McMaster's downtown Health Campus
McMaster broke ground on its downtown Health Campus Dec. 3 which, when complete, will see 54,000 patient visits and 4,000 McMaster students pass through each year. http://dailynews.mcmaster.ca/article/ground-broken-for-mcmaster-health-campus/
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Degrees of change
Four of UNSW's original Colombo Plan students return to campus in 2012 and reflect on what their degrees meant to them and their countries.
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ANU and ABC 666 Psychology Week Forum: Have we fallen out of love with women?
The glass ceiling is a term commonly used to refer to the complex and ill-defined barrier apparently separating many women from the very top levels of the workforce. To succeed at the top, women may have no choice but to put aside their feminine qualities and attributes, and assume an identity that is more traditionally male. The experience of success for women can therefore be very different than it is for men and it appears that Australians still struggle to feel love for female public figure
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Walter Lewin: Rainbows and Blue skies
Walter Lewin, world renowned MIT professor (emeritus) for his experiments and fascinating lectures, attracting millions of viewers on Youtube, offered guest lectures at TU Delft. These lectures are now online, available as OpenCourseWare. You can: Watch the lecture online, in Englis and in Dutch View photo’s on Flickr
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The Dutch Jazz Orchestra, "Scorpio"

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Mary Lou Williams and The Dutch Jazz Orchestra

copyright 2005, Challenge Records International


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2.3 What does relationship mean in systematics? G.G. Simpson

Activity 2

0 hours 5 minutes

Dr. Patterson continues to look at Simpson’s answer to the meaning of ‘relationship’ in systematics, and illustrates this by referring to a diagrams showing how the
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1.1 Introduction

To the lay person, it might seem surprising that there is any problem with the recognition of higher taxa. The very existence of long-established vernacular names for inclusive groupings of species (e.g. finches, thrushes, parrots and hawks as distinct groups of birds) suggests that higher taxa are self-evident. Accordingly, the task of the taxonomist might seem merely to consist of recognising these groupings and assembling them in a hierarchy of increasingly inclusive categories.

Inde
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1.3.1 Try some yourself

1 The new home owners from Example 4 above want to price grass seed, as well as the turf (transport only). The best buy seems to be loose seed, which says ‘1 kilo covers 80 m2’. They wonder what length the side of an 80 m2
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1.1.1 Try some yourself

1 Evaluate the following:

  • (a) 62

  • (b) 0.52

  • (c) 1.52

Answer<
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2.2.1 Try some yourself

1 Consider the table about household sizes.


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2.1 Tables

Experiments or surveys usually generate a lot of information from which it is possible to draw conclusions. Such information is called data. Data are often presented in newspapers or books.

One convenient way to present data is in a table. For instance, the nutrition panel on the back of a food packet:

Nutrition Information

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Acknowledgements

The content acknowledged below is Proprietary (see terms and conditions) and is used under licence.

All materials included in this unit are derived from content originated at the Open University.


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Learning outcomes

After studying this unit you should:

  • know some basic definitions and terminology associated with scalars and vectors and how to represent vectors in two dimensions;

  • understand how vectors can be represented in three (or more) dimensions and know both plane polar and Cartesian representations;

  • know ways to operate on and combine vectors.


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Introduction

This unit introduces the topic of vectors. The subject is developed without assuming you have come across it before, but the unit assumes that you have previously had a basic grounding in algebra and trigonometry, and how to use Cartesian coordinates for specifying a point in a plane.

This is an adapted extract from the Open University course Mathematical methods and models (MST209)
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Acknowledgements

The content acknowledged below is Proprietary (see terms and conditions) and is used under licence.

All materials included in this unit are derived from content originated at the Open University.


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Acknowledgements

The content acknowledged below is Proprietary (see terms and conditions) and is used under licence.

All materials included in this unit are derived from content originated at the Open University.


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1 Modelling with Fourier series

The main teaching text of this unit is provided in the workbook below. The answers to the exercises that you'll find throughout the workbook are given in the answer book. You can access it by clicking on the link under the workbook.

Click 'View document' to open the workbook (PDF, 0.6 MB).

Learning outcomes

After studying this unit you should be able to:

  • understand how the wave and diffusion partial differential equations can be used to model certain systems;

  • determine appropriate simple boundary and initial conditions for such models;

  • find families of solutions for the wave equation, damped wave equation, diffusion equation and similar homogeneous linear second-order partial differential equations, subject to simple boundary conditions, using the meth
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Introduction

This unit shows how partial differential equations can be used to model phenomena such as waves and heat transfer. The prerequisite requirements to gain full advantage from this unit are an understanding of ordinary differential equations and basic familiarity with partial differential equations.

This unit is an adapted extract from the course Mathematical methods and models (MST209
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