Academic Writing Symposium, Chapter 8
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Conclusion

This free course provided an introduction to studying Environment & Development. It took you through a series of exercises designed to develop your approach to study and learning at a distance, and helped to improve your confidence as an independent learner.


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The Ten Commandments

This video sings the Ten Commandments. The words are printed on the screen and sung.  The song is sung twice so students can sing the second time through.  There are no pictures in this video.  Poor to average quality video, song is catchy and it is nice to have the words on the screen, but could use pictures.


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Acknowledgements

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions), this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

The material acknowledged below is Proprietary and used under licence (not subject to Creativ
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Keep on learning

Study another free course

There are more than 800 courses on OpenLearn for you to choose from
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3.2 What are rights?

The modern discourse of universal human rights has a number of features. The idea that everyone, everywhere has rights refers to the concept that there are certain entitlements justifiably owed to all individuals by virtue of certain features that all human beings have in common. As the nineteenth-century French politician and historian Alexis de Tocqueville put it, the idea of rights ‘removes from any request its supplicant character, and places the one who claims it on the same level as t
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Ocean Currents
We hear about strange things from distant places that get washed up on our shores all the time.  But how did they get there? Learn more about ocean currents. (01:20)
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References

Anderson, M. (1993) ‘The social implications of demographic change’ in Thompson, F.M.L. (ed.) The Cambridge Social History of Britain Vol. 2, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.
Bainham, A. (1999) ‘Defining parenthood: parentage, parenthood and parental responsibility – subtle, elusive yet important distinctions’ in Bainham, A., Sclater, S.D. and Richards, M. (eds) What is a Parent? A Socio-Lega
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The Pattern That Connects
While patterns have a spotty history in architecture, their definitions and uses in other fields offer new possibilities for design. This paper examines those definitions and uses?including theories put forward by architectural theorist, Christopher Alexander; art educator, Gyorgy Kepes; chemist, Ilya Prigogine; and anthropologist, Gregory Bateson. Of particular interest is the shift from eternal, essential, universal, and fundamental patterns to fleeting, superficial, specific, and incidental v
Author(s): Andersen, Paul; Salomon, David

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5.10 Vibrating air column: end effects

In the previous two sections on standing waves in cylindrical tubes, we assumed that at an open end there must be a pressure node. In fact, the pressure node (and the corresponding displacement antinode) actually lies a small distance outside the tube. The effect is that the air column behaves as though it were a little longer than it really is by an amount called the end correction. Because of this end correction, the resonance frequencies will be a little lower than originally expect
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3.1 Introduction

Surrounded by the ever-present threat of ill health, not surprisingly, people expended a good deal of time and energy on trying to stay well. The late nineteenth century saw a new emphasis on promoting health, which was defined as ‘a state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity’ (quoted in Riley, 1997, p. 199). Health was not simply a desirable end in itself. The pursuit of health was portrayed as a moral duty: parents had a
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3 Key skills assessment courses

This section gives advice and guidance to help you compile and present a portfolio of selected work. You are strongly advised to read through this section so that you have an idea of what is expected.

The key skills assessment courses provide an opportunity for you to integrate your development of key skills with your work or study. You may choose to concentrate on skills that you need to develop and improve for your job, for a new course, or personally to help you keep abreast of new d
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Introduction

This unit will help you to identify and use information in Science and Nature, whether for your work, study or personal purposes. Experiment with some of the key resources in this subject area, and learn about the skills which will enable you to plan searches for information, so you can find what you are looking for more easily. Discover the meaning of information quality, and learn how to evaluate the information you come across. You will also be introduced to the many different ways of orga
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2 Explaining fertility decline from a feminist perspective

Feminist theory underpins one of the most influential historiographies of fertility decline and it allows us to foreground gender as a dominant feature in questions of heterosexuality and parenthood. This is not to suggest that divisions of class, ‘race’, (dis)ability and generation are unimportant in this historical phenomenon, and any full understanding of fertility decline would be incomplete without including them. But in this unit the main focus will be on gender and these other soci
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Acknowledgements

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions), this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • understand the Enlightenment ideas that underpinned Robert Owen's social reform agenda

  • understand how Owen's background and experience at New Lanark fed through into his thinking in the essays in A New View of Society

  • understand the main proposals in the essays

  • understand New Lanark's role as a model for social reform during this period.


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2012 March 8 - Part 1

Prof. Adams briefly reviews the processes of asymptotic and series analysis to derive the energy eigenstates of the quantum harmonic oscillator, and then begins to discuss the operator method.


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3.3.5 Third reading

This is the final vote on the Bill. It is almost a formality since a Bill which has passed through all the stages above is unlikely to fail at this late stage. In fact, in the House of Commons there will only be a further debate on the Bill if at least six MPs request it. In the House of Lords amendments may sometimes be made at this stage.


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11.941 Learning by Comparison: First World/Third World Cities (MIT)
The primary purpose of this seminar is to enable students to craft approaches to so-called "First World"/ "Third World" city comparisons that are theoretically sophisticated, methodologically rigorous, contextually grounded, and significantly beneficial. Since there exists very little literature and very few projects which compare "First World" and "Third World" cities in a sophisticated and genuinely useful manner, the seminar is structured around a series of readings, case studies, and discuss
Author(s): Inam, Aseem

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Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative C

2.2 Recent governance failures

As we have discussed before, the creation of corporate regulation is often linked to perceived failures of corporations and their management to behave in the way society expect them to. Corporate governance is not an exception to this trend, and, as with accounting, different countries may well experience difficulties at different times. For example, the development of British codes of best practice, which began with the Cadbury Committee, can be related to governance scandals such as Polly P
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