5.2.1 Microwave

You saw the importance of microwave transmission for newsgathering in the Higgins extract. The term ‘microwave’ identifies a particular range of frequencies used for radio communications. The range of frequencies that are referred to as ‘microwave’ is not exactly defined (or, rather, slightly different ranges are used in different contexts), but roughly speaking it is from about 200 MHz to 50 GHz. [Remember that MHz stands for megahertz, which is 1,000,000 Hz (106 Hz) and G
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5.2 Other transmission media

Wires are still used to carry electrical signals over short distances. At the time of writing, for example, most connections between telephones in private houses and the local telephone exchange still use wires. The telephone networks within office buildings are mostly connected with wires, and so are many computer networks (local area networks, LANs) within single buildings. However, all longer-distance communication, between towns, cities or countries, uses either optical fibre or microwave
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4.4.2 Battery parameters

Now that we have covered some background on electricity, I will return to discussing batteries.

Activity 19

What do you think would be the important characteristics of a battery for a portable ICT device such as a camcorder or a
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4.2.5 Emotions

Emotions can be easily misunderstood when you can't see faces or body language. People may not realise you are joking; irony and satire are easily missed. Smileys or emoticons such as :-) and :-( can be used to express your feelings (look at these sideways). Other possibilities are punctuation (?! #@*!), or , , or even using mock HTML tags such as smileys are stupid.

Remember that many discussion systems only support plain text so you can't rel
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4.2 Netiquette

Work through the following material on ‘netiquette’ and then try the quiz at the end of the section.


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References

Pearson, I. (2004) The Future of Everyday Life in 2010, British Telecommunications plc. [online] www.bt.com/sphere/insights/pearson/everyday.htm, accessed 6 September 2006.
Pragnell, M., Spence, L, and Moore R. (November, 2000) The Market Potential for Smart Homes, N40, Joseph Rowntree Foundation [online], York Publishing Services www.jrf.org.uk/knowledge/findings/housing/n40.asp, accessed 6 Septem
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3 The Unified Process

The Unified Process (UP) (Jacobson et al., 1999) has emerged as a popular iterative and incremental development process for building enterprise systems based on an object-oriented approach. It promotes a set of best practices, namely that development should be organised in short time-boxed iterations, and that it should be adaptive to accommodate inevitable change.

Time boxing means that a (usually) short fixed period of time is devoted to each iteration, e.g. three to fo
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2.3 Risk management

No software development is free from risk, and one crucial activity of development is identifying and managing it. Managing risks requires an early identification of any threats to the development or operation of a system, and then monitoring these threats during development. In an iterative and incremental development, risks in the development stage can be tightly monitored and controlled. The emphasis on short cycles that lead to early implementation helps to address technological problems
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Introduction

In this unit I look at a number of different programming and design styles associated with distributed system development. The unit first examines message passing and the role of protocols – both fixed and adaptive protocols. Two styles of message passing are also examined: synchronous and asynchronous message passing. The next part of the unit introduces distributed object technology. Event-based development relies on listener objects listening to events which are propagated along a bus; t
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Acknowledgements

The following material is Proprietary (not subject to Creative Commons) and used under licence (see terms and conditions).

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following for permission to reproduce material:

Ince, D. Developing Internet Applications, chapters 1 and 4, published by Pearson Education Limited in collaboration with The Open University, © Pearson Education Limited, 2002, 2003. This publication forms part of an Open University course M360 Developing
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3.4 Stage 3: Deciding what to revise

In Stage 2, you will have reminded yourself of the scope of the course, and you will also have a sense of the range and breadth of topics you have covered. Now you need to decide what to revise.

Activity 5

Stages 1 and 2 will have giv
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1 Revision and exams

Most likely, you are reading this unit because you feel unsure about your ability to do yourself justice in exams. You may never have taken an exam and are wondering how to prepare yourself. It may have been a long time since you took an exam, and you feel a need to refresh your technique. You may be looking for reassurance and advice because you may have had a bad exam experience in the past. Whatever your reason, we hope that this unit will help.

This unit is a practical one, and we w
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4.4.7 Realistic

This reminds you to take into account, for example, your current knowledge, skills and qualities; the knowledge skills and qualities you are aiming for; the help and hindrances you are likely to encounter along the way; and the time you have available. Setting realistic goals can help to foster a can-do attitude – success helps to breed success, while failure can breed further failure, as you become more downhearted. So, reach for something that stretches you, but which will not overwhelm y
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2.2 Everyday learning – what’s going on?

This section will start with two examples of the sort of learning that occurs on an everyday basis. The aim here is to start you thinking about the ways in which learning goes on all the time. To illustrate this, read Jim’s story. As you read, you might like to begin to think about whether any aspects of Jim’s story might also be a part of your ‘story’. (In this context, we are using the word ‘story’ to mean what has happened in your life so far. We are not using it to mean someth
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5.1.1 Do you dread deadlines?

Of course, there are lots of different patterns of working: some students can only work to deadlines at the very last minute; while others prefer to work in shorter snatches over longer periods. The main problem with the former is that you may have to skip over some of the points we are now discussing, which could be counter-productive.

Waiting until the last minute may be because you are afraid to begin. If this applies to you – as it will to many others – you might find it helpful
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5.2 The value of the text

We now turn to a critical assessment of the poem as a poem; the question is, is it a ‘good’ poem? To that we should add ‘of its kind’. As we saw, we must judge it as a lyric poem – it would be inappropriate to think of it in the same terms as, say, an epic, because the conventions that govern the epic's form (its subject matter, purposes and formal elements) are very different. It is always important to understand what kind of text you are dealing with no
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1.2 Different arts and humanities subjects

If studying the arts and humanities helps us understand our culture so that we can live together more meaningfully, then why do we study particular subjects or ‘disciplines’ in our universities? You may be studying a single discipline: a language (ancient or modern), history, art, music, literature, film, law, religion, philosophy – and so forth; or some subjects combined, in multi- or inter-disciplinary studies. Why not the arts and humanities in general?

It is partly beca
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Acknowledgements

The content acknowledged below is Proprietary (see terms and conditions)>and is used under licence and is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence>

Figures

Figure 2 Photograph published with permission of the International Tr
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Introduction

Much of what is most important about management is interpersonal, how we deal with others. Awareness of our own and others’ interpersonal skills can help us enormously in dealing with the work tasks we are responsible for.

This unit is from our archive and is an adapted extract from Understanding management (Y159) which is no longer taught by The Open University. If you want to study formally with us, you may wish to explore other courses we offer in
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8.3.2 Identify the outcomes you hope to achieve

An outcome is the result or consequence of a process. For example, you may want contribute effectively to a design project in a course, or work in a team to improve a product or system. In this case the design or product improvement is an outcome, and using your problem-solving skills is part of the process by which you achieve that outcome. You may find it useful to discuss or negotiate the outcomes you hope to achieve with others. Solving problems will often depend to some extent on other k
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