Beyond Y2k: A Look at Acadia's Present and Future
The sky may not be falling, but it sure is getting closer. Where will you when the last three zeros of our millennial odometer click into place? Computer scientists tell us that Y2K will bring the world?s computer infrastructure to its knees. Maybe, maybe not. But it is interesting that Y2K is an issue at all. Speculating on the future is simultaneously a magnifying glass for examining our technologies and a looking glass for what we become through them. "The future" is nothing new. Orwell's vis
Author(s): Anders, Peter

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Qualitative contribution of a vr-system to architectural design: Why we failed?
The paper exposes the development of a Virtual-Reality system for modeling timber structures, and evaluations with students about its contribution to the architectural project.
Author(s): Alvarado, R.G., Parra Marquez, J.C. and Vildosola

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Lyndon Johnson's Inaugural Address
On January 20, 1965, Lyndon B. Johnson began his first elected term as president of the United States. In his inaugural address, Johnson calls for the nation to unite toward a common goal. (2:02)
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2.5.1 Try some yourself

Activity 27

What are the following?

  • (a) 10

  • (b) 01

  • (c) 20

  • (d) 02


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2.1.3 The comic scenes

There is no doubt though that the play keeps drawing our attention to its protagonist's weaknesses. The comic scenes in Act 1 serve to reinforce the connection between magic and appetite. In Act 1, Scene 4, Wagner tells us that Robin is so poor that ‘he would give his soul to the devil for a shoulder of mutton, though it were blood raw’ (ll. 9–11) and Robin adds: ‘Not so, good friend. By'r Lady, I had need have it well roasted, and good sauce to it, if I pay so dear’ (ll. 12–15).
Author(s): The Open University

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7.1 Introduction

Charts, graphs and tables are all very helpful ways of representing a set of data. However, they are not the only ways of passing on information about data. This section looks at how you can analyse a set of data to summarise the given information as briefly and simply as possible.

Essentially, there are two features of a set of data that enable summarising: the average and the spread. This section starts by looking at what is meant by ‘average’. If you have already studied OpenL
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1.1.1 Simple boxplots

It is a common observation that a data exploration should always begin by looking at a graphical display of the data. When looking at data sets which involve only one variable, displays such as bar charts and histograms are available. One problem with these is that they can include too much detail. Also they are not very useful for comparing two or more samples of data. A graphical display showing certain summary statistics in a visually appealing and interpretable way is introduced in this s
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chp 4 part III

chp 4 part III
chp 4 part III Chapter 4 Developmental Psychology by David Myers 8th edition

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5.1.1 Do you dread deadlines?

Of course, there are lots of different patterns of working: some students can only work to deadlines at the very last minute; while others prefer to work in shorter snatches over longer periods. The main problem with the former is that you may have to skip over some of the points we are now discussing, which could be counter-productive.

Waiting until the last minute may be because you are afraid to begin. If this applies to you – as it will to many others – you might find it helpful
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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • develop an appreciation of the huge variety of different mammals that exist on Earth today

  • see how fossil evidence can help us to understand evolutionary history

  • understand how the structure of DNA can help us to detect differences between different species

  • apply the techniques of DNA analysis to work out which mammals are most closely related to each other

  • appreciate t
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4.4 Groups

If we agree that the posing of individuals carried messages for the viewer it makes sense that the posing of family groups can similarly be made to convey suggestions about the family and its character.


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6.2.2 The Earth's motion relative to the 3 K radiation

Radiation has energy and momentum, so we can use the molecules of a fluid such as air as an analogy for the photons of radiation. A detector pointing forwards along the direction of our motion (if any) will encounter a greater number of photons than a detector pointing backwards; in other words, it will record a higher intensity of 3 K radiation. (If the detector is tuned to a narrow band of frequencies one would also have to take account of the change in observed spectrum, but the principle
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5 Obtaining descriptive statistics

Activity 4

0 hours 20 minutes

This activity demonstrates how a simple dataset can be used to produce some basic statistics. You will see how the data from a simple experiment can be described in a
Author(s): The Open University

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Radio Lingua Network News: 26 September 2008
Happy European Day of Languages to all our listeners! By way of joining in this international celebration of languages and language-learning we're delighted to introduce eight new podcasts today. We're adding Catalan, Danish, French, Japanese, Mandarin and Romanian to our One Minute Languages series; we're introducing our first podcast for English learners - Write Back Soon will help learners master Phrasal Verbs; and we're finally announcing the long-awaited sequel to Coffee Break Spanish: it's
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8.3.2 Identify the outcomes you hope to achieve

An outcome is the result or consequence of a process. For example, you may want contribute effectively to a design project in a course, or work in a team to improve a product or system. In this case the design or product improvement is an outcome, and using your problem-solving skills is part of the process by which you achieve that outcome. You may find it useful to discuss or negotiate the outcomes you hope to achieve with others. Solving problems will often depend to some extent on other k
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Pelvis (Part 1) Tutorial
Video uses hand drawn diagrams to identify and discuss the structure and physiology of the pelvis. Focus on the pelvic girdle and joints. Good review for a test. Music in background is a little distracting, and video is a little blurry. Grades 9-12. 4:25 min.
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LCS Litigation Panel
Professional litigators discuss the types of things they do in their daily work. Panelists represent both public and private sectors.
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6.3 How a gamma camera works

Activity 13

Before we look at a patient being imaged and some of the images which can be obtained using this technique, we will look in a bit more detail at how a gamma camera works. Watch the following video clip and note
Author(s): The Open University

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Amusing introduction to beryllium
This introduction to the element beryllium (atomic number 4) covers its main uses and properties.  It is very toxic, invisible to x-rays, expensive, and used in some high-tech equipment.  Those working with beryllium are advised not to lick their fingers.  Combines amusing demonstrations with talking to the camera by a wild-haired chemistry professor.  Part of a series called Author(s): No creator set