Babbage: The price of a private phone call
Would you spend £10,000 on a smartphone? Tom Standage and Anne McElvoy visit the world of luxurious technology. Matthew Kaplan explains how your holiday snaps can have scientific uses, and researcher Lauren Sherman reveals how teenage brains react to social media
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Root Bodied Forth BB96_02064

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Festival of Britain 1951. Lambeth, London. Mitzi Solomon Cunliffe's sculpture 'Root Bodied Forth' exhibited on the South Bank Exhibition site.
© Historic England


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Bundel met oefeningen Nederlands
werkwoorden.jpg

Deze oefenbundel is oorspronkelijk voorzien als straftaak, maar de oefeningen zijn apart zeker ook bruikbaar. Ze bevat zes eerder grote oefeningen over werkwoorden of ontbrekende letters in woorden.


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1 Your worries and concerns with charts, graphs and tables

Do you sometimes feel that you do not fully understand the way that numbers are presented in course materials, newspaper articles and other published material?

What do you consider are your main worries and concerns about your ability to understand and interpret graphs, charts and tables?

Spend a few minutes writing these down before you read on.

One student has said:

I am never quite sure that I
Author(s): The Open University

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Places of Mind: Implications of Narrative Space for the Architecture of Information Environments
Virtual reality and cyberspace are extended spaces of the mind different from, yet related to, the spaces of fiction and ancient myth. These earlier spaces reveal how electronic media, too, may come to define our selves and our culture. Indeed, a better understanding of how we use space to think can lead to the design of better information environments. This paper will describe a range of traditional narrative spaces, revealing their varied relationships with the physical world. It will demonstr
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The Historical Background to the Science - Religion Debate
Talk given by Dr Denis Alexander as part of summer course 1
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2.3 Ways of understanding ‘difference’

The debate about the nature and causes of ethnic, gender and other ‘differences’ is complex and contentious. Here, for the sake of simplicity, two very broad and contrasting perspectives on the issue are presented. Understanding different theoretical perspectives on an issue is important, since these perspectives impact on and influence policy and practice. In this instance, the way in which ‘difference’ is understood has important consequences for how difference is responded to, whet
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8.5 Summary of Section 8

Genes do influence development. However, genes do not always determine the developmental path. The prognosis for Wilson's disease is very good, because environmental intervention is possible. The prognosis for lissencephaly will remain poor for the foreseeable future. For many other characters the relationship with the genome is very complex. Searching for genetic correlates to disease will continue to be a major enterprise, but finding such a correlate should be likened to finding an accompl
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4.2 Diagrams for understanding

Diagrams for understanding are best developed within the creativity phase, though sometimes you can go straight on to using a diagram more suitable to the connectivity phase. Most diagrams for understanding begin at the centre of the sheet of paper and work outwards. Buzan's (1974) spray diagram is built up from an initial idea with its branches; these branches have their own branches and so on until you reach the detail at the end of each twig. This technique is particularly useful fo
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Global Capitalism: January 2016 Monthly Economic Update
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3.3 Examples of rights

Many things have been claimed as rights, as can be seen in the text of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in Table 1. One set of rights is citizenship rights. Primarily concerned with basic constitutional issues, these rights should, in Dworkin's phrase, ‘trump’ other considerations such
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Introduction

This key skill develops your number skills in your studies, work or other activities over a period of time. To tackle all of this key skill, you need to plan your work over at least 3–4 months to give yourself enough time to practise and improve your skills, to seek feedback from others, to monitor your progress and evaluate your strategy and present outcomes.

Application of number (simply called ‘number’ in this key skill) is all about using numerical and mathematical skills to f
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David Willetts MP "The Pinch" Lecture
David Willetts MP Shadow Minister for Universities and Skills presents a lecture at the University of Warwick based on his book "The Pinch: How the baby boomers took their children's future - and why they should give it back".
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Nietzsche's Value Monism - Saying Yes to Everything
Lecture on Nietzsche's attack on Value Dualism, as well as the view he offers instead and whether Nietzsche can sustain his Value Monism-the view that everything is good-given the pressures that pull him back into saying no as well as yes.
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Picky Preschool Eaters
What you can do to help picky eaters eat more healthfully.
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1.3 Vitamin D

The main role of vitamin D is to facilitate the uptake of calcium from food, through the lining of the small intestine into the blood. It also controls the deposition of calcium in the bones during growth and maintains adult bone structure. If vitamin D is deficient, with less calcium available, the skeleton fails to develop normally. The most obvious symptom is the bowing of the leg bones in children, producing the condition called rickets (Author(s): The Open University

Social Media Management Tools That Organize Your Campaign Strategies

Video link (see supported sites below). Please use the original link, not the shortcut, e.g. www.youtube.com/watch?v=abcde

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3.5 Journals

Journals and articles written by academics or experts are an excellent source of information. Journals are usually published monthly or quarterly, and contain a selection of articles providing details of recent research. Often they will also contain reviews of relevant books. They are usually published more quickly than books, and so are often more up to date.

To access content of journals, most publishers require a subscription. There are, however, some journals which you can freely ac
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3.4 Monarchy and the Revolution – the flight to Varennes, 1791

The task of the moderates was further complicated by the ambiguous attitude of the royal family. From the first there were royalists who refused to compromise with the Revolution, including Louis XVI's younger brothers, the comte de Provence (later Louis XVIII) and the comte d'Artois (later Charles X), who left France as émigrés and fomented counter-revolution from abroad. By 1791 half the noble officers in the French army had resigned their commissions. Weak, shifty and out of his depth, L
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2.1 Unique problems and constraints

In an ideal world, projects would be completed on time, within specified budgets and to the standards set out in the plans. In practice, any project involves a set of unique problems and constraints that inevitably create complexity and risk. Plans are liable to change as work progresses, and each stage in the process may have to be revisited several times before completion. Projects do not exist in a vacuum: they often take place in rapidly changing contexts, and the impact of the changing e
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