Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • recognise definitions and applications of key terms relating to mental health

  • understand and apply basic grammatical terminology

  • describe briefly the different types of sounds used in speech in both acoustic and articulatory terms

  • outline the key features of human language as compared to the vocalisations of other species

  • describe the complex psychological processes inv
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2.7 Fluorine (F)

Fluoride ions (F ) are rare in foods, though some are found in tea and in seafood. However, fluoride does occur naturally in some water supplies, derived from the rocks through which the water flows. Its only role in the body appears to be to help to protect teeth from decay.

The stages of tooth decay are as follows:

  • bacteria live in saliva on teeth (form plaque)

  • produce lactic acid → dissolves calcium salts in too
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1.3.6 Summary of Section 3

In this section, you have learned about appropriate ways of interpreting data in tables. By working through examples, you have seen how it can be useful to calculate appropriate proportions and ratios, and to present some of the data in graphical form. Guidelines for the choice of graphics have been given. When the data in a table are in the form of counts, you have seen that it can be useful to calculate the counts in a particular row or column as proportions (usually in the form of percenta
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Escape Self-Absorption through Positive Emotions
This is a ninety-minute lecture.
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3.4 The ‘flanker’ effect

A potential problem for the feature integration theory is the fact that the time taken to understand the meaning of a printed word can be influenced by other, nearby words. Of itself, this is not surprising, because it is well known that one word can prime (i.e. speed decisions to) another related word; the example nurse – doctor was given in Secti
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Academic Writing Symposium, Chapter 8
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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions), this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

The material acknowledged below is Proprietary and used under licence (not subject to Creativ
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References

Anderson, M. (1993) ‘The social implications of demographic change’ in Thompson, F.M.L. (ed.) The Cambridge Social History of Britain Vol. 2, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.
Bainham, A. (1999) ‘Defining parenthood: parentage, parenthood and parental responsibility – subtle, elusive yet important distinctions’ in Bainham, A., Sclater, S.D. and Richards, M. (eds) What is a Parent? A Socio-Lega
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“These could revolutionize the world” — Pint cracks code to cheap, small carbon nanotubes
Imagine a box you plug into the wall that cleans your toxic air and pays you cash. That's essentially what Vanderbilt University researchers produced after discovering the blueprint for turning carbon dioxide into the most valuable material ever sold – carbon nanotubes with small diameters.
Author(s): Heidi Hall

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3.1 Introduction

Surrounded by the ever-present threat of ill health, not surprisingly, people expended a good deal of time and energy on trying to stay well. The late nineteenth century saw a new emphasis on promoting health, which was defined as ‘a state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity’ (quoted in Riley, 1997, p. 199). Health was not simply a desirable end in itself. The pursuit of health was portrayed as a moral duty: parents had a
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President George Washington, Part IX
Final installment of the animated biography of the life of President George Washington. This Discovery Education video is aimed at elementary school children.
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Introduction

This unit will help you to identify and use information in Science and Nature, whether for your work, study or personal purposes. Experiment with some of the key resources in this subject area, and learn about the skills which will enable you to plan searches for information, so you can find what you are looking for more easily. Discover the meaning of information quality, and learn how to evaluate the information you come across. You will also be introduced to the many different ways of orga
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2 Explaining fertility decline from a feminist perspective

Feminist theory underpins one of the most influential historiographies of fertility decline and it allows us to foreground gender as a dominant feature in questions of heterosexuality and parenthood. This is not to suggest that divisions of class, ‘race’, (dis)ability and generation are unimportant in this historical phenomenon, and any full understanding of fertility decline would be incomplete without including them. But in this unit the main focus will be on gender and these other soci
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Acknowledgements

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions), this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

The material acknowledged below is Proprietary and used under licence (not subject to Creativ
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4.4.1 Voltage, current and resistance

Voltage (or, more correctly, electromotive force, emf – but I shall follow common practice and just say voltage) is a measure of the force with which electricity is 'pushed'. Nothing happens, however, unless there is an electric circuit, which is a path from one terminal of a voltage source (the battery, in this case) to the other, along which the electricity can flow (Author(s): The Open University

Ah Bon French School Supplies Slap


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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • understand the Enlightenment ideas that underpinned Robert Owen's social reform agenda

  • understand how Owen's background and experience at New Lanark fed through into his thinking in the essays in A New View of Society

  • understand the main proposals in the essays

  • understand New Lanark's role as a model for social reform during this period.


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Laboratory Waste Streams Biological Sciences Building 85
Laboratory Waste Streams Biological Sciences Building 85
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The content acknowledged below is Proprietary (see terms and conditions) and is used under licence.

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission to reproduce material in this course:

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11.941 Learning by Comparison: First World/Third World Cities (MIT)
The primary purpose of this seminar is to enable students to craft approaches to so-called "First World"/ "Third World" city comparisons that are theoretically sophisticated, methodologically rigorous, contextually grounded, and significantly beneficial. Since there exists very little literature and very few projects which compare "First World" and "Third World" cities in a sophisticated and genuinely useful manner, the seminar is structured around a series of readings, case studies, and discuss
Author(s): Inam, Aseem

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Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative C