Learning outcomes

The unit introduces you to:

  • ways in which data may be stored and processed;

  • language notation and concepts that enable discussion of these in a precise way.

  • It enables you to do the following:

  • distinguish between different forms of data, and use notations introduced in the unit to show different forms of data;

  • appreciate that fine details may be important when interpreting formal notation (for example,
    Author(s): The Open University

    License information
    Related content

    Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

17.1 Introduction

I'm going to pause here to try to put together some of the ideas we have encountered so far. I deliberately chose the example of a supermarket to illustrate some of the key processes involved in an ICT system. Figure 15 is a modified version of the block diagram for computers in a ne
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

3.1 Searching for your ancestors

In this section we consider searching for information about your ancestors. We cannot hope to cover all the techniques and information required to research genealogy, family history and local history; there is only time in this unit to scratch the surface. Some of the activities here are open-ended; please do not spend too long on them. If the subject interests you, you can revisit it after the course finishes, making use of the genealogical resources in the Appendix.


Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

Unit summary

In this unit, the emphasis has been on devices communicating with each other in networks. You were introduced to some general principles about signals and networks, and the differences between wired and wireless networks. You met some of the network technologies in common use (Ethernet, WiFi and Bluetooth), before looking more closely at specific applications (smart homes, RFID systems) for networked devices. But we have barely had time to scratch the surface of what these technologies offer
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

4.9 Bluetooth

The driving force for the development of the Bluetooth standard was to eliminate the need for connecting wires between local ICT devices such as keyboards, monitors, printers, PDAs (Personal Digital Assistants), cell phones and headsets. This was already possible using infrared technology, but the requirement for line-of-sight positioning between the communicating interfaces limits infrared's usefulness. Because Bluetooth uses radio waves, Bluetooth devices can communicate with each other wit
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

References

Pearson, I. (2004) The Future of Everyday Life in 2010, British Telecommunications plc. [online] www.bt.com/sphere/insights/pearson/everyday.htm, accessed 6 September 2006.
Pragnell, M., Spence, L, and Moore R. (November, 2000) The Market Potential for Smart Homes, N40, Joseph Rowntree Foundation [online], York Publishing Services www.jrf.org.uk/knowledge/findings/housing/n40.asp, accessed 6 Septem
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

6.2 Objects

To represent a thing such as an account or a payment from an object perspective, the software developers need to say how it can be used. An account is something that can be credited or debited with amounts of money and that remembers the total balance between operations. As users of an account, we do not care whether the balance is represented by electrons or by numbers on a slate, or whether the numbers are represented in binary or decimal. As long as we can withdraw money at some time after
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

5.2 An example

In order to complete this section I shall present a simple example. This is loosely based on one described in [1], currently one of the very few books written on JavaSpaces technology.

An object that can be stored in a space has to implement an interface . The objects that form part of the example will just
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

5.3 The speed of development

E-commerce consultants speak of a web year. This is the time which it takes to bring to implementation a conventional system that would normally take a calendar year to develop. Current estimates are that one calendar year is equivalent to seven web years. Nowhere is there more of an imperative for companies to develop products and services quickly, together with the computing infrastructure required to support them, than in e-commerce. In software engineering terms this has given rise to a n
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

Making Mergers Less of a Crapshoot
Very human factors are at play in mergers and acquisitions. Paying attention to them can increase your chance of success.
Author(s): Manfred Kets de Vries, INSEAD Distinguished Clinic

License information
Related content

Rights not set

3.8 Summary

  • Because the subject matter of psychology (ourselves and non-human animals) is complex and reactive, psychologists have to choose from amongst a wide range of methods.

  • Psychologists make use of methods that aim to maximise objectivity; they also use methods that focus on and explore subjectivities and meanings.

  • Depending on the topic they are researching, psychologists can choose to adopt an outsider viewpoint or an insider
    Author(s): The Open University

    License information
    Related content

    Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

2.3.4 Symbolic data

The fourth kind of data is essentially symbolic – symbolic creations of minds, such as the texts people have written, their art, what they have said (recorded and transcribed), the exact ways they use language and the meanings they have communicated. These symbolic data are the products of minds, but once created they can exist and be studied and analysed quite separately from the particular minds that created them. These kinds of data are used to provide evidence of meanings, and th
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

3 Summary

This unit argued that managers should seek out and listen to service users' views, and considered some of the problems in doing this as well as models that are effective. It is not always straightforward or easy to engage service users in consultation but, like Jane Reast, the practice-led manager will think it is important to hear directly from service users, rather than always having knowledge and information mediated through the accounts of frontline workers.


Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

2.6 Component 4: the social work process

The social work process comprises a sequence of actions or tasks which draw upon all of the components of practice discussed so far. The social work process rarely follows a clear linear route and is more often a fluid circular process whereby workers may move from assessment through to implementation and evaluation and back to assessment again. Despite this fluidity, some parts of the process, such as assessment, have clearly defined procedures guided by local or national policy. Some tasks
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

Resource #10041
UNSPECIFIED - UNSPECIFIED Keywords:UNSPECIFIED
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

The Hubble Deep Field: The Most Important Image Ever Taken

A humbling series of images from the Hubble Space Telescope which show our place in the universe.

read more


Author(s): EduTube

License information
Related content

Rights not set

From Plants to Parasites
UGA researchers have discovered that a small component of some tropical parasites actually evolved from ancient algae and destroying this component of the parasite renders it incapable of reproduction. This may one day lead to advanced new therapies to fight debilitating tropical diseases.
Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

4.1 Natural stores of carbon

The major natural stores of carbon (called ‘reservoirs’) are shown below in Figure 1.9.

7.5 Outstanding issues

  • Evidence from rotation studies shows that some AGNs do indeed contain compact, supermassive objects within them, though there is no direct evidence that these are black holes.

  • Quasars were most abundant at redshifts of 2–3 and have been declining in number for the last 10 billion years.

  • It seems probable that AGNs fade with time as the supply of accreting material is used up. There is speculation that AGNs may be rejuvenat
    Author(s): The Open University

    License information
    Related content

    Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

9 Sedimentation at the end of the Caledonian Orgeny; Section 10 Legacy

The document attached below includes the ninth and tenth sections of Mountain building in Scotland, as well as the index. In these sections, you will find the following subsections:

  • 9.1 Introduction

  • 9.2 The Old Red Sandstone and the Devonian Period

  • 9.3 Distribution and stratigraphy of the Late Silurian to Devonian Basins

  • 9.4 Sedimentation and tectonics in the Midland Valley

      Author(s): The Open University

      License information
      Related content

      Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share