Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • relate the temperature of a solid to the mean kinetic energy of its atoms

  • use models for thermally induced effects that involve linear, exponential and step changes

  • use exponentials, logarithms and graphical methods to interpret data from a thermally activated process in terms of Arrhenius's law

  • identify the changes of phase taking place in a variety of critical phenomena


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5.3 The outcomes of the public debate

Box 2 contains an edited version of the Executive Summary of the document GM Nation? Findings of the Public Debate. This is a lengthy summary, but it is worth exploring in some detail. The unedited version can be found on http://www.gmnation.org.uk/.


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6.1 What is a pie chart?

A pie chart is a circular chart (pie-shaped); it is split into segments to show percentages or the relative contributions of categories of data.

6.1.1 When are pie charts used?

A pie chart gives an immediate visual idea of the relative sizes of the shares of a whole. It is a good method of representation if you wish to compare a part of a group with the whole group. You could us
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Brugoefeningen tot 20 : Hulpmiddel
brugoefening_tot_20.png

Hulpmiddel om leerlingen te helpen die het moeilijk hebben om brugoefeningen tot 20 op te lossen. Leerlingen splitsen het tweede getal en ze kunnen de oefeningen visueel voorstellen in een 10-rooster.


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Introduction

Active galaxies provide a prime example of high-energy processes operating in the Universe. This course introduces the evidence for activity from the spectra of some galaxies, and the concept of a compact active galactic nucleus as a unifying model for the observed features of several types of active galaxy. It also develops the key skill of applying arithmetic and simple algebra to solving scientific problems.

This OpenLearn course is an adapted extract from the Open University course
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Glossary

Open glossary now...


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1.5.3 Summary of Section 1.5

  1. Some annual plants and insects can spend the winter at juvenile stages, such as seed, egg, larva or pupa. Butterflies in Britain display a variety of juvenile overwintering strategies.

  2. Migration often results in high mortality, but completion of the journey results in higher breeding success, due to increased availability of food and fewer competitors.

  3. Birds increase their body mass, sometimes by up to 50%, prior to migration. T
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References

Durant, J., Bauer, M., Gaskell, G., Midden, C., Liakopoulos, M. and Scholten, L. (2000) ‘Two cultures of public understanding of science andtechnology in Europe’ in Dierkes, M. and Von Grote, C. (eds) Between Understanding and Trust: the Public, Science and Technology, Amsterdam: Harwood Academic Publishers.

Windbags - Cool Science Experiment
How many breaths does it take to inflate an 2 meter (8 ft) Windbag? 70 breaths, maybe? Why even try? With a simple science secret you can amaze your  friends by blowing up a Windbag in one breath! If you don't believe it, try this amazing science activity! Windbags are so light and strong that even the smallest scientist can demonstrate the amazing properties of air!
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Keep on learning

Study another free course

There are more than 800 courses on OpenLearn for you to cho
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2.2.2 Hollow tubing surfaces

In their doughnut-shaped representation, toruses can be thought of as being hollow tubes. Many other surfaces in space can also be drawn as if they were made of hollow tubing. Figure 15 shows two such examples.

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2.6 Going back

Capturing bits of reality and transferring them to a computer would be a pointless exercise if they stayed locked in the digital world. We want access to what we've captured. We want to see the results. In particular, we may want to look at our captive in a different form. For instance, suppose we input the series of temperature readings shown in Author(s): The Open University

4.1.1 Space problems

Probably the best known of these is the fact that the internet is running out of space for identifying computers. Each computer in a network needs to be identified by a unique data pattern known as an IP address. The current technology used to transport data around the internet is such that in the comparatively near future we shall run out of space to hold these unique addresses. Happily this is a problem that has been identified and groups of researchers around the globe have developed new t
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Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

5.5.3 Plotters

A plotter is a special type of printing device mostly used by architects, engineers and map makers. Here the printed output is produced by moving a pen across the paper. Sometimes several differently coloured pens are available. Plotters are obviously most suitable for line drawings, which is why architects, for instance, use them. I've mentioned them here, however, because – in contrast with monitors and printers – they produce an analogue output directly.


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1.4 Number lines

It is often useful in mathematics to think of numbers stretched out along the imaginary number line. The diagram below shows part of the number line.

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