16.2.2 Storing and retrieving data

As each item is scanned, the checkout computer looks up its price. The running total for each customer's purchases is stored temporarily in the checkout terminal. Other data may also be stored, such as the amount of money that has been taken at that checkout during the day.


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17.2 Getting finance and organisational backing

Like talk, ideas are cheap. Even generating a prototype of an invention can be cheap compared with the resources needed to produce and market an innovation. The independent inventor or designer is likely to have to rely on family and friends for financial backing, particularly in the early stages. Seed capital is sometimes available in the form of innovation grants from government bodies, such as the Department for Trade and Industry in the UK, which offers development funding to individuals
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Analysing European Romanticism
The principal tenets of the movement known as Romanticism first began in Germany and England, with the former pioneering the moral and philosophical beliefs and the latter producing the first Romantic artists and poets. This album concentrates on the development and spread of Romanticism in mainland Europe, analysing in clear, concise terms the metaphysical questions and beliefs that engendered the movement, along with the cultural and historical contexts that encouraged its development. The alb
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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

USA vs USSR: The Cold War: Crash Course World History, #39
In which John Green teaches you about the Cold War, which was occasionally hot, but on average, it was cool. In the sense of its temperature. It was by no means cool, man. After World War II, there were basically two big geopolitical powers left to divide up the world. And divide they did. The United States and the Soviet Union divvied up Europe in the aftermath of the war, and then proceeded to spend the next 45 years fighting over the rest of the world. It was the great ideological struggle, w
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Flooding, oceanic fungi, identifying old bones
This week in the Planet Earth Podcast: a look at ways to reduce the risk of urban flooding; identifying species and building biographies from tiny fragments of ancient bone; new species of fungi from the ocean.
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#390: The human cost of hate: The lasting damage caused by homophobia and transphobia

Psychiatric epidemiologist Professor Michael King discusses the devastating psychological harm suffered by victims of homophobia and transphobia. He also examines the role of families, governments and religion in curbing the problem. Presented by Lynne Haultain.

 


Author(s): up-close@unimelb.edu.au (University of Melbourne)

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#393: Antagonize your ageing: The science behind living healthier for longer

Geriatrician Professor Andrea Maier describes what happens to our cells as we age, and explains the causes of age-related diseases. She also discusses how positive lifestyle choices and preventive medical interventions can help us live healthier for longer. Presented by Dr Andi Horvath.


Author(s): up-close@unimelb.edu.au (University of Melbourne)

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17.1 Introduction

I'm going to pause here to try to put together some of the ideas we have encountered so far. I deliberately chose the example of a supermarket to illustrate some of the key processes involved in an ICT system. Figure 15 is a modified version of the block diagram for computers in a ne
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4.6 The Classification Theorem

In this subsection we state the Classification Theorem for surfaces, which classifies a surface in terms of its boundary number β, its orientability number ω and its Euler characteristic χ, each of which is a topological invariant – it is preserved under homeomorphisms.

Let us remind ourselves of these three numbers.

  • A surface may or may not have a boundary, and, if it does, then the boundary has finitely many disjoint pieces. The nu
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Introduction

Computers are designed to receive, store, manipulate and present data. This course explains how computers do this, with reference to the examples of a PC, kitchen scales and a digital camera. In particular it explores the idea that the data in a computer represents something in the real world.

This OpenLearn course provides a sample of level 2 study in Author(s): The Open University

RVC 28 - Dietary Fatty Acids and Fertility of Humans and Animals
We’re constantly told that too much fat in our diet is bad for the health of ourselves and our animals. However it now seems that very particular types of fats are implicated in determining not only animal health but their reproductive performance. Here Dr Robert Abayasekara and Prof Claire Wathes of the Department Of Veterinary Basic Sciences at the RVC explain their work demonstrating the effect of different polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) on human and animal fertility.
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8.3 Synthesis of information

The synthesis needs to show you can:

  • evaluate and synthesise information and present sources correctly;

  • identify the various arguments and present your interpretation in a way that brings together information in a coherent way;

  • prepare an oral presentation for delivery and be prepared to lead a discussion of it.

Your presentation and discussion needs to show you can:

    <
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5.3 Type 2 diabetes

Type 2 diabetes was previously called non insulin-dependent diabetes. People with Type 2 diabetes produce insulin but it may be in insufficient amounts and/or their cells are resistant to the action of insulin (Figure 7). Hyperglycaemic symptoms, such as thirst and passing large amounts of urine, may be absent. Ketoacidosis does
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4.4 Are there alternatives to medication?

Another response to bereavement has been to suggest that the bereaved person should go through some form of bereavement counselling. Cruse Bereavement Care is the largest bereavement counselling organisation in the UK.

There are contrasting opinions about the effectiveness of bereavement counselling (also called grief counselling). For many years it had been thought that there was no evidence for the effectiveness of grief counselling, and there was even an opinion that substantial numb
Author(s): The Open University

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Veterans History Project Congressional Staff Briefing
Staff of the Veterans History Project make their annual briefing to Congressional staff. Speakers included Betsy Peterson, Bob Patrick, Patrick Burns, Florence Champagne, Lloyd Lenhart and Lisa Taylor. For transcript, captions, and more information, visit http://www.loc.gov/today/cyberlc/feature_wdesc.php?rec=6324
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3.6.1 Radioactivity and bugs!

Many natural processes involve repeated doublings or halving at regular intervals. You may have come across this already in your work, in the context of bacterial growth or radioactivity. In this section, we are going to look in more detail at bacterial growth and radioactivity and we will be using graphs to examine how the numbers of bacteria or numbers of radioactive atoms change over time.


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Somali famine refugees moved to new camp
Aug. 8 - The U.N. has begun relocating refugees fleeing famine and conflict in Somalia from the unsecure outskirts of Dadaab camp into a new extension to help cope with overcrowding. Nick Rowlands reports.
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Acknowledgements

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions), this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission to reproduce materia
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Michael King Memorial Lecture 2012: Grahame Sydney – Regionalism Forever: Reflections on My Backya
Grahame Sydney is a celebrated New Zealand artist whose works focus on the landscapes of Central Otago and the Maniototo in the South Island. Sydney was the University of Otago Frances Hodgkins Fellow in 1978 and is well-known for his love of the New Zealand environment, and his efforts to protect it from over-development. Here he discusses his views on regional diversity, and the future of our countryside. 4 October 2012.
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Former clerk and Vanderbilt law professor talks about legacy of Justice Antonin Scalia
Vanderbilt Law School professor Brian Fitzpatrick, who clerked for the late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, discusses the man and how the conservative justice revolutionized a movement in the Supreme Court in terms of how cases are analyzed and debated.
Author(s): Amy Wolf

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