9 Metre

As we have seen, scansion is the act of mapping out stress patterns in order to ascertain the metre (rhythm). In the accentual-syllabic system, the dominant tradition in English, both accents (stresses) and syllables are measured and counted. In accentual metre, the stresses are counted and the syllables can vary. In syllabic metre, the syllables are counted, while the stresses can vary.

Here is pentameter, the line of fi
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Ethique environnementale et développement durable (Vidéo)

Dans cette vidéo, Sylvie Ferrari discute de l'éthique de l'environnement dans une perspective de développement durable. Cette éthique, qui place au coeur de ses préoccupations les relations entre générations présentes et futures, est envisagée à travers deux conceptions : une durabilité faible et une durabilité forte.


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Fierce fighting for Sirte
Sept 18 - Libyan forces battled to loosen grip on Gaddafi hometown, Sirte. Marie-Claire Fennessy reports.
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3.1 Introduction

In this section we look at the way in which the personal lives of older people have been socially constructed through pensions policies over the last century. As we saw above, welfare policies and changes in employment in the latter part of the nineteenth century and early part of the twentieth century constructed the personal lives of older people as ‘other’ to the emergent normal of relatively younger, ‘independent’ paid workers. Here, we explore the way pensions policies during the
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2.3 Biography and psychobiography

A significant, inescapable identifying feature of the twentieth century was the birth and development of psychoanalysis. Combined with romantic notions of the artist-genius and the attractiveness of the artist's ‘Life’ as evidence for writing the history of Renaissance art, psychoanalysis further ensured the continued success of the monographic construction of art history. A good example of this overlap between the increasingly redundant/discredited ‘Life’ of an artist and the more re
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Activity 4

Methods of participation

0 hours 45 minutes

We have considered the values and skills needed to undertake participation work. We will now consider some of the methods that can be used to facilitate chi
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4.2.3 Restating the problem

If your analysis of the problem and its possible causes is thorough, it should enable you to rewrite the problem statement to include the causes. If you can clarify your objective by defining a desired end-state, you are more likely to produce a good solution.


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1.2 Extracellular signals can act locally or at a distance

First we shall consider the general types of intercellular signalling mechanism within multicellular organisms (Figure 3). Broadly speaking, cells may interact with each other directly, requiring cell–cell contact, or indirectly, via molecules secreted by one cell, which are then carried away to target cells.


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8.1 The octave sound

One feature of pitch that seems to be universal to all cultures is that for musical purposes the pitch range is divided into discrete steps: for instance, the notes of a scale. This is not to say that musicians rigidly adhere to those steps when they play, but the existence of such steps is fundamental to the way music is conceived and organised. Different cultures have different ways of defining the steps in their scale of pitches, but nearly all cultures take the octave as their starting po
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3.2 Number of progeny

Female guppies begin to breed as soon as they become mature at about three months old; they then produce clutches of eggs, most of which become fertilized, at roughly one-month intervals until they die or become too old. Clutches vary in size from one to 40 eggs; the average clutch contains about 10 eggs. Thus, female guppies produce a large number of offspring during their lives, far more than can survive to maturity.

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2.1 Using medical terminology: building a glossary

As you start studying a medical subject, it is useful to be familiar with the sort of terminology you will come across. Often there are similar-sounding terms with different meanings, e.g. hypo and hyper. There is medical jargon that needs deciphering, e.g. hypertension means high Author(s): The Open University

SMU Centennial Symposium: Welcoming Remarks
Welcoming remarks by James K. Hopkins, Symposium Chair and SMU Altshuler Distinguished Teaching Professor, and by SMU Provost Paul Ludden for "The University and the City: Higher Education and the Common Good." The relationship between cities and universities was the theme of SMU's Centennial Academic Symposium, held November 10-11, 2011.
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1.5 Rounding to decimal places

Sometimes the result of a calculation gives a number with lots of decimal places - far more than you need or could reliably measure. For instance, suppose a patient is required to receive 5 ml of medicine a day, evenly spaced in three injections. How much medicine should they be given in each dose?

To divide the 5 ml of medicine into three equal parts would mean measuring out 5 ÷ 3 = 1.6666 ml (where the 6s keep repeating, or recurring indefinitely). It's not realistic or feasib
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3.1.1 Update: A move towards patient-centred care?

David Lee of Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, commenting on recent changes towards patient-centred care, said ‘The modernisation agenda stemming from the National Health Service Plan (Department of Health, 2000) is requiring major shifts in organisational and cultural thinking. The patient is increasingly being placed first and at the centre of every aspect of health care. In essence, health care and indeed ward routines are now expected to be driven by the needs of patients and users of
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References

Connor, A. (1993) Monitoring and Evaluation Made Easy, HMSO.
Craig, S. and Jassim, H. (1995) People and Project Management for IT, McGraw-Hill.
Mae-Wan Ho (1999) ‘One bird – ten thousand treasures’, The Ecologist, October 1999, reprinted in Resurgence, No. 199, March/April 2000, p. 15.
Schlesinger, P.F
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Acknowledgements

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions), this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission to reproduce materia
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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • understand the key aspects of William Wilberforce’s political career and writings, and have an appreciation of their historical and religious significance

  • demonstrate an awareness of the relationship of Evangelicalism to cultural transitions between the Enlightenment and Romanticism

  • understand the contribution of religion to cultural, social and political change in Britain in the years after the F
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Optional reading

Debates about the relationship between science, citizenship and democracy continue to influence public policies related to science communication and public engagement in science. In part, these debates involve discussions about scientific and other ways of knowing. For an introduction to these issues, see Irwin (1999).

This premise, of exchanging information and learning from others, is also relevant to your communication with other expert scientists. As a research student you will lear
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4.3 Responses to religion

Reasoned responses to religion could take many forms. It was rare for writers to profess outright atheism; even in those cases where we may suspect authors of holding this view, censorship laws made their public expression unlawful. These laws were particularly stringent in France. In many cases reasoned critique was applied to the practices of institutional religion, such as the corruption of the clergy or the rituals of worship, rather than to more fundamental matters of doctrine or faith.
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3 Peter, Roger, Rachel, Jenny and Veera

Figure 2
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