2.14 Summing up

Activity 13

0 hours 5 minutes

Dr. Peterson concludes the audio sequence with a summary of all the points covered.


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2.2 Users' experiences of the therapeutic relationship

CAM users may seek a very different type of therapeutic relationship from those they experience with orthodox practitioners. Some people may want to spend more time with a CAM practitioner than they do with their GP, to have more say in determining the frequency of access to practitioners, to have more control over what happens in the consultation room, and to have more choice about the treatments they are given.

In any therapeutic encounter, people want to be treated with respect, to b
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12.1.1 Survey questionnaires

Questionnaires are lists of questions that enable information to be gathered efficiently from a relatively large number of respondents. Most questionnaires require a fixed type of response, such as a choice between available answers, or along a scale of response. For example, a product design questionnaire might suggest, ‘I found the product easy to use’ and provide a five-point scale of response from ‘agree strongly’ to ‘disagree strongly’. Or a question might be, ‘how often do
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Introduction

Social scientists collect evidence to support their claims and theories in different ways. Such evidence is crucial to the practice of social science and to the production of social scientific knowledge.

You may be aware of the idea of active reading, which is about reading with the aim of understanding and grasping something: a definition, an argument, a piece of evidence. What that suggests is that active reading is about reading and thinking at the same time. In
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Introduction

From the moment that Galileo dropped two cannonballs of different sizes and weights from the top of the Leaning Tower of Pisa mankind has been fascinated by the impact of gravity. This unit looks at gravity, its impact on objects and how the energy involved in the movement of objects is dispersed or stored.

This unit is from our archive and is an adapted extract from How the universe works (S197) which is no longer taught by The Open University. If you want to study formally with us, yo
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2.2.1 Surfaces without boundary

Examples of surfaces without boundary are a sphere and a torus. Other examples are the following:

n-fold toruses

Figure 13 depicts a 2-fold torus and a 3-fold torus, with two and three rings respectively. An n-fold torus, for any positive integer n has n rings. (A 1-fold torus is
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Literary Festival 2016: Progress in Troubled Times: learning from "The Age of Genius" [Audio]
Speaker(s): Professor AC Grayling | What happened to the European mind between 1605, when an audience watching Macbeth at the Globe might believe that regicide was such an aberration of the natural order that ghosts could burst from the ground, and 1649, when a large crowd, perhaps including some who had seen Macbeth forty-four years earlier, could stand and watch the execution of a king? Or consider the difference between a magus casting a star chart and the day in 1639, when Jonathan Horrock a
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3.3.1 Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase)

Members of this family of lipid kinases usually have two subunits: one is a catalytic subunit with a lipid kinase domain and the other is a regulatory subunit, which contains two SH2 domains and a SH3 domain (p 85 PI 3-kinase in Figure 13).

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6.2.1 Studio conventions in street photography

Activity 23

Look at Images 81 and 82. Given your knowledge of conventional studio portraiture, can you see any similarities between studio and street practice?

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Former clerk and Vanderbilt law professor talks about legacy of Justice Antonin Scalia
Vanderbilt Law School professor Brian Fitzpatrick, who clerked for the late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, discusses the man and how the conservative justice revolutionized a movement in the Supreme Court in terms of how cases are analyzed and debated.
Author(s): Amy Wolf

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6.3 Seaside photography

Image 88 Photographer/Painter: Anon. Subject: New Brighton beach featuring the canvas tent studio of James Ravenscroft, 1880s.

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17.2 Getting finance and organisational backing

Like talk, ideas are cheap. Even generating a prototype of an invention can be cheap compared with the resources needed to produce and market an innovation. The independent inventor or designer is likely to have to rely on family and friends for financial backing, particularly in the early stages. Seed capital is sometimes available in the form of innovation grants from government bodies, such as the Department for Trade and Industry in the UK, which offers development funding to individuals
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#390: The human cost of hate: The lasting damage caused by homophobia and transphobia

Psychiatric epidemiologist Professor Michael King discusses the devastating psychological harm suffered by victims of homophobia and transphobia. He also examines the role of families, governments and religion in curbing the problem. Presented by Lynne Haultain.

 


Author(s): up-close@unimelb.edu.au (University of Melbourne)

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#393: Antagonize your ageing: The science behind living healthier for longer

Geriatrician Professor Andrea Maier describes what happens to our cells as we age, and explains the causes of age-related diseases. She also discusses how positive lifestyle choices and preventive medical interventions can help us live healthier for longer. Presented by Dr Andi Horvath.


Author(s): up-close@unimelb.edu.au (University of Melbourne)

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Module team

The T552 course team

Andy Lane, course team chair and author (1999) Karen Shipp, course team chair (2002)

Rosalind Armson, author and critical reader

Jake Chapman, author

Eion Farmer, author and critical reader

John Hamwee, author

John Martin, author

Laurence Newman, course manager

Wendy Fisher, author

John Hudson, author

Graham Paton, author

Roberts, author

Christine Bla
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8.3 Synthesis of information

The synthesis needs to show you can:

  • evaluate and synthesise information and present sources correctly;

  • identify the various arguments and present your interpretation in a way that brings together information in a coherent way;

  • prepare an oral presentation for delivery and be prepared to lead a discussion of it.

Your presentation and discussion needs to show you can:

    <
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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • discuss how the gas mixture expelled from the engine, and the conversion performance of the three-way catalytic converter, depend on the air/fuel (A/F) ratio

  • list the chemical reactions whereby the three-way catalyst removes carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbons and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) from petrol vehicle exhausts

  • interpret the results of experimental studies (involving activity
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Conclusion

This free course provided an introduction to studying education. It took you through a series of exercises designed to develop your approach to study and learning at a distance and helped to improve your confidence as an independent learner.


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Diagramming Sentences With Adjectives
This video defines and gives examples of adjectives.  Diagramming sentences with adjectives is explained step-by-step.  Examples appear on a white screen and are explained by a narrator. ( 1:48)
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RVC 28 - Dietary Fatty Acids and Fertility of Humans and Animals
We’re constantly told that too much fat in our diet is bad for the health of ourselves and our animals. However it now seems that very particular types of fats are implicated in determining not only animal health but their reproductive performance. Here Dr Robert Abayasekara and Prof Claire Wathes of the Department Of Veterinary Basic Sciences at the RVC explain their work demonstrating the effect of different polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) on human and animal fertility.
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