2.3 IT and you

Sometimes it's useful to stop and think a bit about your own experiences and focus on your own views. This can help you understand issues in more depth. For example, when studying the impact of IT on everyday life, your own experiences are a useful resource.

Activity 4

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5 ‘Indian’ on the outside

In 1801 and 1805, first Holland and then his assistant William Porden (1775–1822) had been commissioned to make sketches for altering the exterior to a Chinese style so as to match the extravagantly Chinese interiors, but these projects remained unfulfilled ( Plate 14 ). Drawing on the pictorial records brought back by William Alexander f
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Writing Responses to Open-Ended Questions
This is a presentation of 16 slides that addresses how to answer open-response questions. View at your own pace.
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#380: Recovery from stroke: Harnessing the brain's capacity to overcome disability

Stroke rehabilitation researcher Prof. Julie Bernhardt discusses the state of the science in stroke recovery. Taking an interdisciplinary approach, Prof Bernhardt and her team develop and test new exercises and rehabilitation measures that aim not only to reduce disability but promote recovery. This includes renewed attention to precise timing
Author(s): up-close@unimelb.edu.au (University of Melbourne)

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2.2.2 Energy and conservation

Newtonian mechanics is concerned with explaining motion, yet it contains within it the much simpler idea that some things never change. Take the concept of mass, for example, which appears throughout Newtonian mechanics, including the law of gravitation. In Newtonian mechanics, mass is conserved. This means that the mass of the Universe is constant and the mass of any specified collection of particles is constant, no matter how much rearrangement occurs within the system. A chemist might take
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3.6 Different paradigms and different methods

These different methods alert us to the fact that psychology is not just one enterprise, but a series of interlocking enterprises in which psychologists have different views about the best ways to try to understand or explain people and their behaviour and experience. These are arguments about epistemology; that is, what questions to ask, what sort of evidence to look for, what sort of criteria to use to evaluate explanations, and what sort of methods to use.

All knowledge and al
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3.3 Underground mining

Underground mining operations have four significant environmental impacts — spoil heaps, methane build-up, subsidence and water pollution. Spoil heaps have always been the principal surface feature of underground mining operations. However, legislation and technical advances have brought improvements in modern mines, and the closure of many of the UK's older mines has often been followed by successful rehabilitation of mine sites and spoil heaps by landscaping and tree planting.

Coal
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5.2.1 Discrete variables

The charts about different modes of transport and that on attendance figures at a range of cultural events all use what might be called ‘word categories’. Each category (e.g. bus, rail, cycle, and walk) is quite distinct from any other in the set of categories. Such distinct categories are known in mathematics as ‘discrete variables’.

Word categories are not the only type of variable that is discrete; numbers can also be discrete. For example, at the beginning of this section, w
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3.1 Lifestyle choices

Health is generally considered to be the absence of disease. However, the absence of any symptoms of disease may cause us to mistakenly believe we are healthy. We can't see inside our arteries to know how blocked up they are with fatty deposits without specialised equipment, but that doesn't mean it isn't gradually happening.

You may consider that your heart is healthy. What are your chances, as a member of the general population, of developing cardiovascular diseases now, next year or
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Open celled aluminium foam produced by infiltration of sintered salt
This is an inexpensive route for the production of open celled foams. It allows a high degree of control over cell size and shape, and results in relatively uniform morphology. The interconnectivity of pores can be controlled by varying the degree of sintering of the precursor.
Author(s): DoITPoMS, University of Cambridge,J A Curran, Depa

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1.5.2 What is the significance of the numbers?

In seeking the significance of these numbers, there is more information on the tablet that we have not yet taken into account, namely the text of the column headings themselves. The heading of column A is partly destroyed, but the text headings for B and C are clearer. B says something like ‘ib-sa of the front’, and C ‘ib-sa of the diagonal’, where ib-sa is a Sumerian word whose significance here is not precisely known. The geometrical
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Stem Cell Therapies are no More Drugs Than Soufflés are Fast Food
Stemcell discoveries make great news stories, but their actual translation into routine clinical practice is still a major hurdle. Is it reasonable to expect the big pharmaceutical companies to manufacture these living therapies or is the paradigm shift from today’s drugs to ‘living cells as therapies’ overwhelming? Would McDonald’s ever put delicate soufflés on their fast-food menus? This lecture will use examples from current cell and tissue-engineered clinical therapies to illustrate
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5.6 The importance of size and habitat

The use of hibernation to gain energetic advantage must be weighed against a number of considerations, particularly animal size and behaviour, biogeographic distribution and habitat. Small animals, which can carry less fat and have a higher surface area to volume ratio and BMR, are more likely to lose energy as heat and in maintaining life functions if they do not use hypothermic strategies in winter. Few hibernating mammals have a total body mass greater than 5 kg. Indeed, in large animals t
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RVC 27 - Pathogen Evasion of The Immune System and Animal Disease
In the latest RVC podcast, Professor Dirk Werling describes the importance of the Innate Immune System in combating infection by micro-organisms and the tactics that some of these bugs use to evade these defences, with particular reference to his work on immune cell receptors in cattle.
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Management in Chinese cultures
What can we learn from the way business is done in Asian cultures? The dominant management philosophy in the Asia-Pacific region is a Chinese one, emphasising Confucian values, the family and respect for authority. Does the enduring success of this approach have important lessons for us in the West, or is this management style increasingly redundant, as economies and companies internationalise and mature? This album visits several companies in Asia to explore the relationship between value syste
Author(s): The iTunes U team

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7.340 Avoiding Genomic Instability: DNA Replication, the Cell Cycle, and Cancer (MIT)
In this class we will learn about how the process of DNA replication is regulated throughout the cell cycle and what happens when DNA replication goes awry. How does the cell know when and where to begin replicating its DNA? How does a cell prevent its DNA from being replicated more than once? How does damaged DNA cause the cell to arrest DNA replication until that damage has been repaired? And how is the duplication of the genome coordinated with other essential processes? We will examine both
Author(s): Randell, John,Tanny, Robyn

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5.3 Purposeful and purposive behaviour

It is possible, as observers, to ascribe a purpose to what we or others do, the actions we take. How particular actions, or activities are construed will differ from observer to observer because of their different perspectives, which arise from their traditions of understanding. For example, in Author(s): The Open University

9.913-A Intensive Neuroanatomy (MIT)
The course will start with an overview of the central and peripheral nervous systems (CNS and PNS), the development of their structure and major divisions. The major functional components of the CNS will then be reviewed individually. Topography, functional distribution of nerve cell bodies, ascending and descending tracts in the spinal cord. Brainstem organization and functional components, including cranial nerve nuclei, ascending / descending pathways, amine-containing cells, structure and in
Author(s): Nedivi, Elly

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20.462J Molecular Principles of Biomaterials (MIT)
This course covers the analysis and design at a molecular scale of materials used in contact with biological systems, including biotechnology and biomedical engineering. Topics include molecular interactions between bio- and synthetic molecules and surfaces; design, synthesis, and processing approaches for materials that control cell functions; and application of state-of-the-art materials science to problems in tissue engineering, drug delivery, vaccines, and cell-guiding surfaces.
Author(s): Irvine, Darrell

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22.55J Principles of Radiation Interactions (MIT)
The central theme of this course is the interaction of radiation with biological material. The course is intended to provide a broad understanding of how different types of radiation deposit energy, including the creation and behavior of secondary radiations; of how radiation affects cells and why the different types of radiation have very different biological effects. Topics will include: the effects of radiation on biological systems including DNA damage; in vitro cell survival models; and in
Author(s): Coderre, Jeffrey

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