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2.2.2 Hollow tubing surfaces

In their doughnut-shaped representation, toruses can be thought of as being hollow tubes. Many other surfaces in space can also be drawn as if they were made of hollow tubing. Figure 15 shows two such examples.

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2.6 Going back

Capturing bits of reality and transferring them to a computer would be a pointless exercise if they stayed locked in the digital world. We want access to what we've captured. We want to see the results. In particular, we may want to look at our captive in a different form. For instance, suppose we input the series of temperature readings shown in Author(s): The Open University

4.1.1 Space problems

Probably the best known of these is the fact that the internet is running out of space for identifying computers. Each computer in a network needs to be identified by a unique data pattern known as an IP address. The current technology used to transport data around the internet is such that in the comparatively near future we shall run out of space to hold these unique addresses. Happily this is a problem that has been identified and groups of researchers around the globe have developed new t
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5.5.3 Plotters

A plotter is a special type of printing device mostly used by architects, engineers and map makers. Here the printed output is produced by moving a pen across the paper. Sometimes several differently coloured pens are available. Plotters are obviously most suitable for line drawings, which is why architects, for instance, use them. I've mentioned them here, however, because – in contrast with monitors and printers – they produce an analogue output directly.


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1.4 Number lines

It is often useful in mathematics to think of numbers stretched out along the imaginary number line. The diagram below shows part of the number line.

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