Business Japanese for Beginners #2 - Asking Someone to Repeat Their Name in Japanese
Learn Business Japanese with JapanesePod101.com! Whether you’ve just started working for a Japanese company or started doing business with one, you’ll need some polished and professional Japanese words and phrases to make a good impression. And that’s exactly where this new Business Japanese series comes in! In this lesson, you will learn [...]
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FALL SEM 2015 CAT 1 EXAM

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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • evaluate technical descriptions of communication protocols and demonstrate an understanding of their operation

  • describe the characteristics of circuit-switched and packet-switched networks, and of connectionless and connection-oriented modes in packet-switched networks

  • describe the role played by primitives in the OSI reference model

  • explain how ‘vertical’ and ‘horizontal’ com
    Author(s): The Open University

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Perfect Social Monitoring Tool For Your Brand

Video link (see supported sites below). Please use the original link, not the shortcut, e.g. www.youtube.com/watch?v=abcde

Author(s): ChristopherJWatters

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4.2.5 Emotions

Emotions can be easily misunderstood when you can't see faces or body language. People may not realise you are joking; irony and satire are easily missed. Smileys or emoticons such as :-) and :-( can be used to express your feelings (look at these sideways). Other possibilities are punctuation (?! #@*!), or , , or even using mock HTML tags such as smileys are stupid.

Remember that many discussion systems only support plain text so you can't rel
Author(s): The Open University

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5.2 The value of the text

We now turn to a critical assessment of the poem as a poem; the question is, is it a ‘good’ poem? To that we should add ‘of its kind’. As we saw, we must judge it as a lyric poem – it would be inappropriate to think of it in the same terms as, say, an epic, because the conventions that govern the epic's form (its subject matter, purposes and formal elements) are very different. It is always important to understand what kind of text you are dealing with no
Author(s): The Open University

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2.7 Fluorine (F)

Fluoride ions (F ) are rare in foods, though some are found in tea and in seafood. However, fluoride does occur naturally in some water supplies, derived from the rocks through which the water flows. Its only role in the body appears to be to help to protect teeth from decay.

The stages of tooth decay are as follows:

  • bacteria live in saliva on teeth (form plaque)

  • produce lactic acid → dissolves calcium salts in too
    Author(s): The Open University

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1.3.6 Summary of Section 3

In this section, you have learned about appropriate ways of interpreting data in tables. By working through examples, you have seen how it can be useful to calculate appropriate proportions and ratios, and to present some of the data in graphical form. Guidelines for the choice of graphics have been given. When the data in a table are in the form of counts, you have seen that it can be useful to calculate the counts in a particular row or column as proportions (usually in the form of percenta
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Escape Self-Absorption through Positive Emotions
This is a ninety-minute lecture.
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3.4 The ‘flanker’ effect

A potential problem for the feature integration theory is the fact that the time taken to understand the meaning of a printed word can be influenced by other, nearby words. Of itself, this is not surprising, because it is well known that one word can prime (i.e. speed decisions to) another related word; the example nurse – doctor was given in Secti
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Academic Writing Symposium, Chapter 8
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Acknowledgements

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions), this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

The material acknowledged below is Proprietary and used under licence (not subject to Creativ
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Ocean Currents
We hear about strange things from distant places that get washed up on our shores all the time.  But how did they get there? Learn more about ocean currents. (01:20)
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References

Anderson, M. (1993) ‘The social implications of demographic change’ in Thompson, F.M.L. (ed.) The Cambridge Social History of Britain Vol. 2, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.
Bainham, A. (1999) ‘Defining parenthood: parentage, parenthood and parental responsibility – subtle, elusive yet important distinctions’ in Bainham, A., Sclater, S.D. and Richards, M. (eds) What is a Parent? A Socio-Lega
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“These could revolutionize the world” — Pint cracks code to cheap, small carbon nanotubes
Imagine a box you plug into the wall that cleans your toxic air and pays you cash. That's essentially what Vanderbilt University researchers produced after discovering the blueprint for turning carbon dioxide into the most valuable material ever sold – carbon nanotubes with small diameters.
Author(s): Heidi Hall

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3.4 Input and output considerations

CCDs are not inherently able to detect colour, only brightness. So it is necessary to rely on the fact that any colour of light can be made up from the three primary colours of light: red, blue and green. (Note that the three primary colours of light are different from the three primary colours of pigments.) Each CCD in the array is therefore overlaid with a red, blue or green filter and so detects the brightness of, respectively, the red light, the blue light or the green light falling on it
Author(s): The Open University

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3.1 Introduction

Surrounded by the ever-present threat of ill health, not surprisingly, people expended a good deal of time and energy on trying to stay well. The late nineteenth century saw a new emphasis on promoting health, which was defined as ‘a state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity’ (quoted in Riley, 1997, p. 199). Health was not simply a desirable end in itself. The pursuit of health was portrayed as a moral duty: parents had a
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French Basics - How to Pronounce Vowel Blends Plus the Letter 'H'
This video offers the correct way to say the combination/blend of vowels plus the letter 'H'. (01:42) Each blend/combination is said once while the narrator pauses for you to repeat. (Perhaps the video might be better served if it showed an example of a word with the blend, rather than just the blend itself.)
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Introduction

This unit will help you to identify and use information in Science and Nature, whether for your work, study or personal purposes. Experiment with some of the key resources in this subject area, and learn about the skills which will enable you to plan searches for information, so you can find what you are looking for more easily. Discover the meaning of information quality, and learn how to evaluate the information you come across. You will also be introduced to the many different ways of orga
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The Magic School Bus Goes To Mussel Beach - Tidal Zones
The class is enjoying a normal day at the beach until Ms. Frizzle discovers a letter from Uncle Shelby. He needs the class to look after his beachfront property. The kids soon discover that his supposedly luxurious accommodation is actually a tiny spot on the shoreline. Why would anyone live in a spot where youre battered by waves at high tide and baked by the sun at low tide? To find out the answer, Ms. Frizzle turns the kids into...mussels! (22mins)
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