6 Summary

Nuclear power generation results from fission of uranium isotopes when bombarded by neutrons. Conventional burner reactors require relatively scarce uranium-235, whereas fast breeder reactors (which have not yet been developed on any significant scale) would exploit more abundant uranium-238.

In the early 21st century over 400 nuclear — mainly burner — reactors produced 16% of global electricity demand.

The UK played a leading role in nuclear power developments during the 1950
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4.5 Geological criteria for safe radioactive waste disposal

Even in the best of circumstances, containers such as the one shown in Figure 19 will survive for only 100–1000 years, although the glass itself may inhibit the migration of radioactive isotopes for a further 1000 years. So, in view of the long decay times (Author(s): The Open University

4.2 Reactor safety: the Chernobyl incident

By far the worst nuclear reactor accident took place on 26 April 1986 when one of four 1 GW reactors at Chernobyl in the Ukraine released a radioactive cloud over Europe (Figure 17). (See S278 video clips document.) The build-up to this accident has been related to a series of complex chemical reactions induced
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Introduction

The transformation of radioactive uranium and, in some instances, thorium isotopes provides vastly more energy per unit mass of fuel than any other energy source, except nuclear fusion, and therein lies its greatest attraction.

The potential of nuclear fuels for energy production became a reality when the first experimental atomic pile, built by Enrico Fermi and Léo Szilárd at the University of Chicago, began functioning in December 1942. That led to the manufacture of fissionable mat
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6 Summary

  1. Waterlogged organic matter accumulates in deltaic, coastal barrier or raised mires to form peat. Coal forms by the compaction and decomposition of peat. Chemical changes imposed by increasing temperature and pressure over time determine the coal rank.

  2. Coalfields can be classified as either exposed or concealed, depending on whether or not the coal-bearing rocks are hidden by younger strata. In most coalfields, mining commenced in the shallower
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5 Coal production in the UK early in the 21st century

This section examines the UK's coal industry in a little more detail, to see how the complex interplay of location, economics and politics has led to the rapid demise of an industry that was once at the heart of the UK's economy.

Figure 38 shows production and consumption figures for coal mined in the UK since 1945 a
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3.1 Environmental aspects of coal mining

Coal produced by both types of mining is used either to fuel electricity generation or for industrial and domestic heating, both of which result in atmospheric pollution, but here we are concerned with direct environmental impact on the land. Surface and underground mining operations cause significantly different environmental problems. Those that surround surface mining are common to any large quarrying operation: sterilization of the land and restoration of quarry sites; dust; and noise whi
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2.3.4 Geophysical methods — borehole logging

If a core is not recovered from a borehole, another way to assess the types of rock that it penetrates is to measure their physical properties. Mounting a string of electronic instruments behind the drill bit most conveniently does this: it allows the properties of the rock to be monitored as the borehole is drilled. An alternative is to lower instruments down the completed borehole by cable; hence the name wireline logging.

Such logging measures several physical properties of th
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2.2 Winning coal in former times

Coal was probably first used as a fuel by early Chinese civilizations, and there is evidence for coal working in the UK since Roman times. However, early approaches to mining were limited by the available technology, and left much of the coal behind.

At first, coal was dug from seams exposed at the surface in shallow excavations into valley sides that followed the coal seam. The amount of coal that could be extracted from these trenches and from adits (short horizontal tunnels) w
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1.6 Impurities in coal

Coal rank reflects the maturity of a coal, but another variable is the ratio of combustible organic matter to inorganic impurities found within the coal. As discussed earlier, impurities result mainly from clay minerals washed into the mire prior to its eventual burial. In addition, some impurities are formed from the plant material itself during coalification.

These inorganic impurities are non-combustible and therefore leave an inert residue or ash after coal combustion. High-a
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1.4 Coal-forming environments in the geological record

Figure 5 simplifies a typical vertical succession of sedimentary rocks found in many coalfields. The sequence from the base of the section upwards reveals the following:

  1. When a mire starts to form, the first plants take root in underlying clays or sands that form the soil. Their r
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7.1 Introduction

In all eukaryotic cells, proteins that are destined for the plasma membrane or secretion are synthesised in the rough endoplasmic reticulum and enter the Golgi apparatus where they undergo a variety of post-translational modifications, before transfer to the cell surface in secretory vesicles.

  • Which post-translational modifications of proteins occur in which compar
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4.3 Glycosylation sequences and protein glycosylation

Polysachharide units on proteins may be simple or branched and are almost completely confined to those proteins destined for the cell surface or secretion. The sites and types of glycosylation are determined by the primary structure of the protein and by the availability of enzymes to carry out glycosylation (glycosyltransferases).

N-linked polysaccharides are attached to the –NH2 groups of asparagine and O-linked polysaccharides are attached to the –OH groups of serine a
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3.5 Cycling and re-use of membranes and traffic proteins

As already mentioned, a vesicle follows a cycle in which it gains its coat, is released from a donor membrane, moves to the target membrane, becomes uncoated, and fuses with the target membrane. Once a vesicle releases its contents by fusing with the target membrane, its components become part of the target membrane or of the lumen of the compartment bounded by the target membrane. The vesicular membrane that has fused with the target membrane needs to be retrieved to form new vesicles. Recov
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3.3 Fusion of vesicles with the target membrane

In this section, we shall look at how vesicles fuse with the appropriate target membrane. The targeting of different classes of transport vesicles to their distinct membrane destinations is essential in maintaining the distinct characteristics of the various eukaryotic organelles. Because coat proteins, such as clathrin, are found in different trafficking pathways, it follows that other proteins in the coat must specify the direction of transport of a particular vesicle and its ultimate desti
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Introduction

The cytoskeleton is of fundamental importance to a cell, and the development of different elements of the cytoskeleton were key steps in the evolution of eukaryotic cells. The cytoskeleton controls cell shape and allows cell movement; it is required for many aspects of intracellular trafficking of vesicles and organelles, and it is involved in cell division. Because of its important role in facilitating the movement of vesicles between compartments, but a basic understanding of how the cytosk
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3.8 Activation of transcription factors

We have already come across several examples of signalling pathways leading to activation (or inactivation) of transcription factors, which in turn modulate transcription of sets of genes leading to, for example, programs of differentiation or proliferation. You will also meet several other specific examples in subsequent chapters. For now, we shall examine one particular scenario, namely the activation of immediate early genes by MAP kinases, which illustrates some of the principles and deta
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3.5 Summary of Section 3

  1. Protein domains allow segregation of different functions in the same protein. They can have a binding function, a structural function or a catalytic function.

  2. Binding domains mediate interactions between proteins of related function (such as those in a signalling cascade) and often are important in regulation of activity. Interactions via these binding domains are often dependent on the phosphorylation state of one of the binding partners. Exa
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3.1 Introduction

That proteins contain functionally and physically discrete modules or domains is an important principle, one that will be reinforced as we examine the roles of specific proteins in a variety of different cellular processes.

There are several advantages conferred by multidomain protein architecture:

  1. Creation of catalytic or substrate-binding sites These sites are often formed at the interface between two domains, typically a cleft. Movement
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1.6 Fibrous proteins

Most of the proteins described so far have been globular proteins. There are, however, some distinctive features that characterise fibrous proteins and we present here a general overview of these. Elongated fibrous proteins frequently play a structural role in the cell. They do not readily crystallise but tend to aggregate along their long axis to form fibres. X-ray diffraction studies of these fibres, in contrast to analysis of protein crystals, provides only very limited information on the
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