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4.1 Constant human nature

Just as with other natural phenomena, Enlightenment thinkers came to the conclusion as a result of observation that human nature itself was a basic constant. In other words, it possessed common characteristics and was subject to universal, verifiable laws of cause and effect. As Hume put it:

Mankind are so much the same, in all times and places, that history informs us of nothing new or strange in this particular.
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Myths persist

Many myths still surround the Tay Bridge disaster, the most pervasive being it was brought down by wind action alone. Rothery's report (see Paper 3) should dispel that particular myth, in addition to the numerous examples shown in this unit of the way the structure had deteriorated by the time of the storm in late 1879.

Click 'View document' below to open Paper 3 (35 pages, 39 MB).

Econometría II
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Introduction

‘Tough on the causes of crime.’ A famous phrase, but what is crime? This unit examines how we as a ‘society’ define crime. You will look at the fear that is generated within communities and what evidence is available to support claims that are made about crime rates.

This material is from our archive and is an adapted extract from Introducing the social sciences (DD100) which is no longer taught by The Open University. If you want to study formally with us, you may wish t
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Changes in Ecosystems - by StudyJams
Ecosystems are constantly going through gradual changes.  Sometimes those changes are natural, and sometimes they are caused by humans.  Learn more about changes in an ecosystem with this cartoon animation from StudyJams.  A short, self-checking quiz is also included with this link.
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Loop Recording and Comping in Logic - Part 5 of 7 - Composing and Producing Electronic Music
Download Loudon's Session Files for Free at: http://bit.ly/HPCEBG Part 5: Loop Recording and Comping in Logic: Performing with Massive and the Maschine Controller while loop Recording in Logic In this seven-part music production clinic, Professor Loudon Stearns goes in-depth into Dubstep and electro synth textures, featuring Native Instrument's Massive and Maschine, iZotope Ozone, and more. Loudon Stearns is the Course Author and Instructor of Berkleemusic's online course Composing and Produc
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Finding the Surface Area of a Cone
The instructor uses an electric chalkboard to demonstrate how to find the surface area of a cone.  The formula is given and a step-by-step approach is modeled showing what values to plug in for the radius and height and the computational steps are shown. (03:23)

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2.2 Pressure in the atmosphere

The sounds we hear generally consist of rapid fluctuations of air pressure in the atmosphere that surrounds us. Sound can also be transmitted through other media, for instance water, so not all sound consists of fluctuations in air pressure. However, for the purposes of this discussion I shall confine myself to sound in air.

These fluctuations in air pressure are caused by a local disturbance to the air pressure, which might be sudden and transient – for example, when a paper bag is b
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4.5.6 Catalyst deterioration: summary

  1. An ability to withstand mild deactivation is built into the design of the catalytic converter. However, severe deactivation could prevent the system from meeting emissions legislation.

  2. The major causes of deactivation are thermal damage and poisoning.

  3. High temperatures may cause sintering of the metals and/or the support; this can be prevented to some extent by the addition of ceria as a structural promoter. Damaging interaction
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Lesson 04 - One Minute Luxembourgish
In lesson 04 of One Minute Luxembourgish you will learn how to say that you don't understand something. Remember - even a few phrases of a language can help you make friends and enjoy travel more. Find out more about One Minute Languages at our website - http://www.oneminutelanguages.com. One Minute Luxembourgish is brought to you by the Radio Lingua Network and is ©Copyright 2008.Author(s): No creator set

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Geographic Regions
This video discusses the geographic regions of the United States. It describes the different regions, where they are, and what the landscape is like. Video is of good quality and appropriate for students studying the United States Regions.(Amateur video)

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Power Pose
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© 2000–2017 The Metropolitan Museum of Art. All rights reserved.

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Corporate Governance unveiled
This Oxford at Said seminar was dedicated to the topic of corporate Governance. Professor Colin Mayer speaks on the role of investors in corporate governance; Professor Paul Davies covers the current debate about executive compensation. Good corporate governance rules are supposed to align the interests of management, shareholders and society. The value destruction caused by the recent financial crisis has brought reforming corporate governance back to the very top of the political agenda. Many
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References

Entwistle, N. (1997) ‘Contrasting perspectives on learning’ in Marton, F., Hounsell, D. and Entwistle, N. (eds) The Experience of Learning: Implications for teaching and studying in Higher Education, Edinburgh, Scottish Academic Press Limited.
Marton, F. and R. Saljo (1997) ‘Approaches to learning’ in Marton, F., Hounsell, D. and Entwistle, N. (eds) The Experience of Learning: Implications for teachi
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Solutions of the Question Bank of 4EC111.
Bijay_Kumar Sharma
The gives the solution of the Question Bank 4EC111 uploaded as m54985
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4.1.4 Summary

  • Identity is based on being the same as some people and different from others.

  • Identities are constructed in relation to place.

  • Difference is unequally weighted and can create categories of outsiders.

  • Individuals and groups have to negotiate both the uncertainties of social change and the constraints of inequality.


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1.3 Psychology has social impact

The relevance of psychology to everyday concerns, and the ease with which it can be popularised and used, mean that psychological knowledge – some of it dubious, some of it accurate – is continually absorbed into culture and often incorporated into the very language we use. Examples of psychological concepts that have entered popular discourse include the notion that we are predisposed, both through evolution and through the functioning of our brains and nervous systems, to behave in cert
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The Expenditure-Output Model
OpenStax College Principles of Economics for AP® Courses

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Aprendiendo del cine: Evaluaci?n de c?digos formales y estrategias narrativas en una instalaci?n de
Architectural animations often evidence limitations when trying to get across our design intensions in terms of the experiencing of a place. When architects design a space, they propose not only geometry and space functionality, All in all, any architectural design implies a way of experiencing the space. But how can we communicate it? Narrative films developed - in the last century - communication conventions that allow the audience to feel transported to the time and place of the movie. Howeve
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SWIB12 - Status Quo and Limitations of Library Linked Data (Daniel Vila-Suero)
By: SWIB Status Quo and Limitations of Library Linked Data, Asunción Gómez-Pérez, Phillip Cimiano, Daniel Vila-Suero, OEG-UPM (Ontology Engineering Group – Universidad Politécnica de Madrid)
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