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Introduction

In this unit you will consider key developments in the English language from the end of the fifteenth century to the nineteenth century. You will study how the social and political changes of this period affected the English language as well as the development of new tools and ways of thinking about language.

Firstly, however, some useful ‘tools of the trade’ – you'll take a look at some vital foundations of English grammar.

This material is from our archive and is an adapt
Author(s): The Open University

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Übung 15

Lesen Sie die folgenden Informationen über zwei Bräuche, die in Norddeutschland gepflegt werden, und beantworten Sie die Fragen.

Junggesellen werden mit Treppenfege
Author(s): The Open University

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Übung 8

Lesen Sie, wie die Stadt Annaberg entstanden sein soll, und machen Sie sich Notizen zu den folgenden Punkten:

  • Beschreibung Daniel Knappes und seiner Familie;

  • Beschreibung des Traums;


    Author(s): The Open University

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Checklist of common features

  • Is there any online help?

  • Can I do a simple search?

  • Can I look at the information in both short and detailed form?

  • Can I choose where in the record I want my search terms to be found?

  • Can I search for phrases?

  • Can I combine search terms?

  • Can I use truncation?

  • Can I use wildcards?

  • Can I do an advanced search?

  • Can I get a list
    Author(s): The Open University

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2.2 Using specific or general questions

Notice the difference between closed questions and open questions.

Closed questions

These questions are very specific and the answers give precise information.

  • Are there sites available?

  • Yes.

  • Has it got air conditioning?

  • No.

  • Where is Preston?

  • In the north-west of England.

  • What's the population?

  • 128
    Author(s): The Open University

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Children living in different settings
Most children live with a parent or parents, with siblings and relatives and with family pets in the family home, but many children do not live with their parents or even with their families. They may live elsewhere through choice or necessity, but whatever the event that causes them to move away from their parents or families, the significance of moving in a child’s life can be considerable. This material will be of interest to anyone who supports children who live away from their families in
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Active, healthy lifestyles
In this unit, aimed at teachers of Physical Education, we begin by looking at some of the common misconceptions relating to fitness and activity levels together with accepted definitions of these concepts. We consider how active young people should actually be, and discuss how PE teachers can ensure they are making an effective contribution to this area of public health.Author(s): Creator not set

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Imaging in medicine
X-rays, CT scans and MRI scans are all medical imaging techniques of great practical importance that have been encountered by a great many people in their medical histories. This unit illustrates how these techniques work – and their limitations and advantages. First published on Tue, 09 Aug 2011 as Author(s): Creator not set

Introducing public health
This unit introduces some key elements of public health and health promotion, using a video case study of Coventry. It focuses on the major determinants of health and ill health and the scope of public health work. First published on Tue, 04 Dec 2012 as Author(s): Creator not set

The Ancient Olympics: Bridging past and present
This unit highlights the similarities and differences between our modern Games and the Ancient Olympics and explores why today, as we prepare for London's 2012 Olympics, we still look back at the Classical world for meaning and inspiration. First published on Tue, 04 Dec 2012 as Author(s): Creator not set

4.4 Where does gender come from?

Activity 15

0 hours 20 minutes

2.9 Experiencing prejudice and discrimination

Activity 4

0 hours 20 minutes

2.7.3 Identities have different and changing meanings

Aspects of identity may have different meanings at different times in people's lives, and the meanings that they attribute to aspects of their identity (for example, ethnicity) may be different from the meaning it has for others (for example, being black may be a source of pride for you, but the basis of someone else's negative stereotyping).


Author(s): The Open University

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2.3 Ways of understanding ‘difference’

The debate about the nature and causes of ethnic, gender and other ‘differences’ is complex and contentious. Here, for the sake of simplicity, two very broad and contrasting perspectives on the issue are presented. Understanding different theoretical perspectives on an issue is important, since these perspectives impact on and influence policy and practice. In this instance, the way in which ‘difference’ is understood has important consequences for how difference is responded to, whet
Author(s): The Open University

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4 Exploring the explanations

At this point the emphasis of the discussion changes somewhat. We are going to use three case studies to illustrate some of the problems and difficulties that parents can face in their day-to-day lives. After reviewing the case studies you will be asked to reflect on some possible reasons and explanations for the situations outlined.


Author(s): The Open University

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3.1 Needing help

Some people will cope with parenting without the need for additional support, some will need some help at some time, while for others parenting may be a task which appears to overwhelm them. Some individuals are affected by circumstances which make them more likely to require support or assistance. In this section we explore these issues in more detail.

Author(s): The Open University

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1.3 People involved in parenting

Another interesting question remains: can only a parent or parents provide these necessities? (We are leaving on one side for the moment the issue of which parent.) Clearly the answer has to be no. There are many examples of people involved in parenting who are not a child's parents. For example:

  • step-parents

  • grandparents

  • aunts and uncles

  • brothers and sisters

  • friends


  • Author(s): The Open University

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2 Community

As you've just seen, ‘community’, an ever present word, evokes some contrasting meanings. It has been described as a ‘keyword’, that is, a word which has its own particular history but which also plays a significant role in putting across different meanings. Identifying a keyword is to go further than just giving a dictionary definition because:

Keywords have been more than ways of seeing: they have been influe
Author(s): The Open University

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1.3 Regulations on visiting patients in Lennox Castle, c.1950


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References

Department of Health (1989)An Introduction to the Children Act 1989, HMSO, London.
Welsh, I. (1993)Trainspotting, Minerva, London.

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