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4.1.3 How do I draw a line graph?

The process is as the steps below outline.

  1. Collect the data.

    In other words, decide on the data that you wish to represent and collect it in a format that shows one value being compared with another.

  2. Decide on a clear title.

    You may be able to use the heading of a table from which you are getting data. Alternatively, you may need to define the title yourself.

  3. Decide on the values that you wish to show on
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4.1.2 When is a line graph not a good format to use?

When you have a large amount of data without an obvious link. For example, when your data shows shares of a whole, in which case, you would use a pie chart.


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3.1.1 When are tables used?

Within your course, tables are likely to be used as a particular structured format to summarise numerical information. They tend to be used to present data as a summary and as a starting point for discussion. But someone always prepares tables. So always be aware of where the table that you are looking at has come from. Could the source be trying to tell you something in particular? For example, if a table were summarising the costs of running a hospital, would you expect figures from the gov
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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • reflect on the reasons for needing to improve skills in using charts, graphs and tables

  • understand the following mathematical concepts and how to use them, through instruction, worked examples and practice activities: reflecting on mathematics; tables; line graphs; bar charts and histograms; pie charts; analysis

  • draw on a technical glossary, plus a a list of references to further reading and sources
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4.4 Bar charts

Bar charts show data in the form of bars that illustrate the relationship between the items of information in terms of size: the bars get larger (generally taller) as the amounts being shown increase.

When the bars touch, they show continuous data. In other words, data that changes gradually along some sort of a scale, for example weight, height, temperature, or length (these charts are called histograms, see Author(s): The Open University

References

Lewis, G. and Phoenix, A. (2004) ‘Race ‘ethnicity’ and identity’ in Questioning Identity, K. Woodward (ed.), London, Routledge/The Open University.
The Runnymede Bulletin (1999) ‘Black deaths in police custody’, no.319, September, pp.8–9.
Sardar, Z., Ravetz, J. and Van Loon, B. (1999) Introducing Mathematics, Cambridge, Icon Books.

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Cognitive Psychology
The consciousness of the human mind has long been a topic of fascination and curiosity amongst writers, artists and psychologists, from Carl Jung and Salvador Dali to Virginia Wolfe and Gertrude Stein. This album explores our understanding of consciousness, and features a discussion on some of psychology's most complex questions: what does it mean to be a conscious human, and what purposes our consciousness serves. This material forms part of The Open University course DD303 Cognitive psychology
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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

EPOCH Psychology history timeline
This free course, EPoCH Psychology history timeline, uses an interactive resource (EPoCH) to gain a better sense of how the historical and social context influences psychological inquiry. You will examine the different methods used by psychologists to investigate human behaviour and learn to identify the different perspectives that exist in psychology. Author(s): Creator not set

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5 Obtaining descriptive statistics

Activity 4

0 hours 20 minutes

This activity demonstrates how a simple dataset can be used to produce some basic statistics. You will see how the data from a simple experiment can
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5 The pedagogy of open learning

One of the key differences between open learning, where the ‘student’ is remote from the teacher, and a learner just reading a textbook or looking up information for themselves on the internet, is the need to encourage active learning. Whether the material is text, online quizzes or audio-visual elements, the learner should not be a passive absorber of information but actively interacting with the resources. This is grounded in views of how people learn. But I have made some assump
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4 Copyright and OER

I assume that you are reading this course because you would like to create a course similar to the materials that you can find on the OpenLearn website. You therefore have a teaching purpose and are particularly interested in the use of online tuition. Hopefully you are also keen to share your teaching materials with others. But why bother creating a new OER? Surely there is so much material already available for free on the web anyway!

I would answer this in a number of ways. First: qu
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3 Finding and evaluating OERs

When seeking content for adaptation and re-use in open educational contexts there are several tools available to support discovery. Many of these tools are the result of experimental prototyping and short-term funded projects, however, and therefore carry with them a certain amount of risk. Not all are sustained beyond the life of the funding, but these initiatives have sought to use a variety of search technologies to support the discovery of generic and domain-specific OERs. As we move forw
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2 What makes a good OER?

What is an open educational resource?

The term ‘open educational resource’ is one that encompasses a broad range of items. It can describe a single image or an entire short course, and materials can be in any medium or a mixture. The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) has defined OERs as ‘digitised materials offered freely and openly for educators, students and
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1 Object-based learning

Harnessing the power of original, real things, that's what learning in museums is all about …

Osborne (2004)

Pupils are handling a Second World War gas mask. This is part of their work on the Home Front. They can feel the weight of the gas mask and smell the stifling warmth of the mask on their face. This gives them a depth of understanding that nothing else could. For the moment they are
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2 Book reviews

The comments below all relate to the same book, Ruby Holler by Sharon Creech, and have been made by pupils at Churchill Community School, North Somerset – the ‘Churchill Chatterboxes’.

A captivating yet far-fetched book, I feel this would suit most younger readers but older readers would want something more demanding. (Margaret)

I think Ruby Holler is a very moving book, especially when Da
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3.1 The Athenians, the Swiss, and Arnold Schwarzenegger

Abraham Lincoln defined democracy as rule of, by and for the people.

If democracy is such a good thing, why don't voters get to decide on policies as well as just vote for candidates? Some countries practise ‘direct democracy’, where people can vote on policy, alongside ‘representative democracy’, where we choose others to decide for us. When democracy was invented, in ancient Athens, it was direct democracy – citizens met face-to-face to make decisions for the city-state (tho
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Introducción

In this session you are going to learn how to ask about different places of interest in Spain, Chile and Uruguay: what they are, where they are and what they look like.

Key learning points

  • Asking and answering where a monument or a building is

  • Describing a building

  • Using estar to indicate location


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1.4 Actividad

Actividad 1.4

1 Look at the following pictures and write two sentences describing each building. Use the nouns and adjectives from the boxes below, and don't forget to put the appropriate endings! You can either use the co
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1.3 Actividad

Vocabulario

puente(el) bridge
inacabado unfinished
jardines (los) gardens
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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • describe places in Spanish

  • give and understand directions in Spanish

  • talk about urban transport in Spanish

  • navigate around a building in Spain.


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