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1 What is open learning and why OERs?

Names quickly become loaded: distance learning, supported self-study, computer-based training/computer-aided instruction, home study and flexistudy, to name but a few, have all been used to describe self-instruction or self-study and many of these terms are thought wanting. The UK Open University is sometimes described as a ‘distance learning institution’, yet the support that students receive from their tutor through telephone, email and face-to-face tutorials, and through correspondence
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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • state personal motivation for producing and using OERs

  • evaluate some examples of educational resources for active open learning

  • plan a structured learning experience using a range of resources

  • produce, release and use OER

  • understand how to evaluate teaching resources.


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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • clarify ideas on literacy criticism

  • explore with pupils what makes a good book

  • produce a range of writing frames to encourage pupils to write book reviews

  • encourage pupils to follow some of the award schemes for children's books and perhaps start a new one.


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Conclusion

This free course provided an introduction to studying Computing & IT. It took you through a series of exercises designed to develop your approach to study and learning at a distance, and helped to improve your confidence as an independent learner.


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A brief history of communication: hieroglyphics to emojis
This free course, A brief history of communication: hieroglyphics to emojis, is an introduction to the history of writing, and the key role it plays in human communication. It tracks this history from the invention of writing around 5500 years ago to the mass popularity of emojis today. First published on Tue, 18 Dec 2018 as Author(s): Creator not set

1.2.1 Using 'on'

Grammar Point 3 – Using ‘on’ to say ‘you’, ‘we’ or ‘people’

1. On can be translated into English as ‘you’ in a general sense.

  • La vie n’est pas agréable si on doit travailler à Paris au mois d’août.

  • Life is not pleasant if you have to work in Paris in August.

2. The most common use of on in French is as a familiar equivalent of nous. Jacq
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1.1 Factors influencing a relocation decision

In this section you consider why companies decide to relocate and the factors that attract them to a new location. You study two companies looking for a new site and practise structures to express needs and requirements.

Relocation involves ‘push factors’ and ‘pull factors’. Push factors are things that make a company want to move from a location. Pull factors attract a company to a new location. In Author(s): The Open University

2.3 The body's different systems

The body has a variety of different internal systems such as the skeleton, the collection of muscles, and the network of arteries and veins. To understand properly how the body works, we need to understand these separate systems as well as the links between them.

Activity 1: What you need to
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2.2 The body as a machine

This is a useful way of thinking if we want to understand some basic aspects of how the body works in its relation to sport. We can think of the body as a device that operates on simple mechanical principles, that needs to be fuelled and that uses up this fuel as it is driven harder.

Figure 1
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7 Moving to a positive paradigm

Aaron Antonovsky (1984) has called the emphasis on illness and disease the pathogenic paradigm and has stated that this disease-focused paradigm has dominated our healthcare system. He claims that there are five important consequences of this domination:

  1. ‘We have come to think dichotomously about people, classifying them as either healthy or diseased’ (p. 115). Those categorised as ‘healthy’ are normal, those categorised as non-healthy or ‘di
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Acknowledgements

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions), this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence.

The material acknowledged below is Proprietary and used under licence (not subject
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1.3 Activities

Activity 2A sets the scene by focusing on the 'big picture' where you will be asked to choose between four alternative visions of the future. This activity radically shifts the scale of investigation from the personal to the global. However, as with all systems, the emergent behaviour of society is a resul
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3.1 The steps to systems modelling

Systems modelling in practice usually involves six broad steps, within each of which there may be many subsidiary steps and some checking and revision. There is also likely to be iteration back to the earlier steps, as issues which call for changes in earlier decisions are uncovered.

Nevertheless, in my experience, the following six steps are likely to cover the basics.

  1. Identify the system of interest, in particular specify the system boundary a
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3.2 Making sense of the metaphor

The metaphor of the juggler keeping the four balls in the air is a powerful way for me to think about what I do when I try to be effective in my practice. It matches with my experience: it takes concentration and skill to do it well. But metaphors conceal features of experience, as well as calling them to attention. The juggler metaphor conceals that the four elements of effective practice often seem to be related. I cannot juggle them as if they were independent of each other. I can imagine
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2.1 The nature of systems thinking and systems practice

There are no simple definitions for either systems thinking or systems practice. It's difficult to find definitions that capture all the perspectives that the ideas carry for people who think of themselves as systems thinkers and systems practitioners. Most systems practitioners seem to experience the same kind of difficulty in explaining what they do or what it means to be systemic in their thinking. Through experience I've developed some criteria by which I characterize systems thinking, bu
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Keep on learning

Study another free course

There are more than 800 courses on OpenLearn for you to
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3.5.1 Contact mode

Contact mode produces images with the highest resolution. This is because when the probe tip is as close as it can be to the surface, the influence of atoms other than the one directly under the probe tip is relatively small. This is a simple geometrical effect – if the tip were withdrawn a large distance from the surface, a large number of atoms would be at a very similar distance from the tip, and therefore would have a similar contribution to the overall force. In contact mode, the repul
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2.3 The fabrication process for a MEMS Pirani sensor

This section is fairly long, but is best read in one go. If you run out of time, reschedule your study to allow you to start again from here.

Thin layers of material are added to the surface by a variety of means, depending on the material to be deposited, and what is already on the wafer.

The sensor starts off, as so many microsensors do, with a silicon wafer, shown in cross section in Author(s): The Open University

5.8 Design problems

Table 7 summarises the many design problems of the piers uncovered by Mr Law and his team. We have already seen the numerous fractured lugs in the remains of the bridge, shown in Author(s): The Open University

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