Water in Ethiopia
In Ethiopia, 65% of people don’t have access to clean drinking water. In this album we take a glimpse at the struggles Ethiopians go through each day, just to survive. We look closely at the different methods used to improve the quality of life in the rural highlands as well as the conflict between neighbouring farming villages attempting to share the same water supply. This material forms part of the course U116 Environment: journeys through a changing world.Author(s): The iTunes U team

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

Is Wikipedia a Credible Source?
It's the go-to website for information on just about anything. But is the info on Wikipedia worth it's weight in megabytes? Trace has the answer and tells us about a new plan to up the accuracy of some of its most popular pages. (03:19)

Author(s): No creator set

License information
Related content

2.2 Two factors affecting the distribution of organisms

We will illustrate some of the complexities of interpreting ecological field data by looking at two sets of environmental factors, soil pH and salinity, desiccation and biotic interactions on sea-shores.


Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

4.2 Earthquake magnitude

The magnitude of an earthquake is a measure of the amount of seismic energy released by it, so it is a quantitative scale. The scale of earthquake magnitude is called the Richter scale. Its development is described in Box 4, Charles Richter and the Richter earthquake magnitude scale. The Richter magnitude is calc
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

1.1 What happens during an earthquake?

The Earth is an active planet, with activity occurring in the oceans, in the atmosphere and in the solid Earth itself. This course looks at a dramatic example of solid Earth activity: earthquakes.

You probably have some idea from newspapers, television or perhaps personal experience, of just how powerful earthquakes can be. In a matter of minutes earthquakes have devastated cities and killed a quarter of a million people. I was in only a medium-sized earthquake in 1978, but even that ha
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • understand the historical growth of the idea of human rights

  • demonstrate an awareness of the international context of human rights

  • demonstrate an awareness of the position of human rights in the UK prior to 1998

  • understand the importance of the Human Rights Act 1998

  • analyse and evaluate concepts and ideas.


Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

5.1 EU law

The main sources of EU law are:

  • EU primary legislation, represented by the treaties

  • EU secondary legislation, in the form of regulations, directives, decisions, recommendations and opinions

  • rulings on cases brought before the European Court of Justice.

EU law is created by the legislative powers with which the EU member states have invested the EU institutions. The law created by EU institutions is also bin
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

4.7 Summary of Part C

Here you have learned about the rule-making mechanisms which characterise the EU and its main constitutive institutions: the European Council, the European Commission, the Council of the European Union, the European Parliament and the European Court of Justice. These institutions complement each other in their legislative functions in order to deliver a body of Community law that applies uniformly and consistently in all the member states.


Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

Working mathematically
This free course, Working mathematically, is aimed at teachers who wish to review how they go about the practice of teaching mathematics, those who are considering becoming mathematics teachers, or those who are studying mathematics courses and would like to understand more about the teaching and learning process. First published
Author(s): Creator not set

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

Introduction

The topics in this free course, Ratio, proportion and percentages, are concerned with dividing something into parts. For example, if there are 200 people living in a small village, and 50 of these are children, this could be expressed as a percentage:

 25% of the village population are children;

or as a ratio:

  one in every four people is a child or there is 1 child for every three adults;

or a proportion:

  the proportion of children in the v
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

Introduction to the calculus of variations
This free course concerns the calculus of variations. Section 1 introduces some key ingredients by solving a seemingly simple problem – finding the shortest distance between two points in a plane. The section also introduces the notions of a functional and of a stationary path. Section 2 describes basic problems that can be formulated in terms of functionals. Section 3 looks at partial and total derivatives. Section 4 contains a derivation of the Euler-Lagrange equation. In Section 5 the Euler
Author(s): Creator not set

License information
Related content

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

1.1 Understanding scale diagrams

Plans of houses and instructions for assembling shelves, etc., often come in the form of scale diagrams. Each length on the diagram represents a length relating to the real house, the real shelves, etc. Often a scale is given on the diagram so that you can see which length on the diagram represents a standard length, such as a metre, on the real object. This length always represents the same standard length, wherever it is on the diagram and in whatever direction.


Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

2.5 Cirrhosis and alcoholism

The data in Table 5, which are given for several countries in Europe and elsewhere, are the average annual alcohol consumption in litres per person and the death rate per 100 000 of the population from cirrhosis and alcoholism. It would seem obvious that the two are related to each o
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

2.4 Self-assessment questions and problems

Self-assessment questions are intended to test your immediate comprehension of a reading section. If you have difficulty with them you should read again the appropriate parts of the material. Before checking the solution to any part of a question, you should work through all the parts of that question.

Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

3.4.1 Try some yourself

Activity 24

A new train operator boasts ‘Train times reduced by 12%’. Decrease 90 minutes by 12%. Give your answer as minutes and seconds.

Answer
Author(s): The Open University

License information
Related content

Copyright © 2016 The Open University

1.5 Speeds

Speed is the ratio of distance travelled to time taken. A runner's speed may be quoted in metres per second, miles per hour or kilometres per hour. The units are given as:

   unit of distance per unit of time.

When you have a distance covered (such as a mile) and a time taken (such as four minutes) the average speed is defined as