Where next for public health in the era of austerity?
This event was the second in a series of master class lectures jointly staged by the University of Leeds and Leeds Metropolitan University bringing together relevant senior figures and academics from across the city and surrounding region. The twenty-first century has seen a growth in political, environmental and economic insecurity in the context of global recession, population ageing and climate change. Responding to these threats involves rethinking how we work together, care for ourselves,
Author(s): Professor Paul Johnstone,Leeds Metropolitan Univer

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3.2 Dissolved oxygen

Organic and inorganic nutrients are the basic food supply essential for maintaining the plants and animals in natural watercourses. Equally essential to aquatic life is a supply of oxygen, needed for respiration. Oxygen dissolved in the water is also needed in the biodegradation of organic matter by aerobic (oxygen-consuming) bacteria. A measure of this oxygen demand can be obtained experimentally and is defined as the biochemical oxygen demand (BOD). The BOD i
Author(s): The Open University

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7.1 Questions

Question 1

What are the four dimensions of globalisation outlined in Section 4?

Question 2

Outline, in no more than 100 words, the distinctions between the three approaches to achieving sustainability outlined in this course.

Question 3

Organise the following under the headings ‘government’ and ‘governance’:

  • clearly defined state actors

  • linear model

  • multi-layer
    Author(s): The Open University

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2.2 Video activity

This activity asks you to watch the three video clips below.

As you are watching, try to identify any examples you see of consultation and involvement, and what Jane sees as the key factors in the way Redcar & Cleveland Mind has developed these processes. Make notes as you go.

1.2.2 Choosing keywords

Keywords are significant words which define the subject you are looking for. The importance of keywords is illustrated by the fact that there is a whole industry around providing advice to companies on how to select keywords for their websites that are likely to make it to the top of results lists generated by search engines. We often choose keywords as part of an iterative process; usually if we don't hit on the right search terms straight off, most of us tweak them as we go along based on t
Author(s): The Open University

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4.1 Introduction

The 1970s marked a period in which the cessation of the ‘normal’ period of full-time employment at 60 or 65 years had become the accepted orthodoxy. The personal lives of older people had thus become constituted outside the domain of paid employment and within the arena of public and private welfare. As we illustrated in the preceding section, pensions, organised around fixed ages of retirement based on chronological measurements of age, played a crucial role in this process. Further, as
Author(s): The Open University

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TALAT Lecture 1253: Creep
This lecture constitutes an introduction to creep and to the creep response of aluminium and its alloys. It provides basic information on creep and its mechanisms; it gives a description of the more extensively used mathematical relations among creep variables (time, stress and temperature); it illustrates the creep response of pure Aluminium and of Al-Mg alloys; it provides a synthesis of the information available in the literature on the creep behaviour of a number of new alloys and composites
Author(s): TALAT,S Spigarelli, University of Ancona

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Keep on learning

Study another free course

There are more than 800 courses on OpenLearn for you to choose from on a range of subjects. 

Find out more
Author(s): The Open University

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The History of the United Nations
A quick run through of the birth of the UN and some of the major events in its history. The narrator speaks quickly making it a little hard to follow.
Author(s): No creator set

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2.3.3 Landscape

You have heard this point discussed on the recording. ‘Kinloch Ainort’ is a rarity in MacLean's work – a poem ostensibly concerned with nothing but description of natural phenomena. Yet the erotic charge is unmistakeable. ‘Antlered bellowing’ is that of stags in rut. In ‘A Spring’, however, there is a conflict between love and landscape: the poet, obsessed with the image of his love in the water, is cut off from the glens and mountains which are indifferent to his obsession with
Author(s): The Open University

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Lesson 02 - One Minute Romanian
In lesson 2 of One Minute Romanian you will learn a few more useful words in Romanian which you'll use every day. Remember - even a few phrases of a language can help you make friends and enjoy travel more. Find out more about One Minute Romanian at our website - http://www.oneminutelanguages.com. One Minute Romanian is brought to you by the Radio Lingua Network and is ©Copyright 2008.Author(s): No creator set

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Foundations in evidence based practice
This is a module framework. It can be viewed online for downloaded as a zip file. As taught in Spring Semester 2010. This module is taught on the Diploma/BSc in Nursing and covers an introduction to evidence-based practice; the nature of evidence; an introduction to the research process; reflective thinking and writing; portfolio development skills; searching/accessing information/literature; summarising literature; referencing literature sources; reviewing literature; an introduction to law
Author(s): University of Nottingham. School of Nursing Midwif

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Rep. Weiner steps down amid Internet scandal
June 16 - U.S. Representative Anthony Weiner, embroiled in a sex scandal for sending lewd photos of himself to women over the Internet, announces his resignation. Rough Cut (no reporter narration).
Author(s): No creator set

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David Devins - 60 Second Research
Dr David Devins, Principle Research Fellow in the Policy Research Institute at Leeds Metropolitan University has only 60 seconds to describe his research interests.
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3.2 What are rights?

The modern discourse of universal human rights has a number of features. The idea that everyone, everywhere has rights refers to the concept that there are certain entitlements justifiably owed to all individuals by virtue of certain features that all human beings have in common. As the nineteenth-century French politician and historian Alexis de Tocqueville put it, the idea of rights ‘removes from any request its supplicant character, and places the one who claims it on the same level as t
Author(s): The Open University

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References

Argent, H. (1996) ‘Children in need: unaccompanied refugees’, in Adoption and Fostering, vol. 20, no. 1, pp. 24-9.
Banks, S. (2001) ‘Ethics and Values in Social Work’, 2nd edn, London, British Association of Social W
Author(s): The Open University

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5.2 Background to Theory of the Earth

The two volumes of Theory of the Earth embody a startlingly original conception of the processes which shape the earth's surface, and they contain some vivid observations, drawn from Hutton's travels. However, they are poorly organised, repetitive and sometimes obscure. In a most helpful survey of Hutton's work, from which this section draws liberally, Jean Jones quotes from a wonderfully direct letter that a saddlesore Hutton wrote while on a field-trip in Wales: ‘Lord pity the arse
Author(s): The Open University

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How to Institutionalise Innovation
Family firms provide lessons in creating continuously innovative companies.
Author(s): Morten Bennedsen, INSEAD Professor of Economics an

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Rights not set

3.3 The projective plane

We now consider one of the most important non-orientable surfaces – the projective plane (sometimes called the real projective plane). In Section 2 we introduced it as the surface obtained from a rectangle by identifying each pair of opposite edges in opposite directions, as shown in
Author(s): The Open University

Water supply and treatment in the UK
Have you thought about the journey water makes to get to your taps? What processes has it undergone to make it safe to drink? The tracks in this album examine issues of water supply and treatment in the UK, where each of us uses approximately 150 litres a day! We hear from different parties involved in water management including the bodies representing the consumer, the environment, and the suppliers. The scope of the discussion ranges from wastage and emergency treatment to recycling and efflue
Author(s): The iTunes U team

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