Pages 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302 303 304 305 306 307 308 309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 350 351 352 353 354 355 356 357 358 359 360 361 362 363 364 365 366 367 368 369 370 371 372 373 374 375 376 377 378 379 380 381 382 383 384 385 386 387 388 389 390 391 392 393 394 395 396 397 398 399 400 7995 result(s) returned

Distance Formula
This video explains how to derive the distance formula, which is used to find the straight distance between two points in a coordinate plane, by Using what we know about the Pythagorean theorem. The distance formula is a standard formula that allows us to plug a set of coordinates into the formula and easily calculate the distance between the two. (4:26)
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

Volume of a Cone | Khan Academy
We are surrounded by space. And that space contains lots of things. And these things have shapes. In geometry we are concerned with the nature of these shapes, how we define them, and what they teach us about the world at large--from math to architecture to biology to astronomy (and everything in between). Learning geometry is about more than just taking your medicine ("It's good for you!"), it's at the core of everything that exists--including you. Having said all that, some of the specific top
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

Music Video: Ne-Yo: Transformer 'H'
Ne-Yo and Jessica sing about all the letter sounds the letter -h- can transform. The goal for this segment is transformer 'H'. (01:16)
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

VUCast Newscast: Cool cap saves baby
This Week on VUCast, Vanderbilt’s weekly newscast highlighting research, experts, students, sports and everything Vanderbilt: How Cool Cap saves babies’ lives ESPN College GameDay visits Memorial Gym Why storyline wins over sensationalism in commercials Two Vandy students become TV stars!
Author(s): Vanderbilt News and Communications

License information
Related content

Rights not set

Stage 7: Option testing (how well will each work?)

While the identified objectives and constraints have been referred to constantly during the development stage, the testing stage of the approach is a more formal analysis of each option. Its objective is to determine whether:

  • the option will meet the operational objectives

  • it is technically feasible

  • it is organisationally feasible

  • it will meet the financial objectives.


Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

Norwegians/Norway
Norway has one of the highest standards of living in the world, it is rich in natural resources. For Norwegians, you are not truly wealthy until you can strick a balance that leaves plenty of time for play with family and friends.  Video is good quality and appropriate for all students.
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

Acknowledgements

This course was written by Dr Sean Crawford

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions), this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the fo
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

6.2.2 Threats and vulnerabilities

A hacker who threatens your organisation's information assets is taking advantage of vulnerabilities in the media and systems which handle them. Vulnerabilities and threats clearly go hand-in-hand: each threat is directed at a vulnerability.

The relationship between information assets, threats, vulnerabilities and existing defences is illustrated in Author(s): The Open University

Acknowledgements

This course was written by Dr Debbie Brunton.

This free course is an adapted extract from the course A218 Medicine and Society in Europe, 1500–1930, which is currently out of presentation

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions), this content is made available under a Author(s): The Open University

Hare Krishna - Distinctions
This last part of the interview to Mr Dasa refers to the image of God. He explains the importance of the statue images. He also refers to Jesus as an spiritual leader.
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

3.1 Definition, properties and some applications

In the previous section we saw how to add two vectors and how to multiply a vector by a scalar, but we did not consider how to multiply two vectors. There are two different ways in which we can multiply two vectors, known as the dot product (or scalar product) and the vector product. They are given these names because the result of the first is a scalar and the result of the second is a vector. (We shall not consider vector products in this course.)

In the audio sec
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

1.5.9 Plagiarism

Referencing is not only useful as a way of sharing information, but also as a means of ensuring that due credit is given to other people’s work. In the electronic information age, it is easy to copy and paste from journal articles and web pages into your own work. But if you do use someone else’s work, you should acknowledge the source by giving a correct reference.

Taking someone's work and not indicating where you took it from is termed plagiarism and is regarded as an infringemen
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2015 The Open University

Killdeer Preening and Feeding
This short video gives excellent real life footage of a Killdeer preening and feeding in shallow water. This is a great resource to help build background knowledge and to help make real world connections between nature and the classroom. (0:41)
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

COMP1216 - Problem class 8
COMP1216 - Problem class 8 - Profile Picture Prof Michael Butler
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

WGS.SP.400 Special Topics in Women & Gender Studies Seminar: Latina Women's Voices (MIT)
This course will explore the rich diversity of women's voices and experiences as reflected in writings and films by and about Latina writers, filmmakers, and artists. Through close readings, class discussions and independently researched student presentations related to each text, we will explore not only the unique, individual voice of the writer, but also the cultural, social and political contexts which inform their narratives. We will also examine the roles that gender, familial ties and soc
Author(s): King, Sarah E.

License information
Related content

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative C

3.1 Using diagrams from course materials or other sources

So far in this course we have been looking at how you can improve your understanding of other people's texts and diagrams. I have shown you some study techniques that you can use to ‘translate’ text into diagrams and diagrams into meaningful text. However, this discussion has been focused on what you can do for yourself. At some point, you'll have to produce assignments that require, or will be enhanced by, the use of diagrams. One of the first decisions you'll face is whether to use an e
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2015 The Open University

1 Understanding how you learn

This Key Skill Assessment Course offers an opportunity for you to select and prepare work that demonstrates your key skills in the area of: improving your own learning and performance.

This course provides you with advice and information on how to go about presenting your key skills work as a portfolio.

In presenting work that demonstrates your key skills you are taking the initiative to show that you can develop and improve a particular set of skills, and are able to use your ski
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

4.2 ATM layers

In this section I shall briefly review some of the main functions of the ATM layers but I shall not go into too much detail because at this stage we are interested in only the general points about protocols.


Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

7 The Enlightenment and nature

The sublime was potentially subversive of the Enlightenment mindset, which focused mainly on the power of human intelligence to grasp and explain the natural world, and indeed to discover natural causes of phenomena previously considered supernatural. There were, for example, frequent attempts to demystify the ‘miracles’ narrated in the Bible, since the violation of the laws of nature which a miracle implied was a physical impossibility and a contradiction in terms. The Marquis de Sade wa
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2013 The Open University