Academic Writing Symposium, Chapter 8
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Acknowledgements

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions), this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

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References

Anderson, M. (1993) ‘The social implications of demographic change’ in Thompson, F.M.L. (ed.) The Cambridge Social History of Britain Vol. 2, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.
Bainham, A. (1999) ‘Defining parenthood: parentage, parenthood and parental responsibility – subtle, elusive yet important distinctions’ in Bainham, A., Sclater, S.D. and Richards, M. (eds) What is a Parent? A Socio-Lega
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“These could revolutionize the world” — Pint cracks code to cheap, small carbon nanotubes
Imagine a box you plug into the wall that cleans your toxic air and pays you cash. That's essentially what Vanderbilt University researchers produced after discovering the blueprint for turning carbon dioxide into the most valuable material ever sold – carbon nanotubes with small diameters.
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3.4 Input and output considerations

CCDs are not inherently able to detect colour, only brightness. So it is necessary to rely on the fact that any colour of light can be made up from the three primary colours of light: red, blue and green. (Note that the three primary colours of light are different from the three primary colours of pigments.) Each CCD in the array is therefore overlaid with a red, blue or green filter and so detects the brightness of, respectively, the red light, the blue light or the green light falling on it
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3.1 Introduction

Surrounded by the ever-present threat of ill health, not surprisingly, people expended a good deal of time and energy on trying to stay well. The late nineteenth century saw a new emphasis on promoting health, which was defined as ‘a state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity’ (quoted in Riley, 1997, p. 199). Health was not simply a desirable end in itself. The pursuit of health was portrayed as a moral duty: parents had a
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President George Washington, Part IX
Final installment of the animated biography of the life of President George Washington. This Discovery Education video is aimed at elementary school children.
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Introduction

This unit will help you to identify and use information in Science and Nature, whether for your work, study or personal purposes. Experiment with some of the key resources in this subject area, and learn about the skills which will enable you to plan searches for information, so you can find what you are looking for more easily. Discover the meaning of information quality, and learn how to evaluate the information you come across. You will also be introduced to the many different ways of orga
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2 Explaining fertility decline from a feminist perspective

Feminist theory underpins one of the most influential historiographies of fertility decline and it allows us to foreground gender as a dominant feature in questions of heterosexuality and parenthood. This is not to suggest that divisions of class, ‘race’, (dis)ability and generation are unimportant in this historical phenomenon, and any full understanding of fertility decline would be incomplete without including them. But in this unit the main focus will be on gender and these other soci
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Acknowledgements

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions), this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

The material acknowledged below is Proprietary and used under licence (not subject to Creativ
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4.4.1 Voltage, current and resistance

Voltage (or, more correctly, electromotive force, emf – but I shall follow common practice and just say voltage) is a measure of the force with which electricity is 'pushed'. Nothing happens, however, unless there is an electric circuit, which is a path from one terminal of a voltage source (the battery, in this case) to the other, along which the electricity can flow (Author(s): The Open University

Ah Bon French School Supplies Slap


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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • understand the Enlightenment ideas that underpinned Robert Owen's social reform agenda

  • understand how Owen's background and experience at New Lanark fed through into his thinking in the essays in A New View of Society

  • understand the main proposals in the essays

  • understand New Lanark's role as a model for social reform during this period.


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Acknowledgements

The content acknowledged below is Proprietary (see terms and conditions) and is used under licence.

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission to reproduce material in this course:

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11.941 Learning by Comparison: First World/Third World Cities (MIT)
The primary purpose of this seminar is to enable students to craft approaches to so-called "First World"/ "Third World" city comparisons that are theoretically sophisticated, methodologically rigorous, contextually grounded, and significantly beneficial. Since there exists very little literature and very few projects which compare "First World" and "Third World" cities in a sophisticated and genuinely useful manner, the seminar is structured around a series of readings, case studies, and discuss
Author(s): Inam, Aseem

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Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative C

References

James, W. (1950) The Principles of Psychology, New York, Dover (first published 1890).
Johnston, M. (1987) ‘Human beings’, in Journal of Philosophy, 84, 2, 59–83.
Robinson, J. (1995) ‘Startle’, in Journal of Philosophy, 92, 53–74.
Rorty, A. (1980) ‘Introduction’ in A. Rorty (ed.) Explaining Emoti
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Activity 5

Adapting participatory methods

0 hours 45 minutes

This activity is an opportunity to reflect on how you might adapt and use the ideas introduced in Activity 4. Imagine you are running a summer holiday
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Lecture 4 [slides]: SQL, Continued
MySQL. SQL. MySQL types. Indexes, constraints. MySQL Functions. JOIN. Race conditions. INSERT ... ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE. Transactions (InnoDB). Locks (MyISAM). CSV.
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4.1 A measure of success

If what I have highlighted so far were the whole story, the only adaptive features shown would be those that equipped the rodent for times of famine, which is patently not the case. It is obviously a very important factor in the production of new species because the most productive of rodents (rats and mice) account for about 1300 of the 2000 or so rodent species, following the figures given in the TV programme. In LoM you have seen many interesting characteristics to which adaptive functions
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The Slave Ship: A Human History
This one-and-a-half hour lecture by Dr. Marcus Rediker is about the British slave trade and why it was considered essential to English prosperity. " British ships carried manufactured goods to West Africa, where they were exchanged with local rulers for slaves. Hundreds of these slaves were packed into the ships and carried to the West Indies -- the so-called "middle passage" -- where they were sold and the proceeds used to buy goods the ships then transported back to England. The use of quotes
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