Web of Science - Tracking a Good Article
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1.4 Coal-forming environments in the geological record

Figure 5 simplifies a typical vertical succession of sedimentary rocks found in many coalfields. The sequence from the base of the section upwards reveals the following:

  1. When a mire starts to form, the first plants take root in underlying clays or sands that form the soil. Their r
    Author(s): The Open University

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Energy resources: Solar energy
Energy from sources other than fossil and nuclear fuels is to a large extent free of the concerns about environmental effects and renewability that characterize those two sources. Each alternative source supplies energy continuall, whether or not we use it, and most have their origins in energy generated outside the Earth, yet the potential of each is limited by its total supply set against its rate of use. The Sun will radiate energy until it ceases thermonuclear fusion, in around 5 billion yea
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Introduction

This course introduces you to the types of activities undertaken by students of the earth sciences and ecology. You will learn how data is collected and analysed.

This OpenLearn course provides a sample of Level 1 study in Science.


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1.3 Nucleic acids and the flow of genetic information
This unit helps you understand the properties of nucleotides and how they contribute to secondary and tertiary structures of nucleic acids at the molecular level. You will learn about the different composition and roles of nucleic acids in the cell, their interactions with each other and the use of ribozymes, aptamers, antisense and hybridization as tools in molecular research. The unit covers the function of DNA packaging within the cell, the interactions between the DNA double helix and the nu
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1.2 Nucleic acids: genetic, functional and structural roles in the cell
This unit helps you understand the properties of nucleotides and how they contribute to secondary and tertiary structures of nucleic acids at the molecular level. You will learn about the different composition and roles of nucleic acids in the cell, their interactions with each other and the use of ribozymes, aptamers, antisense and hybridization as tools in molecular research. The unit covers the function of DNA packaging within the cell, the interactions between the DNA double helix and the nu
Author(s): The Open University

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3 Chromosome structure and DNA replication
Genomes are composed of DNA, and a knowledge of the structure of DNA is essential to understand how it can function as hereditary material. DNA is remarkable, breathtakingly simple in its structure yet capable of directing all the living processes in a cell, the production of new cells and the development of a fertilized egg to an individual adult. DNA has three key properties: it is relatively stable; its structure suggests an obvious way in which the molecule can be duplicated, or replicated;
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1 1.2 How DNA is replicated
Genomes are composed of DNA, and a knowledge of the structure of DNA is essential to understand how it can function as hereditary material. DNA is remarkable, breathtakingly simple in its structure yet capable of directing all the living processes in a cell, the production of new cells and the development of a fertilized egg to an individual adult. DNA has three key properties: it is relatively stable; its structure suggests an obvious way in which the molecule can be duplicated, or replicated;
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1.1.1 The chemical structure of DNA
Genomes are composed of DNA, and a knowledge of the structure of DNA is essential to understand how it can function as hereditary material. DNA is remarkable, breathtakingly simple in its structure yet capable of directing all the living processes in a cell, the production of new cells and the development of a fertilized egg to an individual adult. DNA has three key properties: it is relatively stable; its structure suggests an obvious way in which the molecule can be duplicated, or replicated;
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Learning outcomes
Genomes are composed of DNA, and a knowledge of the structure of DNA is essential to understand how it can function as hereditary material. DNA is remarkable, breathtakingly simple in its structure yet capable of directing all the living processes in a cell, the production of new cells and the development of a fertilized egg to an individual adult. DNA has three key properties: it is relatively stable; its structure suggests an obvious way in which the molecule can be duplicated, or replicated;
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3. Farewell Information, Welcome Media (February 4, 2009)
Technology, computers, economics, business, internet, Google, participation, mobile technology, cell phones, cameras, blogs, consumers, Hulu, television, email, Kindle, failure, Second Life, Apple, Microsoft, consumer electronics, iphone, sensors, robot,
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Episode 4: Stem Cell Research

Professor Loane Skene and Professor Peter Rathjen discuss the debate on stem cell research with Jacky Angus

Guests:
Professor Loane Skene, President of the Academic Board of the University of Melbourne, a member of the Council of the University, and Pro Vice-Chancellor of the University.
Professor Pe
Author(s): up-close@unimelb.edu.au (University of Melbourne)

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Video: Name Writing and Kindergarten Readiness
Learn tips on how to improve your child's name writing to prepare him or her for kindergarten in this free how-to video clip. (01:08)

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Cell Fractionation in Tetrahymena
To illustrate cell fractionation, nuclei are isolated from the ciliated protozoan, Tetrahymena thermophila. A table top clinical centrifuge is used for the fractionation steps and the procedure is monitored microscopically using a differential stain. To determine the efficiency of the procedure, cell and nuclear counts are determined with a hemacytometer. To quantify DNA, the Diphenylamine Reaction is carried out and the amount of DNA per nucleus is calculated.
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Babbage: War of the words
We explore a clutch of new words from 2016 and how technology contributes to the evolution of language. Vishal Sikka, the CEO of a technology services company explains how artificial intelligence can enhance the labour force. Also, science correspondent Matt Kaplan on a new device to sniff out disease
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Bacterial Quorum Sensing and Bioluminescence
The bacterium Vibrio fischeri produces light when it is growing symbiotically in the light organ of certain fish and squid species. The bacteria sense they are in a light organ because they are present at a high bacterial cell density, which they detect through "quorum sensing." We use several bacterial strains, each of which carry only part of the genes responsible for the quorum sensing and bioluminescence process. We use chemical and genetic complementation to determine which genes are lackin
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Solar Cells
Advanced semiconductor devices are a new source of energy for the 21st century, delivering electricity directly from sunlight. Suitable semiconductor materials, device physics, and fabrication technologies for solar cells are presented in this course. The guidelines for design of a complete solar cell system for household application are explained. Cost aspects, market development, and the application areas of solar cells are presented.
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Stem Cells: 5 Year Progress Report
Embryonic stem cells can transform themselves into every cell in your body. Does researching these stem cells violate human sanctity, or is it medicine's brightest frontier? What are the prospects for adult stem cells?
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Medicines by Design
Medicines By Design aims to explain how scientists unravel the many different ways medicines work in the body and how this information guides the hunt for drugs of the future. Pharmacology is a broad discipline encompassing every aspect of the study of drugs, including their discovery and development and the testing of their action in the body. Much of the most promising pharmacological research going on at universities across the country is sponsored by the National Institute of General Medical
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Essential Science for Teachers: Physical Science: Session 2. The Particle Nature of Matter: Solids,
In-depth interviews with children that uncover their ideas about the topic at hand.,The segment provides examples of questions used to probe the student's ideas about particles, particularly, that substances such as air are made up of invisible tiny particles called atoms that are far too small to be seen through a regular microscope. When asked if he could draw air, the student responds that air cannot be drawn because it is just a bunch of invisible particles called atoms, but when probed furt
Author(s): Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics

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