TALAT Lecture 2302: Design of Joints
This lecture provides a view of types of joints in aluminium structures and how to design and calculate frequently used joints. Basic structural mechanics and knowledge of design philosophy, structural aluminium alloys and product forms is assumed.
Author(s): TALAT,Torsten Höglund, KTH Royal Institute of Tec

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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • develop an appreciation of the huge variety of different mammals that exist on Earth today

  • see how fossil evidence can help us to understand evolutionary history

  • understand how the structure of DNA can help us to detect differences between different species

  • apply the techniques of DNA analysis to work out which mammals are most closely related to each other

  • appreciate t
    Author(s): The Open University

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4.4 Groups

If we agree that the posing of individuals carried messages for the viewer it makes sense that the posing of family groups can similarly be made to convey suggestions about the family and its character.


Author(s): The Open University

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6.2.2 The Earth's motion relative to the 3 K radiation

Radiation has energy and momentum, so we can use the molecules of a fluid such as air as an analogy for the photons of radiation. A detector pointing forwards along the direction of our motion (if any) will encounter a greater number of photons than a detector pointing backwards; in other words, it will record a higher intensity of 3 K radiation. (If the detector is tuned to a narrow band of frequencies one would also have to take account of the change in observed spectrum, but the principle
Author(s): The Open University

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5 Obtaining descriptive statistics

Activity 4

0 hours 20 minutes

This activity demonstrates how a simple dataset can be used to produce some basic statistics. You will see how the data from a simple experiment can be described in a
Author(s): The Open University

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Pelvis (Part 1) Tutorial
Video uses hand drawn diagrams to identify and discuss the structure and physiology of the pelvis. Focus on the pelvic girdle and joints. Good review for a test. Music in background is a little distracting, and video is a little blurry. Grades 9-12. 4:25 min.
Author(s): No creator set

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6.3 How a gamma camera works

Activity 13

Before we look at a patient being imaged and some of the images which can be obtained using this technique, we will look in a bit more detail at how a gamma camera works. Watch the following video clip and note
Author(s): The Open University

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Amusing introduction to beryllium
This introduction to the element beryllium (atomic number 4) covers its main uses and properties.  It is very toxic, invisible to x-rays, expensive, and used in some high-tech equipment.  Those working with beryllium are advised not to lick their fingers.  Combines amusing demonstrations with talking to the camera by a wild-haired chemistry professor.  Part of a series called Author(s): No creator set

Virtual Maths, Cuboid - Excavation quiz1
Interactive simulaton explaining how to calculate cubic capacity of a truck for carrying excavated materials
Author(s): Leeds Metropolitan University

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2.6 Context and language variation

As well as contributing to meaning, context can also influence the actual words and sentences that we use. Do you sometimes say ‘Hi’ and at other times say ‘Good morning’? Do you have a ‘telephone voice’? This variation in language may be done deliberately, but often it is not. There are two main reasons as to why we adjust the way we speak:

  • to fit in with our audience or what we feel they expect of us; you may use ‘professional’ langu
    Author(s): The Open University

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1.11 Addition and subtraction in practice - fluid balance

A common healthcare example that uses addition and subtraction involves calculating the fluid balance of a patient.

Fluid balance is a simple but very useful way to estimate whether a patient is either becoming dehydrated or overfilled with liquids. It is calculated, on a daily basis, by adding up the total volume of liquid that has gone into their body (drinks, oral liquid medicines, intravenous drips, transfusions), then adding up the total volume of liquid that has come out of their
Author(s): The Open University

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Virtual Maths - Numbers, Geometry 2D shapes
Images of 2D shapes with formula for calculating area square, rectangle, triangle, trapezoid, parallelogram, pythagorean theorem, circle, circular sector, circular ring
Author(s): Leeds Metropolitan University

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Lecture 27 - 11/24/2010
Lecture 27
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6.3 What is the main requirement for regional government? Is it a shared identity?

If we compare the UK with other Western democracies such as Spain, Italy or Germany – all endowed with decentralised structures allowing various degrees of political autonomy for their regions – we discover that strong regional identity, as in Catalonia, the Veneto and Bavaria, is always a very important feature. However, some newly created regions such as La Rioja and Madrid in Spain also exercise devolved powers. What unites them is a common interest; the belief that regional government
Author(s): The Open University

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Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

3.3.5 Third reading

This is the final vote on the Bill. It is almost a formality since a Bill which has passed through all the stages above is unlikely to fail at this late stage. In fact, in the House of Commons there will only be a further debate on the Bill if at least six MPs request it. In the House of Lords amendments may sometimes be made at this stage.


Author(s): The Open University

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8.3 Shortage of minerals

You may be familiar with salt licks that are provided for domesticated cattle. In the wild, grass is also often low in minerals (e.g. it has almost no sodium and very little calcium), so grazers may have to go to extraordinary lengths to supplement their diet with additional minerals obtained from the most unlikely places. LoM gives some examples, but the most impressive activity takes place in the caves of Mount Elgon in Kenya [pp. 113-114]. You'll probably recall this spectacular footage fr
Author(s): The Open University

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Polish astronomers seek planets with two suns
Sept. 12 - A team of scientists from the Polish Academy of Sciences in Torun are using four remotely controlled telescopes placed around the globe to search for circumbinary systems - multiple transiting planets orbiting two suns. They hope to emulate NASA's Kepler mission, which located such a system last month. Jim Drury reports.
Author(s): No creator set

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Introduction

This unit explores school geography, focusing upon how geography is currently being taught and understood. While studying this unit you will read about the significance of geography as a subject, considering what are the defining concepts for school geography and its educational value. The unit also includes a lesson plan and a look at definitions of geography as a medium of education.


Author(s): The Open University

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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • understand the process of political devolution in the UK;

  • relate this process to both historical developments and to the wider context of contemporary events in Europe;

  • practise the skill of reading, summarising and evaluating academic arguments;

  • engage more actively as a citizen in relevant political debates (especially if you are a citizen of Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland!).
    Author(s): The Open University

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