References

Baker, M. (2006). Private communication, Business in the Community, 29 March.
Brewster, D. (2004). ‘CalPERS wave-making brings flak’, Financial Times Fund Management, 9 August.
Business Week (2004). ‘Special report: corporate governance, investors fight back’, 17 May.
Butz, C. (2003). Decomposing SRI Pe
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Diverse perspectives on health and illness
Health, and the health of others, are concerns that impact us all. This album explores notions of health and happiness in relation to the lifestyles people lead and the services and support available to them. The range of information is eclectic and illuminating, offering a rare insight into societal niches from the participants themselves. From health workers to the homeless, this series of interviews and discussions emphasises the relationship between how people live their lives and the decisi
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In rural South Africa there are thousands of people who receive little or no medical care. So what can be done for them? One answer is Phelophepa, the Good Health Train, which makes a circuit of the country every two years. This album joins the team of doctors, medical students and health workers on the train as they visit the town of Taba Nchu. In the weeks before Phelophepa arrives, community activists try to raise public awareness so that as many people as possible are able to benefit. And be
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1.2.1 Stating essential conditions

These structures are used to show conditions that are essential.

Must + infinitive

The location must have good road communications.

Must not + infinitive

It must not be more than two hours by lorry from London.

Have to + infinitive

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8.1 Feelings about care relationships

Diane couldn't imagine being paid for what she did. She thought that, if she was paid, she would, ‘have felt obligated to do it’. This way it felt like her choice. ‘I wanted to make those choices freely.’

John described the basis of his caring for Mr Asghar as, ‘a mutually beneficial friendship … always has been’.

Enid emphasised that she looked on her caring as a parental responsibility. ‘They're my children and it's my duty to look after them … they weren't ask
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4 Audio clip 3: Enid Francis

Enid Francis lived in a modern residential area on the outskirts of Derby. She shared a house with her husband, Wally, and two grown-up sons, Mark and John. Her husband had had to give up work eighteen months before his retirement, because of a heart complaint. Their two sons, aged 35 and 32, were both autistic. Enid's day was organised around meeting their needs for care and support. On weekdays, they attended a day centre, which she would have to get them ready for. When they came home in t
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3.19 Key ethical issues for CAM practitioners: professional etiquette and whistleblowing

In the past, professional bodies cautioned their members against disparaging other members of the same profession in front of a user. In the UK many codes of ethics still discuss professional etiquette from the perspective of safeguarding the interests of the practitioner rather than the user. Sensitivity is required when treating a user who is dissatisfied with a previous practitioner, but this should not prevent a practitioner being critical of someone else's obviously unacceptable treatmen
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2.4.2 Holism and ideas about the body

Reductionist medical approaches have been criticised for providing a fixed, mechanistic view of the body, which fails to capture the patient's experience. The power associated with biomedical diagnoses and expertise means that patients’ explanations for their illnesses are often overlooked or dismissed. Does holism, which seeks to treat the mind, body and spirit, fare any better in giving patients a sense of control or ownership of what their illness means? This question is often reframed i
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2.4.1 Reductionism and ‘ownership’ of the body

Social scientists interested in changing relationships between workers and users of health care often draw attention to what is termed the loss of ownership or loss of governance of the body. These terms mean that a person's body is treated in some health situations as more important than the person themselves. It is almost as if they are purely a case, an example of a type of disease, or a set of symptoms. Traditionally, such criticisms were levelled against biomedical approach
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Framework of public hygiene and epidemiology; human pathology related to water and sanitation: infections, prevention and therapy: 'social medicine': health and society in the Netherlands and in developing countries; health and environment: environmental epidemiology and ecotoxicology, protective measures and legislation and rules.
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