5.2 Thinking for yourself

These are the kinds of questions you need to ask in order to read critically. As a higher-level student, you don't read simply to ‘find out facts’. It is assumed that you will think for yourself and question what you read and hear. The ‘truth’ is taken to be uncertain, so you weigh up ideas and arguments as you read about them. According to Marton and Saljo (1997, p. 49) research shows that successful students read as if they are constantly asking themselves questions of the kind: ‘
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3.5.1 Try some yourself

Activity 30

Carry out the following calculations, without your calculator.

  • (a) 3 × (60 + 70).

  • (b) (3 × 60) + 70.

  • (c) (70 − 60) ÷ 5.


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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • view solutions as belonging to particular categories, broadly classified as: innovation by context; innovation by practice; routine

  • see how external factors affect engineering projects, and appreciate the range of engineering involved in meeting the basic needs of our society

  • recognise and apply a range of problem-solving techniques from each stage of the engineering design cycle, to include the fol
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Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the August 5th 2017 edition

This week: China stops importing foreign rubbish, a trip to a Disneyfied Paris and how to make better holograms


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Algebra Imaginary and Complex numbers
This fun video gives a brief introduction to the imaginary number in Algebra.
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4.2 Social and political justice

A particularly important set of debates arises in relation to different notions of distributive justice. Do notions of distributive justice apply to the rights of individuals and the acts that they commit, or do they also apply to states of affairs, to the pattern of the results arising from those actions? In the former case, an outcome is just or unjust if it arises from just or unjust actions; whereas in the latter, the principles of justice apply to the pattern of outcomes. This latter not
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Establishing an organic vineyard

A practical guide to setting up your own vineyard. Includes detailed information of trellis building, planting and irrigation technology.
creative commons license

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Distance Formula
This video explains how to derive the distance formula, which is used to find the straight distance between two points in a coordinate plane, by Using what we know about the Pythagorean theorem. The distance formula is a standard formula that allows us to plug a set of coordinates into the formula and easily calculate the distance between the two. (4:26)
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Volume of a Cone | Khan Academy
We are surrounded by space. And that space contains lots of things. And these things have shapes. In geometry we are concerned with the nature of these shapes, how we define them, and what they teach us about the world at large--from math to architecture to biology to astronomy (and everything in between). Learning geometry is about more than just taking your medicine ("It's good for you!"), it's at the core of everything that exists--including you. Having said all that, some of the specific top
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Music Video: Ne-Yo: Transformer 'H'
Ne-Yo and Jessica sing about all the letter sounds the letter -h- can transform. The goal for this segment is transformer 'H'. (01:16)
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VUCast Newscast: Cool cap saves baby
This Week on VUCast, Vanderbilt’s weekly newscast highlighting research, experts, students, sports and everything Vanderbilt: How Cool Cap saves babies’ lives ESPN College GameDay visits Memorial Gym Why storyline wins over sensationalism in commercials Two Vandy students become TV stars!
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Rights not set

Stage 7: Option testing (how well will each work?)

While the identified objectives and constraints have been referred to constantly during the development stage, the testing stage of the approach is a more formal analysis of each option. Its objective is to determine whether:

  • the option will meet the operational objectives

  • it is technically feasible

  • it is organisationally feasible

  • it will meet the financial objectives.


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Norwegians/Norway
Norway has one of the highest standards of living in the world, it is rich in natural resources. For Norwegians, you are not truly wealthy until you can strick a balance that leaves plenty of time for play with family and friends.  Video is good quality and appropriate for all students.
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Acknowledgements

This course was written by Dr Sean Crawford

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions), this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the fo
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6.2.2 Threats and vulnerabilities

A hacker who threatens your organisation's information assets is taking advantage of vulnerabilities in the media and systems which handle them. Vulnerabilities and threats clearly go hand-in-hand: each threat is directed at a vulnerability.

The relationship between information assets, threats, vulnerabilities and existing defences is illustrated in Author(s): The Open University

Defrag Tools #96 - Writing a Debugger Extension Part 1 | Defrag Tools

In this episode of Defrag Tools, Andrew Richards and Chad Beeder start a new series on writing a Debugger Extension for the Debugging Tools for Windows. The series is based on a 3 part MSDN Magazine series that Andrew wrote back in early 2011.

Resources:
Writing a Debugging Tools for Windows Extension - Part 1 - March 2011
Author(s): Andrew Richards, Chad Beeder

Acknowledgements

This course was written by Dr Debbie Brunton.

This free course is an adapted extract from the course A218 Medicine and Society in Europe, 1500–1930, which is currently out of presentation

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions), this content is made available under a Author(s): The Open University

Hare Krishna - Distinctions
This last part of the interview to Mr Dasa refers to the image of God. He explains the importance of the statue images. He also refers to Jesus as an spiritual leader.
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3.1 Definition, properties and some applications

In the previous section we saw how to add two vectors and how to multiply a vector by a scalar, but we did not consider how to multiply two vectors. There are two different ways in which we can multiply two vectors, known as the dot product (or scalar product) and the vector product. They are given these names because the result of the first is a scalar and the result of the second is a vector. (We shall not consider vector products in this course.)

In the audio sec
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1.5.9 Plagiarism

Referencing is not only useful as a way of sharing information, but also as a means of ensuring that due credit is given to other people’s work. In the electronic information age, it is easy to copy and paste from journal articles and web pages into your own work. But if you do use someone else’s work, you should acknowledge the source by giving a correct reference.

Taking someone's work and not indicating where you took it from is termed plagiarism and is regarded as an infringemen
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