1.3 Representation

Representation is a complex idea, or set of ideas, but it is extremely important in relation to studying religion. Representing religion might mean being an official delegate of a religion, or it might mean trying to explain a religion to someone unfamiliar with it. Representation in the religious context might mean the use of an image to portray a divine figure or religious ideas, or it could refer to how a religion is characterized by either insiders or outsiders. Therefore, the sorts of qu
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Twelfth Night (Shakespeare) - Directed by Kenneth Branagh
This video is long and will most likely need to be stopped over a several-day period with discussion for better comprehension. (2:35:19)
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2.61 Internal Combustion Engines (MIT)
This course studies the fundamentals of how the design and operation of internal combustion engines affect their performance, operation, fuel requirements, and environmental impact. Topics include fluid flow, thermodynamics, combustion, heat transfer and friction phenomena, and fuel properties, with reference to engine power, efficiency, and emissions. Students examine the design features and operating characteristics of different types of internal combustion engines: spark-ignition, diesel, str
Author(s): Cheng, Wai

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1.4 Cubes

To find the cube of a number, multiply three copies of it together. For example:

You can use your calculator to find cubes. 23 is ‘two cubed’ or ‘two to the power three’. Just as ‘square root’ is the opposite process to squaring,
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1.3.1 Health personnel in Thailand

In Section 2, the main concern was with producing a table of data, for others to read, that communicates clearly the important patterns or messages in the data. In this section, the focus changes slightly. Your role will be that of the reader or user of the data in a table, and you will learn about approaches that make it easier for you to extract information from a table. However, manipulating tabular data into a form that makes it clearer to others will also, very often, make it clearer to
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What Does Math College Readiness Mean
Phil Daro, Mathematics Chair for the Common Core Standards Initiative, explains what is meant by the terms "college readiness" and "rigor."  A few examples are provided. (04:45)
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Learning outcomes

By the end of this unit you should be able to:

  • begin to recognise how elite sport is funded in the UK.


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Introduction

Computers are designed to receive, store, manipulate and present data. This course explains how computers do this, with reference to the examples of a PC, kitchen scales and a digital camera. In particular it explores the idea that the data in a computer represents something in the real world.

This OpenLearn course provides a sample of level 2 study in Author(s): The Open University

1.2 The immediacy of the still photograph

Let's begin with an example that links an historical event to a photograph. Take a moment to think about the pictures you keep in your ‘mind's eye’. Now think about the Vietnam War for a few seconds. Try to recall what images you associate with that period. It may be that you are too young to recall anything about the time; you may remember it all too vividly. It really does not matter too much for this exercise. Just see what images come into your mind when you think about that time in r
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7.2.4 Using questions

Questions can be used as a means both of persuasion and of control. Repeatedly telling an individual something that they are unwilling to accept is unlikely to get them to change their mind. It is better instead to ask carefully constructed questions that will lead him or her to realise the strength of your case and the weakness of their own. Asking questions gives the questioner more control over the conversation, forcing the other side to respond. Writing down a list of appropriate question
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2 Aims

The aims of this section are for you to:

  • gain greater fluency, confidence and skill in using your calculator;

  • begin to appreciate how the calculator can be used as a tool for learning mathematics;

  • develop an effective means of working from the Calculator Book.

In order to complete this section you will need to have obtained a Texas Instruments TI-83 calculator and the book Tapping into M
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11.471 Targeting the Poor: Local Economic Development in Developing Countries (MIT)
This course treats public-sector policies, programs, and projects that attempt to increase employment through development-promoting measures in the economic realm, through support and regulation. It discusses the types of initiatives, tasks, and environments that are most conducive to equitable outcomes, and emphasizes throughout the understandings gained about why certain initiatives work and others don’t.
Author(s): Tendler, Judith,Brandt, Karin

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Driehaus Prize Laureate Michael Graves' Acceptance Speech
2012 Driehaus Prize Laureate Michael Graves, the renowned architect and designer, gives his acceptance speech at the 2012 Richard H. Driehaus Prize at the University of Notre Dame Award Ceremony on March 24, 2012, at the John B. Murphy Auditorium in Chicago. Graves is the tenth Driehaus Prize Laureate.
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Bar Graphs
Students learn that a bar graph is a visual way to display and
compare numerical data (such as the population of different southern
states). The bars of a bar graph are drawn in relation to a horizontal
axis and a vertical axis, and a bar graph can have either vertical or
horizontal bars. Students are then asked to create bar graphs using
given data, and answer questions based on given bar graphs.

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Watching the weather
This free course, Watching the weather, describes how meteorological observations are made looking upwards from the surface of the Earth, looking downwards from satellites in space and from aircraft and balloons within the atmosphere. This international network of observations is vital for scientists and forecasters and the results impact on everyones daily activities. Author(s): Creator not set

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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

Refrigerator Freezer Combos

Video link (see supported sites below). Please use the original link, not the shortcut, e.g. www.youtube.com/watch?v=abcde