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2.1 Unique problems and constraints

In an ideal world, projects would be completed on time, within specified budgets and to the standards set out in the plans. In practice, any project involves a set of unique problems and constraints that inevitably create complexity and risk. Plans are liable to change as work progresses, and each stage in the process may have to be revisited several times before completion. Projects do not exist in a vacuum: they often take place in rapidly changing contexts, and the impact of the changing e
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4.4 Questioning what you read

Another way to keep your mind active while you read is to ask yourself questions about what you are reading.


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6.1 Controlling things

As you learned in Section 1, computers can collect, process, store and distribute information. This section shows that they can also be used to:

  • control machines and simple mechanisms;

  • conduct a special kind of commerce: selling on the web.

Let us examine more closely that common household appliance, the automatic washing machine. Virtually all such machines sold in the last decade or so are controlled using a microcomput
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1.4.1 Introduction

Up to now I have focused on the claims of the antisweatshop movement and the counter-claims of those who contest the purely negative conclusions drawn about the exploitation of another country's poor. To that end, I have, at various moments, touched on issues of demands to take responsibility: whether, for instance, responsibility for sweatshops should be divided up in some way between all those connected to the market system which gives rise to them, or placed firmly at the door of the big r
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Learn the Planets Song
In this video, young students will learn the basics of space science, planets, stars, and the solar system we live in. This is a fun cool science introduction into the cosmos and the planets. This is a great resource to use in conjunction with non-fiction texts and/or unit on the Solar System. (3:46)
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3.4 Probability currents

The expressions we have derived for reflection and transmission coefficients were based on the assumption that the intensity of a beam is the product of the speed of its particles and their linear number density. This assumption seems very natural from the viewpoint of classical physics, but we should always be wary about carrying over classical ideas into quantum physics. In this section we shall establish a general quantum-mechanical formula for the beam intensity. The formula will be consi
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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • describe the relationship between social work practice and the law

  • understand the legal framework that regulates social work in Scotland

  • demonstrate an awareness of the role of law in countering discrimination.


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5 Quick Maths Activities about your Classroom

For numeracy week we are going to be looking at the following questions related to our classroom.  They are simple activities that have a great deal of maths to them and are pretty much suitable to any age group. 


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Celebrating Commencement 2016
#myVanderbilt is celebrating the class of 2016. Hear from grads and families on this awesome day! Read more: Chancellor to graduates: ‘Lift others up’ http://vanderbi.lt/w1r2x Read more Commencement 2016 stories: http://news.vanderbilt.edu/tag/commencement-2016/ Follow Vanderbilt on Twitter: https://twitter.com/vanderbiltu, on Instagram: http://instagram.com/vanderbiltu and on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vanderbilt. See all Vanderbilt social media at http://social.vanderbilt.edu.
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Crashed aircraft EAW014625

*

The wreckage of a Douglas Invader A-26B light bomber at Warton Bank, Lancashire. Photographed by Aerofilms on 21st April 1948. This plane crashed on 29th November 1944 shortly after take-off. The story is outlined here: http://laituk.org/Time%20Team.htm.
© Historic England


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Waiting times between geyser eruptions

Figure 20 shows a histogram of waiting times, varying from about 40 minutes to about 110 minutes.

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Environmental Ethics
To what extent does Man have a right to exploit nature in order to live? Do animals have rights? Should we modify the genes of crops if it allows us to increase production, and even alleviate poverty? This album explores the arguments for and against genetically-modified crops, hearing the views of a dairy farmer competing in the global market, a GM scientist, an activist who believes GM crops are unsustainable, and an organic cultivator. The various views reveal how the debate is made complex b
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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • read closely – analyse a passage from the play

  • examine genre – what kind of play is Doctor Faustus?

  • consider themes – what are the main themes or issues explored in the play?

  • read historically – what are some of the connections between Doctor Faustus and the historical period in which it was written?

  • read biographically – what, if any, insights d
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5 The Scopes monkey trial

This section was written by Gary Slapper.

In 2007, Professor Michael Reiss, a Church of England priest and the head of science at London's Institute of Education, said that it is becoming more difficult to teach evolution in schools because of the spread of creationism. Similar debate has long been burning in the United States. Also in 2007, a creationist museum opened near Cincinnati, where children in animal skins play amid model dinosaurs, suggesting they once coexisted and th
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Lesson 2 - Saying 'Goodbye'
How do you say 'Goodbye' in Russian? This show teaches you a couple of ways to do that. As you listen, the images below will help you visually.




- Пока, Эмили.
- Пока, мам.



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Acknowledgements

The content acknowledged below is Proprietary (see terms and conditions). This content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission to reproduce material in thi
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Bio-technology in Africa - Florence Wambugu
Florence Muringi Wambugu talks about the contribution of bio-technology, including GM crops, for improving the sustainable livelihoods of resource poor families in Africa.
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Babbage: What can science do for my garden?
The Royal Botanic Gardens Kew has unlocked the DNA sequence of thousands of plants. Is the ability to manipulate colour and smell good news for the worldwide floral industry? Also: Pests and pathogens thriving in a warmer climate could wipe out our woodlands. And is Kew’s Millennium Seed Bank the ultimate horticultural insurance policy for the planet? Kenneth Cukier hosts.
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Williamsburg and the American Revolution
Brief introductory video for Williamsburg, then capitol of Virginia, and the events leading up to the Revolutionary War
Run time 02:09

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Introduction

Sorley Maclean (1911–1998) is now regarded as one of the greatest Scottish poets of the twentieth century. However, until the 1970s, his verse was known by very few people. In that decade, publication of English translations of his work and the impact of his public readings established him in the eyes of poetry lovers in Scotland, Ireland and England, as well as further afield, as a major poet.

This material is from our archive and is an adapted extract from Literature in the moder
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