3 Summary

This unit argued that managers should seek out and listen to service users' views, and considered some of the problems in doing this as well as models that are effective. It is not always straightforward or easy to engage service users in consultation but, like Jane Reast, the practice-led manager will think it is important to hear directly from service users, rather than always having knowledge and information mediated through the accounts of frontline workers.


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2.6 Component 4: the social work process

The social work process comprises a sequence of actions or tasks which draw upon all of the components of practice discussed so far. The social work process rarely follows a clear linear route and is more often a fluid circular process whereby workers may move from assessment through to implementation and evaluation and back to assessment again. Despite this fluidity, some parts of the process, such as assessment, have clearly defined procedures guided by local or national policy. Some tasks
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The Hubble Deep Field: The Most Important Image Ever Taken

A humbling series of images from the Hubble Space Telescope which show our place in the universe.

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From Plants to Parasites
UGA researchers have discovered that a small component of some tropical parasites actually evolved from ancient algae and destroying this component of the parasite renders it incapable of reproduction. This may one day lead to advanced new therapies to fight debilitating tropical diseases.
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4.1 Natural stores of carbon

The major natural stores of carbon (called ‘reservoirs’) are shown below in Figure 1.9.

7.5 Outstanding issues

  • Evidence from rotation studies shows that some AGNs do indeed contain compact, supermassive objects within them, though there is no direct evidence that these are black holes.

  • Quasars were most abundant at redshifts of 2–3 and have been declining in number for the last 10 billion years.

  • It seems probable that AGNs fade with time as the supply of accreting material is used up. There is speculation that AGNs may be rejuvenat
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9 Sedimentation at the end of the Caledonian Orgeny; Section 10 Legacy

The document attached below includes the ninth and tenth sections of Mountain building in Scotland, as well as the index. In these sections, you will find the following subsections:

  • 9.1 Introduction

  • 9.2 The Old Red Sandstone and the Devonian Period

  • 9.3 Distribution and stratigraphy of the Late Silurian to Devonian Basins

  • 9.4 Sedimentation and tectonics in the Midland Valley

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1.6.3 Mailing lists and newsgroups

Mailing or discussion lists are e-mail based discussion groups. When you send an e-mail to a mailing list address, it is sent automatically to all the other members of the list.

The majority of academic-related mailing lists in the UK are maintained by JISCMail  You will find details of joining these mailing lists on the JISCMail website. Mailing lists are useful for getting in touch w
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1.6.2 Alerts

Online bookshops and some of the major search engines offer ‘Alerts’ services. These work by allowing you to set up a profile once you have registered on their site, and when there are items meeting your criteria you receive an email. The good thing about alerts is that you don’t have to do anything once you have set up your profile. The downside, particularly with alerts services from the search engines, is that given the extent to which internet traffic is on the increase whether new
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1.5.2 Ways of organizing yourself

How do you organize yourself?

Activity

Make a note of how you organise your:

  • emails

  • internet bookmarks or favorites

  • computer files

  • your h
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4.1 What is delegated legislation?

In Parts A and B of this unit you have learnt about the role of Parliament in the law-making process. In addition to the power to make law itself, Parliament can delegate or pass on the power to make law to another person or body. Delegated legislation is law made by another person or body to whom Parliament has delegated or passed on the required authority. The required authority or power is usually given by Parliament in a ‘parent’ Act of Parliament known as an enabling Act
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3.3 Procedure by which Bills become law

In order to become an Act of Parliament a Bill will have to be passed by both the House of Commons and the House of Lords. A Bill may start in either the House of Commons or the House of Lords, with the exception of Finance Bills which always start in the House of Commons. A Finance Bill is introduced by the Government shortly after the Budget to bring the Government's tax proposals into law.

Before a Bill can become an Act of Parliament it must undergo a number of stages.


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2.1 History

The Council of Europe was set up in 1949. It is an intergovernmental organisation (based in Strasbourg, France) set up to protect human rights, promote cultural diversity and to combat social problems such as intolerance. Its creation was seen as a way of achieving a European approach to the protection of certain individual rights. Although presented now as historical events, the horrors of what had taken place in the Second World War were then fresh in the minds of the governments and
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1 Unit overview

Apart from the English Parliament and common law, there are other major sources of legal rule-making that impact on English domestic law. These are the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) and European Union (EU) law.

In comparison with parliamentary legislation and common law, these sources are a recent development. In fact, both the ECHR and EU are just over 50 years old, having emerged as sources of legal rule making in the mid-twentieth century. This makes them relatively dev
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Introduction

In this unit you will analyse the role of European institutions including the European Commission and the European Court of Justice in legal rule making in England and Wales. You will also be introduced to the study skills that you will need in reading legal cases, reading and understanding Acts of Parliament, using the internet to find legal materials, taking notes, creating study diagrams and summarising ideas.

This unit is an adapted extract from the course Author(s): The Open University

6.8 Extrinsic aids

Extrinsic aids are matters which may help put an Act into context. Sources include previous Acts of Parliament on the same topic, earlier case law, dictionaries of the time, and the historical setting. In addition, Hansard can now be considered. Hansard is the official report of what was said in Parliament when the Act was debated. The use of Hansard was permitted following the decision in Pepper (Inspector of Taxes) v Hart (1993) where the House of Lords accepted that Hansard could be
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6.4 The mischief rule

This third rule gives a judge more discretion than either the literal or the golden rule. This rule requires the court to look to what the law was before the statute was passed in order to discover what gap or mischief the statute was intended to cover. The court is then required to interpret the statute in such a way to ensure that the gap is covered. The rule is contained in Heydon's Case (1584), where it was said that for the true interpretation of a statute, four things have to be
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9.1 Making sense of complexity

This section is about finding ways of thinking about complex situations – making sense of complexity. This is a process of discovery. It involves thinking about complexity in an orderly way that allows you to enter a deeper understanding of the complexity. It goes beyond immersion in, and representation of, complexity.

The invitation I am making in this section is to move into the possibility of structuring complexity. Notice I am not suggesting there is structure in the
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Copyright © 2013 The Open University

Toastmasters Dinner Intro and Charity
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