Veterans History Project Congressional Staff Briefing
Staff of the Veterans History Project make their annual briefing to Congressional staff. Speakers included Betsy Peterson, Bob Patrick, Patrick Burns, Florence Champagne, Lloyd Lenhart and Lisa Taylor. For transcript, captions, and more information, visit http://www.loc.gov/today/cyberlc/feature_wdesc.php?rec=6324
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2.5.1 Try some yourself

Activity 27

What are the following?

  • (a) 10

  • (b) 01

  • (c) 20

  • (d) 02


Author(s): The Open University

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7.1 Introduction

Charts, graphs and tables are all very helpful ways of representing a set of data. However, they are not the only ways of passing on information about data. This section looks at how you can analyse a set of data to summarise the given information as briefly and simply as possible.

Essentially, there are two features of a set of data that enable summarising: the average and the spread. This section starts by looking at what is meant by ‘average’. If you have already studied OpenL
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1.1.1 Simple boxplots

It is a common observation that a data exploration should always begin by looking at a graphical display of the data. When looking at data sets which involve only one variable, displays such as bar charts and histograms are available. One problem with these is that they can include too much detail. Also they are not very useful for comparing two or more samples of data. A graphical display showing certain summary statistics in a visually appealing and interpretable way is introduced in this s
Author(s): The Open University

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5.1.1 Do you dread deadlines?

Of course, there are lots of different patterns of working: some students can only work to deadlines at the very last minute; while others prefer to work in shorter snatches over longer periods. The main problem with the former is that you may have to skip over some of the points we are now discussing, which could be counter-productive.

Waiting until the last minute may be because you are afraid to begin. If this applies to you – as it will to many others – you might find it helpful
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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • develop an appreciation of the huge variety of different mammals that exist on Earth today

  • see how fossil evidence can help us to understand evolutionary history

  • understand how the structure of DNA can help us to detect differences between different species

  • apply the techniques of DNA analysis to work out which mammals are most closely related to each other

  • appreciate t
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4.4 Groups

If we agree that the posing of individuals carried messages for the viewer it makes sense that the posing of family groups can similarly be made to convey suggestions about the family and its character.


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6.2.2 The Earth's motion relative to the 3 K radiation

Radiation has energy and momentum, so we can use the molecules of a fluid such as air as an analogy for the photons of radiation. A detector pointing forwards along the direction of our motion (if any) will encounter a greater number of photons than a detector pointing backwards; in other words, it will record a higher intensity of 3 K radiation. (If the detector is tuned to a narrow band of frequencies one would also have to take account of the change in observed spectrum, but the principle
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5 Obtaining descriptive statistics

Activity 4

0 hours 20 minutes

This activity demonstrates how a simple dataset can be used to produce some basic statistics. You will see how the data from a simple experiment can be described in a
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8.3.2 Identify the outcomes you hope to achieve

An outcome is the result or consequence of a process. For example, you may want contribute effectively to a design project in a course, or work in a team to improve a product or system. In this case the design or product improvement is an outcome, and using your problem-solving skills is part of the process by which you achieve that outcome. You may find it useful to discuss or negotiate the outcomes you hope to achieve with others. Solving problems will often depend to some extent on other k
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6.3 How a gamma camera works

Activity 13

Before we look at a patient being imaged and some of the images which can be obtained using this technique, we will look in a bit more detail at how a gamma camera works. Watch the following video clip and note
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Amusing introduction to beryllium
This introduction to the element beryllium (atomic number 4) covers its main uses and properties.  It is very toxic, invisible to x-rays, expensive, and used in some high-tech equipment.  Those working with beryllium are advised not to lick their fingers.  Combines amusing demonstrations with talking to the camera by a wild-haired chemistry professor.  Part of a series called Author(s): No creator set

Virtual Maths, Cuboid - Excavation quiz1
Interactive simulaton explaining how to calculate cubic capacity of a truck for carrying excavated materials
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Study another free course

There are more than 800 courses on OpenLearn for you to choose from on
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2.6 Context and language variation

As well as contributing to meaning, context can also influence the actual words and sentences that we use. Do you sometimes say ‘Hi’ and at other times say ‘Good morning’? Do you have a ‘telephone voice’? This variation in language may be done deliberately, but often it is not. There are two main reasons as to why we adjust the way we speak:

  • to fit in with our audience or what we feel they expect of us; you may use ‘professional’ langu
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1.11 Addition and subtraction in practice - fluid balance

A common healthcare example that uses addition and subtraction involves calculating the fluid balance of a patient.

Fluid balance is a simple but very useful way to estimate whether a patient is either becoming dehydrated or overfilled with liquids. It is calculated, on a daily basis, by adding up the total volume of liquid that has gone into their body (drinks, oral liquid medicines, intravenous drips, transfusions), then adding up the total volume of liquid that has come out of their
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Lecture 27 - 11/24/2010
Lecture 27
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Chem 51C (Spring 2012): Acid-Catalyzed Formation of Hydrates, Hemiacetals, and Acetals from Aldehyde
Spring Quarter 2012, Lecture 7 for Chem 51C: Organic Chemistry recorded on Tuesday, April 24. Items covered: Ch. 21. Acid-Catalyzed Formation of Hydrates, Hemiacetals, and Acetals from Aldehydes and Ketones.
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6.3 What is the main requirement for regional government? Is it a shared identity?

If we compare the UK with other Western democracies such as Spain, Italy or Germany – all endowed with decentralised structures allowing various degrees of political autonomy for their regions – we discover that strong regional identity, as in Catalonia, the Veneto and Bavaria, is always a very important feature. However, some newly created regions such as La Rioja and Madrid in Spain also exercise devolved powers. What unites them is a common interest; the belief that regional government
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