4.2 The industry life cycle

The comparison between the automobile industry and the PC industry makes sense only if we concentrate on similar periods in their evolution. We will concentrate here on the ‘early’ development of both industries, in what will be called the ‘introductory’ and ‘early growth’ phases in their life cycles. This is the period running from 1900 to 1930 in the automobile industry and from 1975 to 2000 in the PC industry. The automobile industry refers here to all firms producing cars and
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4.1 Introduction

As you have now seen, the concept of the ‘new economy’ has inspired a number of studies that compare the effect that new technologies have had on economy-wide productivity in previous eras with the effect that IT has – or has not yet – had in the current era. I shall now ask another question, still along the lines of ‘what's new in the new economy?’, but this time from a more microeconomic perspective, which focuses on the individual firm and industry rather than on the whole econ
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3.3 A summary

I have shown that, while IT has no doubt had an impact on productivity, it is not clear whether this goes beyond the IT-producing sector, or whether the gains will outlast the boom period of the business cycle. With so much debate, whom should we believe? Perhaps, as is often the case, the truth lies somewhere in the middle. The optimistic view highlights the way that IT has transformed society, and how this transformation has in many instances led to growth through the productivity-enhancing
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2.2 The effect of technology on productivity

In each industrial revolution, new inventions radically changed the way that production and distribution were organised, and often led to large and rapid increases in the efficiency of production. The rise of electricity, for example, allowed US productivity to increase in the manufacturing sector (as opposed to the agricultural or service sector) by more than 5 per cent per annum throughout the 1920s.

Let us pause a moment and consider what this means. The term productivity refe
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Introduction

This course takes one aspect of the debate concerning the new economy – innovation in the form of the introduction of information and communication technologies – and places it in the historical context of industrial revolutions. Is the new economy really new or ‘just another’ industrial revolution?

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1 The purpose, efficacy and regulation of prisons

Richard Sparks presents a series of views about the purpose, efficacy and regulation of prisons. The audio programme was recorded in 2001.

Participants in the audio programme were:

  • Richard Sparks Professor of Criminology at the University of Keele and is now Professor of Criminology at the University of Edinburgh;

  • Rod Morgan Professor of Criminal Justice at Bristol University;

  • Larry Viner a Londo
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1 Capturing the oil industry

The oil industry is perhaps the archetypal globalised industry. Dominated by a few multi-national companies, it is highly centralised at the level of corporate power but, like corporations, investment and trade in the oil industry are also highly mobile. The long reach of the global oil economy is a consequence of the distance between the location of significant oil reserves and the location of the major markets for oil. The reserves of oil currently expected to last more than fifty years are
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3.3 Compression

The previous section mentioned the large file size of bit-map representations of even small pictures. Therefore just a few images use up a great deal of storage space. This can be inconvenient for PC users, but in the case of a digital camera it presents a real problem. In addition, it is becoming increasingly popular to send digital pictures as email attachments, or via mobile phones using multimedia messaging services (MMS), but large files take a long time to transmit.

The way round
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6 Correlation

Activity 5

0 hours 20 minutes

This activity demonstrates how a simple correlation analysis can be carried out. Correlations tell us about the relationship between pairs of variabl
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References

Entwistle, N. (1997) ‘Contrasting perspectives on learning’ in Marton, F., Hounsell, D. and Entwistle, N. (eds) The Experience of Learning: Implications for teaching and studying in Higher Education, Edinburgh, Scottish Academic Press Limited.
Marton, F. and R. Saljo (1997) ‘Approaches to learning’ in Marton, F., Hounsell, D. and Entwistle, N. (eds) The Experience of Learning: Implications for teachi
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5.1 The values represented by the text

As we have seen, you are fully immersed in the text while you try to discover how it works and what it is about. But in order to make some judgements of it you have to shift your stance a bit. You have to ‘stand back’, as it were, and ask yourself: What do I think about these things I have discovered?

Basically, you need to ask two kinds of question about the text's ‘value’:

  1. What values are represented in the
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4.1.2 When is a line graph not a good format to use?

When you have a large amount of data without an obvious link. For example, when your data shows shares of a whole, in which case, you would use a pie chart.


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Cognitive Psychology
The consciousness of the human mind has long been a topic of fascination and curiosity amongst writers, artists and psychologists, from Carl Jung and Salvador Dali to Virginia Wolfe and Gertrude Stein. This album explores our understanding of consciousness, and features a discussion on some of psychology's most complex questions: what does it mean to be a conscious human, and what purposes our consciousness serves. This material forms part of The Open University course DD303 Cognitive psychology
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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

1 Object-based learning

Harnessing the power of original, real things, that's what learning in museums is all about …

Osborne (2004)

Pupils are handling a Second World War gas mask. This is part of their work on the Home Front. They can feel the weight of the gas mask and smell the stifling warmth of the mask on their face. This gives them a depth of understanding that nothing else could. For the moment they are
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2 Book reviews

The comments below all relate to the same book, Ruby Holler by Sharon Creech, and have been made by pupils at Churchill Community School, North Somerset – the ‘Churchill Chatterboxes’.

A captivating yet far-fetched book, I feel this would suit most younger readers but older readers would want something more demanding. (Margaret)

I think Ruby Holler is a very moving book, especially when Da
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3.1 The Athenians, the Swiss, and Arnold Schwarzenegger

Abraham Lincoln defined democracy as rule of, by and for the people.

If democracy is such a good thing, why don't voters get to decide on policies as well as just vote for candidates? Some countries practise ‘direct democracy’, where people can vote on policy, alongside ‘representative democracy’, where we choose others to decide for us. When democracy was invented, in ancient Athens, it was direct democracy – citizens met face-to-face to make decisions for the city-state (tho
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Introducción

In this session you are going to learn how to ask about different places of interest in Spain, Chile and Uruguay: what they are, where they are and what they look like.

Key learning points

  • Asking and answering where a monument or a building is

  • Describing a building

  • Using estar to indicate location


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1.4 Actividad

Actividad 1.4

1 Look at the following pictures and write two sentences describing each building. Use the nouns and adjectives from the boxes below, and don't forget to put the appropriate endings! You can either use the co
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1.3 Actividad

Vocabulario

puente(el) bridge
inacabado unfinished
jardines (los) gardens
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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • describe places in Spanish

  • give and understand directions in Spanish

  • talk about urban transport in Spanish

  • navigate around a building in Spain.


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