12.7 Summary of Section 12

For precise localisation of a sound source, binaural cues are required.

Two types of binaural cue are used to localise non-continuous sounds in the horizontal plane: interaural time differences, which are most efficient for low-frequency sounds (20–1500 Hz) and interaural intensity cues, which are important for high-frequency sounds (1500–20 000 Hz). The frequency responses in the superior olive reflect these differences. The medial superior olive includes neurons that are responsiv
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11.3 Frequency selectivity

In preceding sections we examined two ways in which the auditory system may code frequency information: the place theory and phase locking. In this section we will look at the psychophysical evidence for place coding on the basilar membrane by examining the ability of the auditory system to resolve the components of sinusoidal waves in a complex sound – a phenomenon known as frequency selectivity.

The perception of a sound depends not only on its own frequency and intensity but also o
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Learning outcomes

After studying this Unit you should know:

  • that certain minerals are required in the body and that some minerals form essential structural components of tissues;

  • that sodium, potassium, calcium and chloride ions are important in maintaining the correct composition of cells and of the tissue fluids around them (homeostasis);

  • that some minerals are essential components of important molecules such as hormones and enzymes;

  • that the correct
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1.7.1 Enzymes: nature's catalysts

It will probably come as no surprise to you that chemical reactions, including the conversion of arachidonic acid into prostaglandin, do not occur instantaneously and the rate at which they take place can be very variable. Some reactions are over in a flash, such as the burning of gunpowder, and others take months, such as rust formation on a car. All chemical reactions can be speeded up by increasing the temperature of the reactants. In the laboratory one often ‘cooks’ reaction mixtures
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1.8 Primordial nucleosynthesis

Time: 100 s to 1000 s

Temperature: 109 K to 3 × 108 K

Energy: 300 keV to 100 keV

As the temperature continued to decrease, protons and neutrons were able to combine to make light nuclei. This marked the beginning of the period referred to as the era of primordial nucleosynthesis (which literally means ‘making nuclei’). The first such reaction to become energetically favoured was that of a single proton and neutron comb
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10 ‘Science for all?’ A look at some contexts

The following statement is from the science National Curriculum in England published in 2000.

The importance of science

Science stimulates and excites pupils’ curiosity about phenomena and events in the world around them. It also satisfies this curiosity with knowledge. Because science links direct practical experience with ideas, it can engage learners at many levels. Scientific meth
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4 Key players in law enforcement

If a law is broken, who has the responsibility for ensuring that the individual or company who has broken the law is ‘brought to justice’?

Activity 5: Who enforces the law?

0 hours 10 minutes
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1.1 ‘Company law’

Before embarking on this unit, it is important to take some time to think about the implications of its title: Company law in context. In particular, what constitutes ‘company law’, and what is the context in which we are thinking about it?

At this point, you might like to pause for a moment and contemplate what this phrase means to you. In particular, what do you understand by the concept of a ‘company’?

At first, this may seem like a ludicrously straightforward question.
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2.7 Powers and roots

There are several symbols for powers and roots: for instance, 24 means ‘2 to the power 4’. An alternative to 24 is 24, where the symbol Author(s): The Open University

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One Minute Romanian - flyer
From the makers of the award-winning online language course Coffee Break Spanish comes a new range of titles aimed at busy people who want to acquire the absolute basics of a language. One Minute Languages from the Radio Lingua Network will introduce learners to a new language from scratch. The course is made up of ten lessons and covers topics including basic greetings, introducing yourself, and dealing with language problems. You’ll also learn numbers and other useful words and phrases whi
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Electrons in the magetic field of two Helmholtz coilsIn the part about the path of the electrons in the magnetic field of two Helmholz coils students can manipulate the acceleration voltage of an electron gun and the coil current. They can measure the radius of the electrons circular path and the specific charge of an electron.
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Congress, Extortion, and Unfunded Mandates

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Initial French lessons

Authors: 
Ruth De Oliviera