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Introduction

This free course, Squares, roots and powers, reminds you about powers of numbers, such as squares and square roots. In particular, powers of 10 are used to express large and small numbers in a convenient form, known as scientific notation, which is used by scientific calculators.

This OpenLearn course provides a sample of level 1 study in Author(s): The Open University

3.6.2 Try some yourself

Activity 36

Without using your calculator, find the following:

  • (a) 100.001 + 10.1

  • (b) 100.001 − 10.1


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4.4 Histograms and scatterplots: summary

Two common graphical displays, most frequently used for continuous data (arising from measurements), have been introduced in this section. A histogram is in a sense a development of the idea of a bar chart. A set of continuous data is divided up into groups, the frequencies in the groups are found, and a histogram is produced by drawing vertical bars, without gaps between them, whose heights are proportional to the frequencies in the groups. You have seen that the shape of a histogram drawn f
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3.2 Pie charts: Nuclear power stations

Figure 2 shows a pie chart of the number of nuclear power stations in countries where nuclear power is used, based on the data from Author(s): The Open University

3.4 Did I make a rough estimate to act as a check?

When using a calculator many people have ‘blind
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3.4 Cylinders and shapes with a uniform cross-section

An important idea when calculating volumes of simple shapes is that of a cross-section. In the case of the rectangular box considered above, it is possible to slice through the box horizontally so that the sliced area is exactly the same as the area of the base or top; in other words, the areas of the horizontal cross-sections are equal.

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2.1 Geometric shapes – triangles

This section deals with the simplest geometric shapes and their symmetries. All of the shapes are two-dimensional – hence they can be drawn accurately on paper.

Simple geometric shapes are studied in mathematics partly because they are used in thousands of practical applications. For instance, triangles occur in bridges, pylons and, more mundanely, in folding chairs; rectangles occur in windows, cinema screens and sheets of paper; while circles are an essential part of wheels, gears a
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Environment: journeys through a changing world
Genetically, mountain gorillas are amongst our closest living relatives, and also one of the world's most endangered species. Half the world's remaining population survive in the forests of Uganda. This album explores the challenges facing conservationists at Bwindi Impenetrable National Park. Known for its exceptional biodiversity, the Park became a major tourist destination when it opened for gorilla tourism in 1993. The problem is, because the Park lies in the heart of one of the most densely
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Water in Ethiopia
In Ethiopia, 65% of people don’t have access to clean drinking water. In this album we take a glimpse at the struggles Ethiopians go through each day, just to survive. We look closely at the different methods used to improve the quality of life in the rural highlands as well as the conflict between neighbouring farming villages attempting to share the same water supply. This material forms part of the course U116 Environment: journeys through a changing world.Author(s): The OpenLearn team

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Culture and Climate Change
Every generation faces challenges that previous generations could scarcely imagine. Twenty years ago, few people were talking about climate change, now it's one of the most hotly-contested areas in politics. How do artists, writers, musicians and broadcasters respond when a new subject appears that is as large and significant as this? What kind of novels, plays, paintings, sculptures, movies and music begin to emerge?Author(s): The OpenLearn team

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Studying Darwin
This course is of interest to anyone wishing to study Darwin’s theory of evolution and natural selection and how his work has gone on to influence other work around this theory. First published on Fri, 04 Mar 2016 as Studying Darwin. To find out more
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Evolution through natural selection
In this free course, Evolution through natural selection, we describe the theory of evolution by natural selection as proposed by Charles Darwin in his book, first published in 1859, On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, or The Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life. We will look at natural selection as Darwin did, taking inheritance for granted, but ignoring the mechanisms underlying it. Author(s): Creator not set

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Studying mammals: Chisellers
Ever wondered why rats, mice and squirrels seem to reproduce at such an alarming rate? Rodents are among the most successful of all the mammal groups. In this free course, Studying mammals: Chisellers, you will learn more about some of the evolutionary features that make these creatures so plentiful. This is the third course in the Studying mammals series.
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Studying mammals: Plant predators
From the mouse-deer to the elephant, plant eaters come in all shapes and sizes. But how do they manage to flourish on a salad diet? In this free course, Studying mammals: Plant predators, we will examine the special features that allow them to extract their nutrients from leaves, and see how some plants protect themselves from these predators. This is the fourth course in the Studying mammals series. Author(s): Creator not set

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Introduction

This free course provides a sample of postgraduate study in Technology http://www.open.ac.uk/ postgraduate/ find/ technology.

This course comprises: the transformation process mo
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Unclear about nuclear?
Young people (18+) who are interested in but unsure about entering the nuclear industry will find assistance in this free course, Unclear about nuclear? It will help develop their understanding of nuclear energy, improve their study and maths skills in a nuclear context and aid them in investigating further training (within and beyond the OU) or employment opportunities in the nuclear industry. Author(s): Creator not set

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'Land grab': an environmental issue?
This free course, 'Land grab': an environmental issue?, explores how environmental problems are entangled with economic and political issues and offers tools for making sense of the complexity that results. The case of land grab illustrates how everyday issues such as food prices are caught up in connections that link different places, different people and their livelihoods across the globe; connections that are brought to life in the course through rich audio-visual material and interactive act
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Exploring philosophy: faking nature
Commercial exploitation of nature, such as mining, fracking, or generating hydro-electric power, often damages the way the natural environment looks. What if the environment could be restored to exactly how it looked before? Would that mean that no damage had been done, that the natural environment was as valuable as it had been before the commercial exploitation? This free course, Exploring philosophy: faking nature, examines ‘the restoration thesis’, and provides an insight into philosophi
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Eutrophication
Managing eutrophication is a key element in maintaining the earths biodiversity. Eutrophication is a process mostly associated with human activity whereby ecosystems accumulate minerals. This free course, Eutrophication, explains how this process occurs, what its effects on different types of habitat are, and how it might be managed. First published on Mo
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2.5.2 Environmental indicators

The notion of a link between climatic conditions and the behaviour of plants and animals (e.g. the growth of trees or coral) and the composition of natural communities or ecosystems (the type of vegetation in a given area, say) is fundamental to the use of proxy data to reconstruct past climates. Some examples of biological responses to recent climate change were included in Box 9. Here we should be wary of jumping to conclusions. Such changes involve complex living systems that can respond i
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