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We Write the Songs: ASCAP Concert 2012
The Library hosted the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP) Foundation for its annual event "We Write the Songs," a night of songwriters performing their own tunes and telling the stories behind their creations. Performers included Terri Nunn, Ray Parker Jr., Irving Burgie, Stephen Bishop, Melanie, Dan Foliart, Dino Fekaris, Chris Stapleton, Stephen Schwartz, Valerie Simpson (of Ashford & Simpson fame) and ASCAP president Paul Williams. For more information, visit http:
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Dyslexie-Express
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Op deze site vind je meer info over de Dyslexie-Express. De Dyslexie-Express bevat materiaal om leerlingen met dyslexie op sociaal-emotioneel gebied te ondersteunen. Het kan een leerling met dyslexie erg helpen om zich te …


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Voyage on the High Seas
This game is suitable for play both within and outside of the classroom, and although designed for children ages 9-13, it offers a fun, learning opportunity for the entire family. In addition to being a game, it is an eye-catching poster showing continents, oceans and all of the major ocean currents. On the reverse, there are black and white educational activities designed to be reproduced directly from the poster for use in the classroom.
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Polyelectrolyte Multilayers

audio rough cut uploaded 12/4/12


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VUCast Extra: Celebrating at Vandy’s Bowl Announcement Party
Where are you spending New Year’s Eve?  Watching about 1,400 people celebrating at the Vanderbilt bowl announcement party will get you in the mood to cheer the Dores to a victory at the Franklin American Mortgage Music City Bowl. Visit Bowl Central for more information.
Author(s): Vanderbilt News and Communications

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Managing coastal environments
Coastal environments are by their nature ever-changing. This unit looks at the example of the Blackwater Estuary in Essex, England, describing how the current state of the estuary came to be. It examines the contests and conflicts that centre on the estuary in terms of managing the environment for human needs and the needs of the other species who make their habitat there.Author(s): Creator not set

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Water use and the water cycle
Water is arguably the most important physical resource as it is the one that is essential to human survival. Understanding the global water cycle and how we use water is essential to planning a sustainable source of water for the future. Water use and the water cycle is a free course designed to give the student an introduction to the subject. Author(s): Creator not set

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Earth's physical resources: petroleum
The discovery of the world's first major underground oil field in Pennsylvania, USA in 1859 sparked the continuing era of the world's reliance on cheap energy from oil and gas. This free course, Earth's physical resources: petroleum, begins by examining the geological characteristics of petroleum and the key ingredients necessary to form oil and gas accumulations. Then there is a brief description of industrial operations during the life cycle of an oil field, starting with subsurface analysis a
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Test kits for water analysis
This free course, Test kits for water analysis, steps outside the laboratory to look at some examples of analytical procedures being carried out in the field using commercial test kits. These quick tests provide results on-site, extending the options available to analysts. The methods used are chemical or microbiological in nature, made portable by microelectronics.Author(s): Creator not set

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Acknowledgements

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions), this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence.

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission to reproduce material in this unit:

Author(s): The Open University

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6.3 Valence-shell electron-pair repulsion theory

The theory of molecular shape that we have been working towards is called valence-shell electron-pair repulsion theory (VSEPR theory). When applied to molecules and ions of the typical elements, its success rate is high. Here is a stepwise procedure that you can follow when applying this theory. It is illustrated with the molecule XeF4 and the ion C1O3. Xenon tetrafluoride is one of the select band of noble gas compounds that were unknown before 1962
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4.5.2 Noble gas configurations under stress

It is remarkable how many molecules and ions of the typical elements can be represented by Lewis structures in which each atom has a noble gas shell structure. Nevertheless, many exceptions exist. According to the periodic trends summarised in Section 2, the highest fluorides of boron and phosphorus are BF3 and PF5. How
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4.5.1 Lewis structures

G.N. Lewis used the shared electron-pair bond to re-express structural formulae in an electronic form. Examples appeared in Figure 28, where the sharing leads to Lewis structures in which each atom has the shell structure of a noble gas.


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4.3 Metallic bonding

Two familiar properties of metals point to a simple model of metallic bonding. Firstly, metals have a strong tendency to form positive ions. Thus, when sodium reacts with water, and when magnesium and aluminium react with acids, hydrogen gas is evolved and the ions Na+(aq), Mg2+(aq) and Al3+(aq), respectively, are formed. Secondly, metals are good conductors of electricity: when a voltage difference is applied
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3.4 Outer electronic configurations and the Periodic Table

The essential message of Figure 22 is that the Groups of elements that appear in columns of the Periodic Table usually have atoms with similar outer electronic configurations. Figure 23 incorporates these configurations into our mini-Periodic Table of typical elements; they appear at the top of each Group. They imply that the typi
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3.3 Electronic configurations and the Periodic Table

Figure 21 has been designed for use in a particular thought experiment. The purpose of the thought experiment is to see how the electronic configuration of the atoms changes as one moves through the Periodic Table from beginning to end. We start with the hydrogen atom, which has one proton and one electron. Then we
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Money talks: More 'glanceability'


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9 Summary

Now you will be very familiar with cardiovascular diseases, their development and their diagnosis. You will also know their treatment and many of the cardiovascular disease risk factors – what they are and how they can be influenced positively to minimise cardiovascular diseases. You will understand the overall importance of a balanced diet, regular exercise and weight management (guided by adiposity measurements) throughout life, to maintain cardiac and vascular health. You will also be a
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Introduction

You may have met complex numbers before, but not had experience in manipulating them. This course gives an accessible introduction to complex numbers, which are very important in science and technology, as well as mathematics. The course includes definitions, concepts and techniques which will be very helpful and interesting to a wide variety of people with a reasonable background in algebra and trigonometry.

This OpenLearn course provides a sample of Level 3 study in Author(s): The Open University

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Copyright © 2016 The Open University

5.1 Arithmetic with real numbers

At the end of Section 1, we discussed the decimals and asked whether it is possible to add and multiply these numbers to obtain another real number. We now explain how this can be done using the Least Upper Bound Property of Author(s): The Open University

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