"Media and the Making of the Modern State"
don wyclifrLecture by Don Wycliff, Chicago Tribune Public Editor; from the 2005 University of Chicago Summer Institute for Educators.







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Dominique Decherf: "The Future of Transatlantic Alliances"
A talk by Dominique Decherf, Consul General of France. From the Rethinking America in the Middle East Series, presented by: International House Global Voices Program, the Norman Wait Harris Fund of the Center for International Studies, the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, and the Human Rights Program
Author(s): The Center for International Studies at the Univer

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Phil Wiggins & Friends: Acoustical Blues & Dance from Maryland
A concert by Phil Wiggins and Friends, an all-star blues and dance group including Phil Wiggins (harmonica), Rick Franklin (guitar and vocals) Marcus Moore (violin) and Junious Brickhouse (dance). Speaker Biography: According to the National Council for Traditional Arts, "Phil Wiggins is arguably America's foremost blues harmonica virtuoso. While rooted in the melodic Piedmont or 'Tidewater' blues of the Chesapeake region, his mastery of the instrument now transcends stylistic boundaries. Born
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Sounds of Korea: Traditional Music & Dance from New York
Performance art by Sounds of Korea. Speaker Biography: Sounds of Korea is part of the New-York-based Korean Performing Arts Center (KPAC), consisting of a dance troupe, an instrumental chamber ensemble and a percussion ensemble. Korean performance art includes a wide range of styles and settings, such as classical court music, theatrical masked dance, popular storytelling songs, drama, popular narrative vocal arts, and solo instrumental folk genres, as well as the percussion music and dances o
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CSU Course Redesign ePortfolio ADaneshvari
Survey of World Art 101A, B and C is presently a three quarter art history introduction aimed to broaden the cultural perspectives of student GE requirements and to prepare undergraduate students for a degree in art with specialization in the history of art.
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4.1 Scientific approaches

Even after many years of research, the phenomenon of hibernation continues to be a mystery to scientists. Despite coming nearer to an understanding of how and why it happens, some fundamental questions remain unanswered. Is there a genetic basis underlying the evolutionary predisposition of animals to hibernate, given its occurrence in many groups of vertebrates and invertebrates? Is the problem of metabolic adaptation in cells separate from thermal regulation which occurs throughout the orga
Author(s): The Open University

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5 Summary

At the time of writing (2006) a relatively small number of types of GM crop have been grown globally, in a limited number of countries. The take-up of these crops has been relatively high in countries like the USA and Canada, but very much lower in Europe. However, there is a very rapid increase in the growth of GM crops in developing countries.

The technique most commonly used to introduce new genetic material into dicots has involved the use of a modified soil bacterium, Agrobacter
Author(s): The Open University

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The relationship between the EC and the EU

The words ‘European Economic Community’ (EEC), ‘European Community’ (EC) and ‘European Union’ (EU) have already been used in this unit, and many texts and journal and newspaper articles use them interchangeably. It is important that you are clear on their relationship and what they mean. This unit will always refer to the current position as the EU, but what is the relationship between the EC, the EEC and the EU?

As mentioned earlier, the Maastricht Treaty (1992) established
Author(s): The Open University

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Historical Interactions between Science and Religion part one
Talk given by Prof. John Hedley Brooke as part of short course 4
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7.1 Introduction

Until now, we have discussed DNA primarily as a double helix, but in its natural state within the cell it is found packaged as a complex mixture with many different proteins and other components. You have already seen examples of proteins with specific roles to play, such as topoisomerases and the proteins with various DNA binding domains, but in this section we will turn our attention to the proteins that serve to pack and organise the DNA into what we call chromatin.

The packaging of
Author(s): The Open University

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2.1.1 Try some yourself

Activity 14

Measurement of a ceiling gives a length of 6.28 m and a width of 3.91 m.

  • (a) Make a rough estimate of the area of the ceiling (the length times the width).


    Author(s): The Open University

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1.7.1 Enzymes: nature's catalysts

It will probably come as no surprise to you that chemical reactions, including the conversion of arachidonic acid into prostaglandin, do not occur instantaneously and the rate at which they take place can be very variable. Some reactions are over in a flash, such as the burning of gunpowder, and others take months, such as rust formation on a car. All chemical reactions can be speeded up by increasing the temperature of the reactants. In the laboratory one often ‘cooks’ reaction mixtures
Author(s): The Open University

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1.4 Broadly typical phases of PhD research

A modern PhD can be viewed as having three key phases (very roughly, but not strictly, corresponding to the three years of a full-time degree), each of which contributes a necessary element of mastery:

  1. Orientation – mastering the literature and formulating a research problem and plan.

  2. Intensive research – gathering the evidence to support the thesis, whether empirical or theoretical.

  3. Entering t
    Author(s): The Open University

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Conclusion

This free course provided an introduction to studying Science. It took you through a series of exercises designed to develop your approach to study and learning at a distance and helped to improve your confidence as an independent learner.


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2.2 Using A. tumefaciens to genetically modify plant cells

Genetic engineers have capitalised on the fact that part of the DNA from the Ti plasmid of A. tumefaciens is integrated into the plant genome during the infection process. Ti plasmids can be isolated and a foreign gene spliced in at an appropriate point, making it possible to transfer the novel gene into the plant.

Author(s): The Open University

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3.3 The Earth's internal heat

The occurrence of both volcanoes and hot springs shows that the Earth's interior is hot, producing molten rock at temperatures up to 1250 °C, and also superheated steam. However, these phenomena are mainly confined to several narrow zones along the world's active plate boundaries. Many measurements have now been made of the amount of heat flowing from the Earth's interior. Outside the distinctive zones mentioned above, heat flow varies from 40-120 milliwatts per square metre (mW m−2
Author(s): The Open University

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1.3.9 Summary

There is a lot of information available on maths and statistics via the internet. Try the activity below to start exploring what is available.

Activity 1

2.6 A gene ‘for’ obesity?

So far we have mostly emphasized the way in which different environmental factors may affect body weight and provide a partial explanation of both individual cases of obesity and the increase in average body weight that has been so clearly documented in both North America and Western Europe during the last two decades. There is also marked individual variability in body weight. For example, any weight between about 58 and 78 kg would be regarded as ‘desirable’ for a person of height 1.77
Author(s): The Open University

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References

Colburn, T., Dumanoski, D. and Myers, J. P. (1996) Our Stolen Future, Little, Brown and Co.

Kishi, M., Hirschorn, N., Djajadisastra, M., Saterlee, L. N., Strowman, S. and Dilts, R. (1995) Relationship of pesticide spraying to signs and symptoms in Indonesian farmers, Scandinavian Journal of Work and Environmental Health, 21 (2), pp. 124– 33.

Wilson, E. O. (1992) The Diversity of Life, The Bellknap Press of the Harvard University Press, Cambridge, USA.


Author(s): The Open University

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Ancient Egypt IC132_001

*

The golden mask of the mummy of the Egyptian Pharaoh Tutankhamun, with a an ancient Egyptian temple complex in the background. Illustration by Ivan Lapper, 1990s.
© Historic England Archive


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