Quiz

Welcome to the open educational resource (OER) quiz. By embarking on this course you are no doubt already considering that OER may benefit your own teaching and learning practices; the purpose of this quiz is to start you thinking about the wide range of themes, tools and resources available to those who wish to engage with OER. The quiz consists of a range of multiple choice and free text questions. The quiz should take between 30 and 45 minutes to complete.


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1.4.1 PROMPT

There is so much information available on the internet on every topic imaginable. But how do you know if it is any good? And if you find a lot more information than you really need, how do you decide what to keep and who to discard?

In this section we are going to introduce a simple checklist to help you to judge the quality of the information you find. Before we do this, spend a few minutes thinking about what is meant by information quality.

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1.2.1 Planning your search

Your approach to searching will depend to a great extent on what kind of person you are. In an ideal world, when searching for information for a specific purpose, we would all find what exactly we were looking for at the first attempt, especially if we are in a hurry. However, it's always a good idea to have some kind of plan when you are searching for information, if only to help you plan your time and make sure you find the information you need. If I was starting to search for material on h
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1.7 Key points

In the key points box below we sum up the main ideas introduced so far. You can use it now to check that you have grasped the main ideas, and later the key points will remind you of the content.

Key points

  • An informal carer is defined as a person who, without
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1.6 All together now? Discussion

Views – whether from citizens or consumers – are diverse, although there are similarities within and between groups: for instance, on the need for respect. Diversity of opinion as well as diversity of need must be addressed by frontline managers. A few of the individuals and groups noted by our testers include: users of services for mental health, physical disability, older people, children and families; carers; workers; union representatives; managers; the general public; local and natio
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1.5 Moving forward?

So far you have read about the development of consultation with service users. Why, then, do service users and their organisations experience a struggle to be heard? What barriers are they encountering?

Service providers may structure consultation around service needs rather than service users' interests. For example, consultation at the planning, delivery and monitoring stages of a new day centre might be informative to service providers as well as a good example of service user involv
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5 Comment on the audio clips

The benefits mentioned in the clips included a skills outlet, developing organising and networking skills, improvements to the members' self-esteem, and better social contact than before. There were also practical benefits in terms of getting help with household, gardening and computing problems. Any disadvantages were hard to identify. People were enthusiastic about their experiences. Through involving someone like Jan Hurst, the disadvantages of self-help with its tendency towards rather cl
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4 Audio activity

Now listen to the audio clips. As you listen, make notes in your Learning Journal on:

  • what you think are the benefits and disadvantages of LETS schemes for their members;

  • to what extent these schemes fit with a community development approach;

  • what might be some longer-term outcomes for the schemes and their members.


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3 Peter, Roger, Rachel, Jenny and Veera

Figure 2
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Introduction

Local Exchange and Trading Schemes (LETS) expanded rapidly in the UK after the first scheme was set up in Norfolk in 1985. By 1996 LETSLINK UK, the coordinating body, reckoned that there were about 450 LETS in the UK, with 40,000 members. LETS exist in most western European countries – in Australia and New Zealand, the US, Canada and Japan. Their origins lie in Canadian attempts to revive local traditions of skills exchange and barter outside commercial and international labour markets and
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Acknowledgements

The content acknowledged below is Proprietary (see terms and conditions) and is used under licence.

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission to reproduce material in this unit:

The content acknowledged below is Proprietary and is used und
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Learning outcomes

On completion of this unit, you should be able to:

  • understand how minority communities require different types of support from caring agencies.


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Acknowledgements

The material acknowledged below is Proprietary and used under licence (not subject to Creative Commons licence). See Terms and conditions.

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission to use material in this course:

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References

Airhihenbuwa, C.O. (1995) Health and Culture: Beyond the Western paradigm, London, Sage.
Antonovsky, A. (1984) ‘The sense of coherence as a determinant of health’, in Matarazzo, J.D. (ed.) Behavioural Health, New York, Wiley, pp. 114–29.
Antonovsky, A. (1987) Unravelling the Mystery of Health: How people manage stress and stay well, California, Josse
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6.1 Introduction

Although clearly related, the concepts of illness and disease are distinct. People have illness and physicians diagnose and treat disease. Disease is an objective term which implies a malfunctioning of the body or part of the body. Disease is pathological and is diagnosed on the basis of recognisable signs and symptoms. Illness is the subjective experience of pain, discomfort or disorder. Although it is mostly safe to say that illness is the subjective experience of disease, it is possible to
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1.1 Knowledge

What exactly is meant by knowledge and theory and how can it inform practice? This question is too wide-ranging be fully answered here, but the following section maps out the kinds of knowledge that are relevant to practice. We hope you recognise that you possess a lot of ‘knowledge’, whatever your personal or working background.

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1.3.10 Allied health resources

There are quality nursing, midwifery and allied health resources provided free of charge on the Internet. Each resource has been evaluated and categorised by subject specialists based at UK universities.


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1.3.9 Internet resources

There are many websites where you will find useful information on health and lifestyle. With all information on the internet you need to make a judgement on the reliability of the information.

BBC Health The health pages on the BBC website.
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1.3.8 Statistics

There is a lot of statistical data on the internet relating to health and lifestyle.

Department of Health Contains information about the aims and objectives of the Department, National Health Service (NHS) policy and guidance, the NHS Events diary, lists of DOH publications,
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1.2.2 How older pupils view school

For older children the work of school becomes less important in itself. Research that explored Scottish secondary school pupils' ideas about why they went to school revealed that for many pupils school served primarily as a social experience during the first two years and then later was seen as being instrumental in what would happen in their future lives:

‘You don't want to be one of these drunks and that you se
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