3.7 Analysing and reporting the results

When planning what data to use in the evaluation it is helpful to consider how the data will be analysed. Usually, there are a lot of data, perhaps in several different forms. If you have set clear objectives, it should be possible to identify the data that are relevant to each issue. It is usual to follow the steps below:

  • consider numbers, for example how much has been achieved at what cost;

  • consider quality, whether appropriate and
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IPL: DNA and disease - following a common thread
"DNA and disease - following a common thread", Professor Martin Kennedy's IPL
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Learning outcomes

By the end of this unit you should be able to:

  • demonstrate an awareness of current media and policy discourses surrounding young people's physical and mental health;

  • critically analyse ideas about young people's wellbeing using a range of theoretical perspectives;

  • demonstrate an understanding of some of the ways in which young people's experience of mental health is shaped by diversity and inequality;

  • demonstrate an awareness of diffe
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Competing Memories: Truth and Reconciliation in Sierra Leone and Peru
Rebekka Friedman (King’s College London) gives a talk for the OTJR Seminar Series. https://www.law.ox.ac.uk/events/competing-memories-truth-and-reconciliation-sierra-leone-and-peru
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SAT Prep: Test 4, Section 8, Part 3
Students, improve your math SAT score! The instructor uses an electronic chalkboard to model problems.  This video is appropriate for high school students. Uses a textbook (the official SAT study guide) commonly found in bookstores, but it is not absolutely necessary as the narrator does all work on the screen. Problems 12-15 starting on page 614.
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SAT Prep: Test 4, Section 8, Part 2
Students, improve your math SAT score! The instructor uses an electronic chalkboard to model problems. This video is appropriate for high school students. Uses a textbook (the official SAT study guide) commonly found in bookstores, but it is not absolutely necessary as the narrator does all work on the screen.
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3.3 What can genres do for you?

Think of it like this: each genre novel suggests certain char
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Can The Referendum Be Democratic? Reflections On The Brexit Process
Stephen Tierney, Professor of Constitutional Theory in the School of Law, University of Edinburgh, In this FLJS lecture, Stephen Tierney, Professor of Constitutional Theory, University of Edinburgh, discusses the circumstances surrounding the forthcoming referendum on the United Kingdom’s membership of the European Union. We live in an age of direct democracy. Around the world the referendum is used more and more in processes of constitutional formation and change. This lecture will consider w
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Keep on learning

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There are more than 800 courses on OpenLearn for you to choose from on a range of subjects. 

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7.1 Some basic principles of religious studies

Remember that in Section 4 I suggested that possible reasons for studying religion could be clustered together under two broad headings:

  1. to understand the society in which we live, the culture we inherit and the wider world of which we are a part;

  2. as part of a personal quest for religious
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1.2.4 Stage 2: Find a way in

It's easy to be distracted by the surface appearance of a diagram, but we are really interested in the underlying message. This is rather like the distinction made between the content and context reading of photographs. Once you are sure that you know what the main heading means, focus on a particular element and think it through. If it is a bar chart, for instance, pick on one of the bars and tell yourself what it represents, what it is telling you. Is it showing a percentage or a total? Wha
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3.4 Ganymede and Callisto

The images of Ganymede and Callisto in Section 1.11 and Section 1.12 and below demonstrate that ancient icy surfaces can display just as large a range of featu
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Introduction

William Wilberforce, the politician and religious writer, was instrumental in the abolition of slavery in Britain. This course explores Wilberforce’s career and writings and assesses their historical significance. In particular it examines the contribution that Evangelicalism, the religious tradition to which Wilberforce belonged, made in the transitions between the Enlightenment and Romanticism. Throughout it relates Wilberforce’s career and writings to wider social and cultural developm
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6 The Enlightenment on art, genius and the sublime

Enlightenment ideas on art and the creative process were deeply influenced by the contemporary veneration for reason, empiricism and the classics. The business of the artist was conceived of as the imitation of nature, and as far as high art was concerned, this process of imitation should be informed by an intelligent grasp of the processes used to produce classical art. The ancients and their art were seen as models in the judicious selection of the most beautiful elements observed in nature
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Introduction

This unit introduces some philosophical questions concerning the nature of the mind and mental phenomena, such as thoughts, perceptions and emotions. The unit considers what is involved in having a mind, whether there are different kinds of minds, and whether there is some characteristic that is shared by all mental phenomena.

This study unit is an adapted extract from the Open University course AA308 Thought and experience: themes in the philosophy of mind, which is no lo
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5.1.1 SMART objectives

When the objectives are identified, trying to ensure that each objective is SMART (Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic and Timebound) is good practice or at least to have considered the extent to which these conditions could be met. As in all planning, this process is continuous and as new information becomes available and as the project progresses, changes will need to be made to aspects of the objectives and to the sequences of tasks that contribut
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2.4 Worlds in motion: the importance of flows

‘The sea had welled up suddenly through thousands of tiny holes in this atoll's bedrock of coral.’ Do you recall this passage in Lynas's (2003) account of his first days on Tuvalu in Reading 1A? For me, this gives an impression of the islands being quite literally porous, a solid ground that reveals itself, now and again, to be not so solid after all. Lynas offers this particularly striking example of the island's openness to the world around it as evidence of a growing vulnerability that
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7 Unofficial work cultures

The whole issue of bodily care and bodily functions tends to be driven underground and then emerges in jokes or crudeness. Picture this scene, a few months after Marie has started, when she has become more settled within the care team.

It was quite late on a Saturday night and a group of the younger staff
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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • understand what we mean by the entanglements of social welfare and crime control, by exploring the tensions and relations between ‘watching over’ and watching out for’

  • understand policy responses and their relevance to the course

  • identify different kinds of evidence – in particular, visual evidence and interview evidence

  • demonstrate a development of skills in ICT, including h
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Wuthering Heights
This is a song by Kate Bush. It's based on a book; Wuthering Heights written by Emily Brontë! The song words are displayed on the screen as Kate Bush sings.

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