3.1.3 How do I design a table?

If you're a student, you are likely to present data in a table after you have carried out an investigation, particularly when you are writing up the report. Some courses include a small-scale project and this is likely to be the point at which knowledge of how to design a table will be useful. The following steps form a reliable guide.

  1. Collect the data.

    In the case of a project, you are likely to collect the data yourself, possibly from other w
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3.1.1 When are tables used?

Within your course, tables are likely to be used as a particular structured format to summarise numerical information. They tend to be used to present data as a summary and as a starting point for discussion. But someone always prepares tables. So always be aware of where the table that you are looking at has come from. Could the source be trying to tell you something in particular? For example, if a table were summarising the costs of running a hospital, would you expect figures from the gov
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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • reflect on the reasons for needing to improve skills in using charts, graphs and tables

  • understand the following mathematical concepts and how to use them, through instruction, worked examples and practice activities: reflecting on mathematics; tables; line graphs; bar charts and histograms; pie charts; analysis

  • draw on a technical glossary, plus a a list of references to further reading and sources
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4.1 Reading data from tables

Tables are used as a way of describing what you are talking about in a structured format. They tend to be used to present figures, either as a summary or as a starting point for discussion. Tables are also probably the most common way of presenting data in educational courses.

Tables have always been compiled by someone. In doing so, the compiler may have selected data and they will have chosen a particular format, either of which may influence the reader. You need to be aware of the co
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1 Your worries and concerns with charts, graphs and tables

Do you sometimes feel that you do not fully understand the way that numbers are presented in course materials, newspaper articles and other published material?

What do you consider are your main worries and concerns about your ability to understand and interpret graphs, charts and tables?

Spend a few minutes writing these down before you read on.

One student has said:

I am never quite sure that I
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Acknowledgements

The content acknowledged below is Proprietary (see terms and conditions) and is used under licence.

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission to reproduce material in this booklet.

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Identity In Question
This album Investigates recent debates in sociology, cultural theory and psychoanalysis, and explores the nature of social identity, ‘socialisation’, subjectivity and personhood. The case studies explore the value and relevance of different theoretical frameworks for understanding identity by applying the main concepts in real situations. The material is taken from The Open University course D853 Identity in question.Author(s): The OpenLearn team

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4 Copyright and OER

I assume that you are reading this course because you would like to create a course similar to the materials that you can find on the OpenLearn website. You therefore have a teaching purpose and are particularly interested in the use of online tuition. Hopefully you are also keen to share your teaching materials with others. But why bother creating a new OER? Surely there is so much material already available for free on the web anyway!

I would answer this in a number of ways. First: qu
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Business English: Making decisions
Do you want to relocate to the UK? This free course, Business English: Making decisions, will help you with the language difficulties that can arise while providing assistance with the practicalities of the decision-making processes involved and the consultation that is necessary to ensure employees are kept informed. First published on Tue, 23 Oct 2018 a
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1.1 Introduction

Historically, one of the most significant changes over the past hundred years has been the move away from large families living and remaining in one community to smaller family units that are required, through the economic necessity of employment opportunities, to be as mobile as possible. Extended family networks are often weaker: in many instances parents are unable to call on the support of children's grandparents, aunts and uncles, and for some people parenting can be a very isolating and
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Introduction

In the changing world of family life, parenting itself has come under closer examination. How important is quality parenting, who judges it, and is its provision the sole responsibility of parents – should parents just be left to get on with it? This course explores what parenting actually means, what is meant by quality parenting, how it can be enhanced and promoted, and how services intended to promote quality parenting can be strengthened.

While working through this course, you wil
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1.9 Conclusion

In this course you have seen the importance of the shared meanings that we construct together – how they enable us to act collectively within social situations. In particular, you have explored Goffman’s ideas about how those meanings are constructed through:

  • the way we present ourselves within social situations

  • the way we respond to other people’s presentation of themselves and help to shore up their performances.


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1.6.1 Working in ambiguous situations

So far the focus has been on discussing scenes played out in the highly structured settings of hospitals and doctors’ surgeries. However, a lot of care takes place in settings where structures are much less clear – where the meaning of a scene can be highly ambiguous, and where any working consensus between participants is fragile.

When a social worker goes into a family home, for example, the members of the household may not agree at all with the social worker’s definition
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References

Anderson, I., Kemp, P. and Quilgars, D. (1993) Single Homeless People, London, HMSO.
Fitzpatrick, S. and Clapham, D. (1999) 'Homelessness and young people' in Huston, S. and Clapham, D. (eds), Homelessness: Public policies and private troubles, London, Cassell, pp. 173–90.

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Conclusion

This free course provided an introduction to studying Health and Social Care. It took you through a series of exercises designed to develop your approach to study and learning at a distance and helped to improve your confidence as an independent learner.


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2.1 Introduction

Western society is increasingly preoccupied with concerns about risk, so much so that some sociologists now define it as ‘risk society’ (Beck, 1992). It is argued that people in general are experiencing heightened levels of anxiety in response to rapid technological and social change. News stories in the media are filled with warnings and dire predictions for the future. This is particularly true when the potential consequences appear to be both catastrophic and difficult to predict, such
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1.2.3 Boundaries of ‘normality’

The origin of the ‘other’ in society is the widespread human tendency to create categories where people who don't fit in can be placed away from the mainstream. Social categories may lead to prejudice and discrimination, but may also lead to the physical separation of people to the margins of that society. Sibley (1995) traces the physical marginalisation of people in what he calls the ‘geographies of exclusion’. Part of the process of exclusion is where the ‘bad’, the ‘mad’ a
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1.6 Valuing diversity

Social workers need to recognise diversity: valuing and respecting service users – irrespective of, for example, their ethnicity, gender or age – is central to good practice. It is also about working in a way that counters the unfair or unequal treatment of individuals or groups on the basis of their race, gender, class, age, culture, religion, sexuality or ability. There is a growing body of law that seeks to prohibit and punish a range of discriminatory behaviours in various kinds of so
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What is Energy?
With an introduction to the ideas of energy, students discuss specific types of energy and the practical sources of energy. Hands-on activities help them identify types of energy in their surroundings and enhance their understanding of energy.
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Energy Detectives at Work
Students search for clues of energy around them. They use what they find to create their own definition of energy. They also relate their energy clues to the engineering products they encounter every day.
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