6 And action!

Getting the cameras rolling is just the beginning – there are endless possibilities you can explore.

As a visual medium, DV lends itself to the creative expression of ideas, feelings and information, but it is harder to define what constitutes creativity.

It's easy to equate a creative medium with a lack of constraints – an ‘anything goes’ attitude. In BECTA's pilot study, however, teachers reported that placing clear constraints on pupils’ coursework generated the best
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Acknowledgements

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Author

Sue Platt has been a school governor for 21 years, at both primary and secondary p
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Learning outcomes

The aim of this unit is to:

  • explain the nature and value of the governing body's monitoring role as part of school improvement;

  • familiarise governors with different forms of monitoring and demonstrate ways in which governors can undertake their role as critical friends of the school;

  • reflect upon the importance of sharing information between members of the governing body and school staff;

  • raise awareness of the importance of the evalu
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Learning outcomes

This unit will help you to:

  • understand ways in which the governing body can be more involved in the planning processes of the school;

  • become familiar with available school performance data;

  • develop your understanding of how performance data can be used to decide future priorities for school improvement;

  • become familiar with the process of agreeing SMART targets.


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4.2 Pedagogy and reasonable adjustments

It has always been part of the OUs mission to make higher education available to all potential students, regardless of background or circumstance. To quote the OU mission statement: ‘It promotes educational opportunity and social justice by providing high-quality university education to all who wish to realise their ambitions and fulfil their potential.’

The DDA Part 4 makes it clear that education providers are responsible for:

  • anticipating
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3.10.2 Other impairments

There are people with a wide range of other impairments that are not covered by the above groups, but which may affect study. Some examples are listed below.

  • People with diabetes may have reduced sensitivity in their hands.

  • People with many different conditions may experience severe pain, which makes it difficult for them to concentrate on a task.

  • People with mental illness may have a range of difficulties, including
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1.2.1 Ethics

The first factor is ethics. Disabled people should not be excluded from using any product, device or service if it is at all possible to avoid this: disabled people have the same rights as non-disabled people to access goods and services. Teachers generally try to write material that reflects the experiences of women, as well as men and those of people from diverse backgrounds, to make a course inclusive and ‘pedagogically accessible’. This good practice should be extended to include refl
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Introduction

In this unit, aimed at teachers of Physical Education, we begin by looking at some of the common misconceptions relating to fitness and activity levels together with accepted definitions of these concepts. We consider how active young people should actually be, and discuss how PE teachers can ensure they are making an effective contribution to this area of public health.


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References

Bush T. and Middlewood D. (1997) Managing People in Education, Paul Chapman, London, p. 172.
The Education (School Teacher Appraisal) (England) Regulations 2000
DfES/Ofsted 2005, A New Relationship with Schools: Next Steps.

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3 What does the data tell us?

Data never gives you the answers: it helps you to ask the questions.

(Hawker, 1998)

Realistically, what governors can glean from attainment data, without assistance from the professionals, either in school or through the Local Authority (LA), may be limited, depending on your experience of reading statistical information.

A single set of figures, relating to only one year's results, may n
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Learning outcomes

The learning outcomes for this unit are to:

  • engage in a number of activities that involve visualisation and learn from your own experiences what it means;

  • learn the views of a well-known mathematics educator talking about visualisation and find out how your views compare with those of some other secondary-school mathematics teachers;

  • learn some ways that visualising could be incorporated into your classroom and consider a number of resources that mi
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6.2 Citizenship at work

Employment is an issue of growing relevance to the lives of young people. In addition to their contact with the world of work through work experience, work-related learning and Citizenship, many young people also combine part-time work with their studies…. Young people need to know about the importance of health and safety at work, how to tackle discrimination and how to exercise their rights. They also need to underst
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2. Does art have a value?

Art has been described as an open concept: a cumulative and developing category of objects and processes, which by its nature is not easily definable. Therefore it might be more relevant to consider how art based activities enhance human aptitudes, abilities and skills.

Some of the skills and values gained from the study of art and art history are listed below. For present purposes these can be subdivided into those that are intrinsic (undertaken for their own sake) and those tha
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2.1 Sharing practice

Section 2 provides an overview of the key mentoring strategies and issues linked to the OU flexible PGCE.

Learning to interpret classrooms from the teacher's perspective, and understanding the actions that lie behind what teachers do is the first – and most difficult – task that student teachers have to undertake. The teaching of an experienced teacher is often so fluent that it looks easy, and important decisions and processing of information about the pupils is hidd
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1.1.6 Keeping up-to-date

How familiar are you with the following different ways of keeping up to date with information; alerts, mailing lists, newsgroups, blogs, RSS, professional bodies and societies?

  • 5 – Very familiar

  • 4 – Familiar

  • 3 – Fairly familiar

  • 2 – Not very familiar

  • 1 – Not familiar at all


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2.2 Civil and criminal law

One of the most common classifications and one that is used by many legal systems, is the distinction between civil and criminal law. As civil and criminal law have different purposes, different systems for dealing with them have developed.

Criminal law is about creating laws for the protection of society as a whole and providing punishment for those who break those laws. Criminal law sets out types of behaviour that are forbidden within society and if the behaviour occurs, then punishm
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5.4 A brief history of scientific revolutions

We now go on to look at the history and traditions of scientific discovery. As an early years practitioner, you will find this survey useful in helping you to challenge the prevailing perception of science as ‘absolute truth’.

What we call science was once regarded as ‘magic’, ‘alchemy’ or ‘conjuring’. Such knowledge was viewed as ‘black magic’ and feared as a satanic art (Woolley, 2002). In part this may have been because, in the Middle Ages, scientific ideas were e
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Summary

In this section, you have begun to explore your knowledge about what language is and how you use it in your everyday life. In particular, you have seen that:

  • language (including literacy) is an inescapable part of everyday life;

  • language is a highly developed and specifically human system for making meaning;

  • using language involves coordinating a wide and complex range of knowledge of:

     

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2.3 ‘English’ as a school subject

In official UK curricula, language appears as a curriculum subject under a range of labels. In all four UK countries – England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales – the curricula for the 3–5 years age range (ACCAC, 2000a; DENI, 1997; QCA/DfEE, 2000; SCCC, 1999) include the word ‘language’ in the subject title. In the formal school curriculum, the subject is known as ‘English’ or ‘English Language’ (ACCAC, 2000b; CCEA, 2004; DfEE/QCA, 1999a; SOED, 1991). Wales, Northern Ire
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1.1.2 Reporting speech

When reporting what people have said you need to pay attention to:

  • reporting verb, e.g. say, tell, suggest;

  • verb tense, e.g. says, said, tells, told, suggest, suggested;

  • pronouns, e.g. I, she, he, it, they;

  • words of time and place, e.g. today, tomorrow, here, there.

Notice the changes in the example below.


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