6.2.3 Groups

The large group portrait came to commercial prominence in the 1880s, probably as a result of the widespread introduction of dry plate negatives. These negatives could be bought ready made over the counter. They did not require immediate processing and they reduced exposure times significantly. The group portrait involved the production of a single negative and a potential sale to each member of the group. Customer costs were kept low without injury to the photographer's profits. School, work
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Activity answers

Study Note: As outlined in the text I have not provided answers to all Activities. This is for two reasons:

  1. For some activities only you can devise the answer and any I gave would be distracting or unhelpful.

  2. For others in-text answers are given.


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5.2.4 Risk treatment

The risk treatment task is again carried out at unit level, in light of polices set out in Stages 1 to 3. The risks treated are those chosen for control at Stage 6.

  • Stage 7: select control objectives and controls For each risk chosen for control at Stage 6, a suitable control (countermeasure) must be selected from those suggested in the Standard or from elsewhere. The risks are treated in order of priority, according to the priority levels ass
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Eisenhower's Presidency-Domestic Concerns
This video is accompanied by text. "After the war-ravaged times of the 1940s and early 1950s, Americans turned their attention to domestic concerns. President Eisenhower's strong yet pleasant demeanor was the antithesis of Truman's cold scowl and helped usher in a more friendly and family-oriented era. While the Republican accepted much of the previous administration's New Deal, he also promoted policies that nurtured the growing economy. The philosophy of the Eisenhower administration—labeled
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5.10 Fluoridation

The addition of fluoride to water has caused much controversy and public debate. The problem seems to be that some see it as the addition of a poison, and others see it as the use of mass medication whether the individual wishes it or not.

Many waters do, however, have a natural fluoride content (Figure 33) and it has been suggested that the presence of fluoride in a concentration of 1.0 mg l−1 is beneficial in preventing dental decay. Above this concentration there is the
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6.1 What is a pie chart?

A pie chart is a circular chart (pie-shaped); it is split into segments to show percentages or the relative contributions of categories of data.

6.1.1 When are pie charts used?

A pie chart gives an immediate visual idea of the relative sizes of the shares of a whole. It is a good method of representation if you wish to compare a part of a group with the whole group. You could us
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4.1.1 Space problems

Probably the best known of these is the fact that the internet is running out of space for identifying computers. Each computer in a network needs to be identified by a unique data pattern known as an IP address. The current technology used to transport data around the internet is such that in the comparatively near future we shall run out of space to hold these unique addresses. Happily this is a problem that has been identified and groups of researchers around the globe have developed new t
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Water in Ethiopia
In Ethiopia, 65% of people don’t have access to clean drinking water. In this album we take a glimpse at the struggles Ethiopians go through each day, just to survive. We look closely at the different methods used to improve the quality of life in the rural highlands as well as the conflict between neighbouring farming villages attempting to share the same water supply. This material forms part of the course U116 Environment: journeys through a changing world.Author(s): The iTunes U team

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Vanderbilt Poll: Tennessee Senate race a toss-up; Lee in lead for governor
New horse-race poll: Tennessee Senate candidate Marsha Blackburn (R) is virtually tied with Phil Bredesen (D) at 43-44, while gubernatorial candidate Bill Lee (R) leads Democrat Karl Dean (D) 48-37.
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Rights not set

Is Wikipedia a Credible Source?
It's the go-to website for information on just about anything. But is the info on Wikipedia worth it's weight in megabytes? Trace has the answer and tells us about a new plan to up the accuracy of some of its most popular pages. (03:19)

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2.2 Two factors affecting the distribution of organisms

We will illustrate some of the complexities of interpreting ecological field data by looking at two sets of environmental factors, soil pH and salinity, desiccation and biotic interactions on sea-shores.


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4.2 Earthquake magnitude

The magnitude of an earthquake is a measure of the amount of seismic energy released by it, so it is a quantitative scale. The scale of earthquake magnitude is called the Richter scale. Its development is described in Box 4, Charles Richter and the Richter earthquake magnitude scale. The Richter magnitude is calculated by first measuring the size of the largest ground motion recorded by a seismometer, a sensitive instrument that detects the ground movements
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1.1 What happens during an earthquake?

The Earth is an active planet, with activity occurring in the oceans, in the atmosphere and in the solid Earth itself. This course looks at a dramatic example of solid Earth activity: earthquakes.

You probably have some idea from newspapers, television or perhaps personal experience, of just how powerful earthquakes can be. In a matter of minutes earthquakes have devastated cities and killed a quarter of a million people. I was in only a medium-sized earthquake in 1978, but even that ha
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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • understand the historical growth of the idea of human rights

  • demonstrate an awareness of the international context of human rights

  • demonstrate an awareness of the position of human rights in the UK prior to 1998

  • understand the importance of the Human Rights Act 1998

  • analyse and evaluate concepts and ideas.


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5.1 EU law

The main sources of EU law are:

  • EU primary legislation, represented by the treaties

  • EU secondary legislation, in the form of regulations, directives, decisions, recommendations and opinions

  • rulings on cases brought before the European Court of Justice.

EU law is created by the legislative powers with which the EU member states have invested the EU institutions. The law created by EU institutions is also bin
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4.7 Summary of Part C

Here you have learned about the rule-making mechanisms which characterise the EU and its main constitutive institutions: the European Council, the European Commission, the Council of the European Union, the European Parliament and the European Court of Justice. These institutions complement each other in their legislative functions in order to deliver a body of Community law that applies uniformly and consistently in all the member states.


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Working mathematically
This free course, Working mathematically, is aimed at teachers who wish to review how they go about the practice of teaching mathematics, those who are considering becoming mathematics teachers, or those who are studying mathematics courses and would like to understand more about the teaching and learning process. First published
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