Cell Division in Animals
This is a brief computer-animated video that describes differentiation in animals at the cellular level (cell division).  Once the cells are differentiated they lose the ability to divide. As a result, one cannot grow a whole animal in a culture medium from a single cell. The growth of the whole animal in a single cell is only possible in the early stages of development - after the first one or two divisions. Other key words include: ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm.  Run time 01:51.
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Cell and Tissue Dysfunction, Cancer and Experimental Strategies to Develop Anti-cancer Therapeutics
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The Cell Cycle, Mitosis and Meiosis
UKOER Instructional sheet
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Cell structure and organization -#2
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Cell Membrane: Just Passing Through
This interactive feature describes some of the most important structures and functions of the cell membrane.
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Cell Differentiation

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Cell Differentiation
In this video segment from The Secret of Life school video, "Sex and the Single Gene" follow as a single fertilized egg cell divides, differentiates, and assembles into the tissues and organs of a new organism.
Author(s): WGBH Educational Foundation

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Alporas' closed cell aluminium foam
Additions are made to molten aluminium or aluminium alloy to modify the melt viscosity and make it suitable for foaming. 1 to 3 wt% titanium hydride is then added to the melt, and this foams the melt by releasing hydrogen. The foamed melt solidifies to yield a closed cellular structure with an average cell size of 4.5 mm
Author(s): DoITPoMS, University of Cambridge,Dr V Gergely, De

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FOAMCARP closed cell aluminium foam
Additions such as SiC are made to molten aluminium or aluminium alloy to modify the melt viscosity and make it suitable for foaming. Calcium carbonate is then added to the melt which is solidified to form a precursor which can be foamed in a controlled manner by a subsequent heat treatment. The resulting foam has a fine and relatively uniform cell structure.
Author(s): DoITPoMS, University of Cambridge,D C Curran, Depa

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FORMGRIP closed cell aluminium foam
Additions such as SiC are made to molten aluminium or aluminium alloy to modify the melt viscosity and make it suitable for foaming. 1 to 3 wt% of pre-oxidised titanium hydride is then added to the melt which is solidified to form a precursor which can be foamed in a controlled manner by a subsequent heat treatment. The resulting foam has a relatively fine and uniform cell structure.
Author(s): DoITPoMS, University of Cambridge,Dr V Gergely, De

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Low magnification SEM image of open cell polyurethane foam
If a gas is injected into a liquid it forms a cellular foam structure. When a thermoset prepolymer of low viscosity is foamed, the polymer can drain from the cell walls (driven by surface tension) before it sets at the cell edges, leaving an open-celled foam. The cell edges have three concave sides, giving rise to the tri-cuspid cross section visible at the bottom of this image. The average co-ordination number for the nodes (where struts meet) is four, giving tetrahedral junctions.
Author(s): DoITPoMS, University of Cambridge,Dr J A Elliott,

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X-ray tomography image of open cell polyurethane foam
If a gas is injected into a liquid it forms a cellular foam structure. When a thermoset prepolymer of low viscosity is foamed, the polymer can drain from the cell walls (driven by surface tension) before it sets at the cell edges, leaving an open-celled foam. The cell edges have three concave sides. The average co-ordination number for the nodes (where struts meet) is four, giving tetrahedral junctions. The deformation behaviour of the foam was observed by X-ray microtomography at the ESRF i
Author(s): DoITPoMS, University of Cambridge,Dr J A Elliott,

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High magnification SEM image of open cell polyurethane foam
If a gas is injected into a liquid it forms a cellular foam structure. When a thermoset prepolymer of low viscosity is foamed, the polymer can drain from the cell walls (driven by surface tension) before it sets at the cell edges, leaving an open-celled foam. The cell edges have three concave sides, and some remnants of collapsed cell walls can be seen at the cell edges.
Author(s): DoITPoMS, University of Cambridge,J A Curran, Depa

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SEM image of open cell polyurethane foam
If a gas is injected into a liquid it forms a cellular foam structure. When a thermoset prepolymer of low viscosity is foamed, the polymer can drain from the cell walls (driven by surface tension) before it sets at the cell edges, leaving an open-celled foam. The cell edges have three concave sides, giving rise to the tri-cuspid cross section visible at the bottom of this image. The average co-ordination number for the nodes (where struts meet) is four, giving tetrahedral junctions.
Author(s): DoITPoMS, University of Cambridge,J A Curran, Depa

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Model of the monoclinic ZrO2 unit cell
Rotating model of the monoclinic ZrO2 unit cell.
Author(s): DoITPoMS, University of Cambridge

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Cell signalling
This unit explains the general principles of signal transduction and specifically, how even the simplest organisms can detect and respond to events in their ever-changing environment.
Author(s): The Open University

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3.7 Hair cell tuning
Hearing is a familiar and important human sense that is a topic naturally of interest to those who are curious about human biology. This unit will enable you to relate what you read to your own sensory experiences – and indeed many of the questions asked have exactly that function. This unit will be best understood by those with some biological understanding.
Author(s): The Open University

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1.2 Nucleic acids: genetic, functional and structural roles in the cell
This unit helps you understand the properties of nucleotides and how they contribute to secondary and tertiary structures of nucleic acids at the molecular level. You will learn about the different composition and roles of nucleic acids in the cell, their interactions with each other and the use of ribozymes, aptamers, antisense and hybridization as tools in molecular research. The unit covers the function of DNA packaging within the cell, the interactions between the DNA double helix and the nu
Author(s): The Open University

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5 Where does transcription occur in the cell?
This unit explores how information contained in DNA is used, explaining the flow of information from DNA to RNA to protein. Also introduced are the concepts of transcription (as occurs between DNA and RNA) and translation.
Author(s): The Open University

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Cell Biology Improvement Drive
Wikiversity participants with an interest in Cell biology can participate in the "Cell biology improvement drive". This Learning Project is a service-oriented Wikiversity project devoted to improvement of Cell biology articles at Wikipedia and development of the Wikibooks textbook about Cell biology. Participants in the project can become involved in the construction of new Wikiversity pages that are concerned with Cell biology. This "Cell biology improvement drive" also includes improvement of
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