Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • develop an appreciation of the huge variety of different mammals that exist on Earth today

  • see how fossil evidence can help us to understand evolutionary history

  • understand how the structure of DNA can help us to detect differences between different species

  • apply the techniques of DNA analysis to work out which mammals are most closely related to each other

  • appreciate t
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5.2.2 Owning problems

Problem ownership is a tricky issue. It's also an issue that good leaders get right instinctively, and poor leaders get wrong consistently. The point is that there are two distinct classes of problems faced by leaders. The first consists of problems which are owned by the group members. Examples include when some additional resources are required, when instructions are not understood or when members complain that something is wrong. Under these conditions the leader's function is to provide p
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2 - La prohibition des drogues et de l’alcool en pays chrétien et musulman : approche ...

La prohibition des drogues et de l’alcool en pays chrétien et musulman : approche historique

...
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3.4 Moon36: Apollo 12 station 2

Pete Conrad took this pan early in EVA-1 from a position due west of the Lunar Module. Al Bean can be seen in several frames taking documentation photos of the Solar Wind Collector (SWC) that he has just deployed. (QuickTime, 500KB, note: this may take some time to download depending on your connection speed)

2.3 Threats to the living planet

An idea, a relationship, can go extinct, just like an animal or plant. The idea in this case is 'nature', the separate and wild province, the world apart from man to which he adapted, under whose rules he was born and died. In the pas
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5.10 Bridge stability

Any fracture of the diagonal wind brace tie bars could allow substantial lateral movement at the top of the piers. If these tie bars had already been injured by the previous train to cross the bridge, it would have only taken a little extra effort to complete the process as the mail train arrived over each pier supporting the high girders. Once the wind braces had failed completely, and the struts fractured at their connections each pier would behave as two separate supporting structures.


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References

Anderson, R.G.W. (1986) ‘Joseph Black’, in D. Daiches et al. (eds), A Hotbed of Genius, Edinburgh University Press.
Barfoot, M. (1990) ‘Hume and the culture of science’, in M.A. Stewart (ed.), Studies in the Philosophy of the Scottish Enlightenment, Oxford University Press.
Black, J. (1803) Lectures on the Elements of Chemistry, John Robison (ed.),
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Close Reading For Understanding Workshop 15
Fifth-grade teacher Dana Robertson models strategic reading, and teaches his students the strategies readers use to comprehend the text. He then continues with small group instruction while other students work independently.
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LCS Litigation Panel
Professional litigators discuss the types of things they do in their daily work. Panelists represent both public and private sectors.
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1.4.1 Try some yourself

Activity 8

If a litre is one cubic decimetre, how many litres are there in a cubic metre?

Answer

Since a litre is one cubic decimeter, the questi
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11.5.5 Chance

Another important source of inventions and scientific discoveries is chance, which is strongly associated with acts of insight. As well as the sort of painstaking work that either precedes an invention or goes into the steady improvement in performance, in the development of most inventions there's a moment when chance plays a part. Often people are looking for one thing but find another – perhaps working on one technology when they stumble on the principles behind another. The skill of the
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9.3.1 Weber's Law

Pioneering work on the relationship between ΔI and S was done by the German physiologist, Ernst Weber in the 1830s. Weber found that the increment in stimulation required for a JND was proportional to the size of the stimulus. Weber had subjects lift a small ‘standard’ weight (S) and then lift a slightly heavier ‘comparison’ (T) weight and judge which was heavier. He found that when the difference between the standard and comparison weights was small, the subjects found
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It's Time We Met: A Tokyo Teenager Visits the Museum
00:04:28
© 2000–2017 The Metropolitan Museum of Art. All rights reserved.

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2.5 ‘Difference’ and identity

If differences on the basis of gender, ethnicity and disability are socially constructed, how should people view their identities, for example as men, or disabled people, or people of African–Caribbean origin? Where do such identities come from, and how useful are they in explaining people's experience of communication in care services?

Foucault’s ideas about changing discourses, and the ways in which they construct people's view of the world, can be applied to issues of ethnicity a
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2.7 Inferring relationships of common ancestry

Activity 6

0 hours 10 minutes

This clip addresses the question of how one might go about building a tree, or inferring relationships of common ancestry, by recognising evolutionary no
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17.3 Choosing appropriate materials and manufacturing process

The choice of materials and manufacturing process for a particular new product is an important aspect of the innovation process. It is not necessarily the case that the materials chosen for the early prototypes of an invention are those best suited for the larger-scale manufacture of the innovation. Choice of materials can affect the performance, quality and economic manufacture of most new products, so it's important to choose wisely.

While inventors and designers usually need to seek
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Teaching Skip Counting by 2
Teach kids kindergarten math, skip counting by 2, by using the old cheer leading chant: 2, 4, 6, 8 who do we appreciate? Helps students count even numbers. (02:04)

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Introduction

From the moment that Galileo dropped two cannonballs of different sizes and weights from the top of the Leaning Tower of Pisa mankind has been fascinated by the impact of gravity. This unit looks at gravity, its impact on objects and how the energy involved in the movement of objects is dispersed or stored.

This unit is from our archive and is an adapted extract from How the universe works (S197) which is no longer taught by The Open University. If you want to study formally with us, yo
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Introduction

We have seen that where precipitation reaches the ground, some runs off the surface into streams and rivers and some of it infiltrates, passing through the soil. Water that reaches the water table to become groundwater may eventually re-emerge at the surface as springs where the water table intersects the surface. Almost all streams and rivers have springs or seepages as their ultimate source, or are fed by them at various points along their courses.

This unit is from our archive and is
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"The Road Not Taken" Poem by Robert Frost
Here is a black and white virtual movie of the head (photograph) of Robert Frost "reading" probably his best known poem, "The Road Not Taken."
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