies.  Learn more about arthropods with this slide show from StudyJams.  Vibrant images are set to music while information is written under each photo.  A short, self-checking quiz is also included with this link.&
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1.3 Nick Ut's 1972 Vietnam war photograph

Figure 1 Huynh Cong (Nick) Ut, 1972.
Figure 1: Huynh Cong (Nick) Ut, 1972: ‘Phan Thi Kim Phuc, centre, her burni
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7.2 Averages

7.2.1 Mean, median and mode

The mean, median and mode are all types of average and are typical of the data they represent. Each has advantages and disadvantages, and can be used in different situations, but they all give us an idea of the general size of the values involved. Here we provide brief definitions, and some idea of when each should be used.

The following set of data i
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Missouri Government and Politics: Lecture 3 - Constitution
This course is designed to familiarize students with the constitutional framework and institutions of the state of Missouri, including the legislative, executive, and judiciary branches, and its political parties. Missouri's inherent conservatism and individualism is explored in the frame of the state's role as a ''laboratory of democracy." Special attention is given to innovations in welfare and education policies, as well as Missouri's role in the national debates over the right to privacy a
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goREACT App for iOS
'With goREACT, you can become a virtual chemist. Whether you're a novice or expert, the free play and guided modes make it fun and fascinating.- Initiate nearly 300 virtual chemical reactions by dragging elements into the Reaction Area.- Amazing images and videos illustrate the molecules you create.- Select alternate views of the Periodic Table to discover different aspects of the elements’ chemical properties.- Touch any of the Periodic Table's 118 elements to see an image and fun fact ab
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Provost Corner with Interim Provost John A. Barrett - April 2015
In the April edition of the Provost Corner - John Barrett welcomes Dr. Sharon Gaber as the 17th president, and the Shining Star Awards are announced.
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3.1 Introduction

The purpose of this section is to consolidate your understanding of the theory of evolution through natural selection by looking at a specific example. The guppy (Poecilia reticulata) is a small fish whose natural habitat is small streams in northern Trinidad, but it is also a popular aquarium fish. Male and female guppies are very different in appearance (Author(s): The Open University

Introduction

For many calculations you use a calculator. The main aim of this unit is to help you to do this in a sensible and fruitful way. Using a calculation to solve a problem involves four main stages:

  • Stage 1: working out what calculation you want to do;

  • Stage 2: working out roughly what size of answer to expect from your calculation;

  • Stage 3: carrying out the calculation;

  • Stage 4: interpreting the answer – Doe
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The Gunpowder Plot - Documentary, Part 4
This part of the video shows the place where the gunpowder was placed and what it looks like today. There is an explanation of the way in which the conspirators were caught. Also, there is a technical explanation of what the explosion would have been like if it had taken place. (02:22)
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Temporary Architecture: An urban mirage
One of the emerging multidisciplinary contemporary art practices is interactive installation art, which is concerned with constructing a temporary artistic environment that is digital, responsive and engaging. It is usually displayed within existing architectural context whether indoor in a gallery space or outdoor in a public space. Recent examples of such art projects show that interactivity and illusion are effectively present and highly influential in the perception and memory of the place.
Author(s): Al-Mousa , Sukainah Adnan

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Rights not set

Introduction

Your course might not include any maths or technical content but, at some point during your course, it's likely that you'll come across information represented in charts, graphs and tables. You'll be expected to know how to interpret this information. This unit will help you to develop the skills you need to do this. This unit can be used in conjunction with openlearn unit LDT_4 More working with charts, graphs and tables, which looks into more ways to present statistical inform
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